Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Cachita's streets : the Virgin of Charity, race, and revolution in Cuba / Jalane D. Schmidt.

By: Schmidt, Jalane D, 1968- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: Religious cultures of African and African diaspora people: Publisher: Durham , Duke University Press ; 2015Description: xi, 357 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780822359180; 0822359189; 9780822359371; 0822359375.Subject(s): Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint -- Devotion to -- Cuba | Mary, Blessed Virgin, Saint | Virgen de La Caridad | CUBA | Caridad del Cobre, Virgen de la | Revolutions -- Cuba -- History | Caridad del Cobre, Virgen de la | Devotion | Race relations | Revolutions | Marienverehrung | Cuba -- Race relations | Cuba -- History | Cuba | Cuba -- History | Cuba -- Race relationsGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 277.291/082
Contents:
Introduction: "Antes": processions past -- From foundling to intercessor: Our Lady help of slaves -- Mambisa virgin: patrona of the patria -- Royalty in exile: banishing Bembes -- Crowning Caridad: the queen of republican Cuba -- The virgin general on the march: conquering Cuba? -- Rebel sierras and lowlands: petitioning the mother of Cuba -- "Todos a la plaza!": mobilizing in revolutionary time and space -- "The streets are for revolutionaries!": prohibiting processions -- Luchando in the special period: papal visit -- Conclusion: processions present: returning to the streets, 1998-2012.
Summary: Cuba's patron saint, the Virgin of Charity of El Cobre, also called Cachita, is a potent symbol of Cuban national identity. Jalane D. Schmidt shows how groups as diverse as Indians and African slaves, Spanish colonial officials, Cuban independence soldiers, Catholic authorities and laypeople, intellectuals, journalists and artists, practitioners of spiritism and Santería, activists, politicians, and revolutionaries each have constructed and disputed the meanings of the Virgin. Schmidt examines the occasions from 1936 to 2012 when the Virgin's beloved, original brown-skinned effigy was removed from her national shrine in the majority black- and mixed-race mountaintop village of El Cobre and brought into Cuba's cities. There, devotees venerated and followed Cachita's image through urban streets, amassing at large-scale public ceremonies in her honor that promoted competing claims about Cuban religion, race, and political ideology. Schmidt compares these religious rituals to other contemporaneous Cuban street events, including carnival, protests, and revolutionary rallies, where organizers stage performances of contested definitions of Cubanness. Schmidt provides a comprehensive treatment of Cuban religions, history, and culture, interpreted through the prism of Cachita. (Publisher).
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
BT660.C349 S36 2015 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002246767

Includes bibliographical references (pages 323-345) and index.

Introduction: "Antes": processions past -- From foundling to intercessor: Our Lady help of slaves -- Mambisa virgin: patrona of the patria -- Royalty in exile: banishing Bembes -- Crowning Caridad: the queen of republican Cuba -- The virgin general on the march: conquering Cuba? -- Rebel sierras and lowlands: petitioning the mother of Cuba -- "Todos a la plaza!": mobilizing in revolutionary time and space -- "The streets are for revolutionaries!": prohibiting processions -- Luchando in the special period: papal visit -- Conclusion: processions present: returning to the streets, 1998-2012.

Cuba's patron saint, the Virgin of Charity of El Cobre, also called Cachita, is a potent symbol of Cuban national identity. Jalane D. Schmidt shows how groups as diverse as Indians and African slaves, Spanish colonial officials, Cuban independence soldiers, Catholic authorities and laypeople, intellectuals, journalists and artists, practitioners of spiritism and Santería, activists, politicians, and revolutionaries each have constructed and disputed the meanings of the Virgin. Schmidt examines the occasions from 1936 to 2012 when the Virgin's beloved, original brown-skinned effigy was removed from her national shrine in the majority black- and mixed-race mountaintop village of El Cobre and brought into Cuba's cities. There, devotees venerated and followed Cachita's image through urban streets, amassing at large-scale public ceremonies in her honor that promoted competing claims about Cuban religion, race, and political ideology. Schmidt compares these religious rituals to other contemporaneous Cuban street events, including carnival, protests, and revolutionary rallies, where organizers stage performances of contested definitions of Cubanness. Schmidt provides a comprehensive treatment of Cuban religions, history, and culture, interpreted through the prism of Cachita. (Publisher).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Cachita's Streets is a history of the Virgin of Charity of El Cobre's prominence and influence in Cuban life and society. Schmidt (Univ. of Virginia) tells the story with both verve and nuance. The 16-inch representation of the Virgin Mary was first discovered floating in the sea near El Cobre, Cuba, in the early 1600s. Originally an object of only local veneration, La Cachita (the Virgin's nickname) eventually became the patroness of the entire island nation. That story is well known, but what makes Cachita's Streets special is the attention the author gives to the many different contexts within which the Virgin has been venerated, supplicated, politicized, and racialized over the centuries--Cuba's tumultuous 20th century in particular. Providing a careful study of all the facets of the Virgin's role in Cuban life, Schmidt documents the multidimensional and contested Cachita of the streets, not merely the Virgin of the shrine in El Cobre. The result is an exemplary socioreligious history. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-division undergraduates through faculty. --Douglas Jacobsen, Messiah College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Jalane D. Schmidt is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.