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Haitian connections in the Atlantic World : recognition after revolution / Julia Gaffield.

By: Gaffield, Julia [author.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: xiii, 254 pages ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781469625621; 1469625628.Subject(s): 1804-1844 | Diplomatic relations | Haiti -- Foreign relations -- 1804-1844 | Haiti -- History -- 1804-1844 | Haiti | Haiti | Antilles | Etats-Unis | Europe | HaïtiGenre/Form: History.DDC classification: 972.94/04
Contents:
I put fear in the hearts of those who engage in this trade: French efforts to isolate Haiti in the Atlantic World -- I, leader of a country, treat for my citizens: Haiti and Jamaica after the French defeat -- Legislators of the Antilles: British regulation of trade with Haiti -- Aiming a blow at their very vitals: U.S. interdiction on trade with Haiti -- The "States of Hayti" and the British Empire.
Summary: "On January 1, 1804, Haiti shocked the world by declaring independence. Historians have long portrayed Haiti's postrevolutionary period as one during which the international community rejected Haiti's Declaration of Independence and adopted a policy of isolation designed to contain the impact of the world's only successful slave revolution. Julia Gaffield, however, anchors a fresh vision of Haiti's first tentative years of independence to its relationships with other nations and empires and reveals the surprising limits of the country's supposed isolation"--
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
F1922 .G34 2015 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002246734

Includes bibliographical references (pages 237-244) and index.

I put fear in the hearts of those who engage in this trade: French efforts to isolate Haiti in the Atlantic World -- I, leader of a country, treat for my citizens: Haiti and Jamaica after the French defeat -- Legislators of the Antilles: British regulation of trade with Haiti -- Aiming a blow at their very vitals: U.S. interdiction on trade with Haiti -- The "States of Hayti" and the British Empire.

"On January 1, 1804, Haiti shocked the world by declaring independence. Historians have long portrayed Haiti's postrevolutionary period as one during which the international community rejected Haiti's Declaration of Independence and adopted a policy of isolation designed to contain the impact of the world's only successful slave revolution. Julia Gaffield, however, anchors a fresh vision of Haiti's first tentative years of independence to its relationships with other nations and empires and reveals the surprising limits of the country's supposed isolation"--

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This thoughtful book revises understanding of Haiti's supposed post-revolutionary isolation. Yes, France and other powers of Europe and America refused (at least until 1825) to extend recognition to the new republic. Haiti represented another Western Hemispheric threat to colonial rule in the Caribbean and, as an ex-slave dominion, its emergence might embolden other slave colonies to revolt. However, as Gaffield (Georgia State Univ.) shows so well, economic relations with Haiti superseded any diplomatic hesitation. Haiti was reasonably well integrated into the Atlantic trading world of the early 19th century. Officially reluctant as the US was to "recognize" states run by ex-slaves until 1862, de facto recognition came very early. Trade needs prevailed. Especially in the early years, the British connection was critical to Haiti's emergence. Until the final peace with France, Britain was pleased to enlist Haiti against its former masters. Haiti was neither ignored nor pushed decisively out of the circle of nations by the undoubted bigotry of the bigger powers. Gaffield bases her important story on deep digging in archival records from Copenhagen to Port au Prince. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates and above. --Robert I. Rotberg, Harvard University

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