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Black No More : A Novel.

By: Schuyler, George.
Contributor(s): Miller, James 'Dusty'.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.New England Library of Black Literature Ser: Publisher: Boston, MA : Northeastern University Press, 1989Copyright date: ©1989Description: 1 online resource (113 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781555537753.Subject(s): African Americans--FictionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Black No More : A NovelDDC classification: 813/.52 LOC classification: PS3537.C76B56 1989Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Foreword to the 1989 Edition -- Preface -- One -- Two -- Three -- Four -- Five -- Six -- Seven -- Eight -- Nine -- Ten -- Eleven -- Twelve -- Thirteen.
Summary: What would happen to the race problem in America if black people could suddenly become white?.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS3537.C76B56 1989 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=1085090 Available EBC1085090

Intro -- Title Page -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Contents -- Foreword to the 1989 Edition -- Preface -- One -- Two -- Three -- Four -- Five -- Six -- Seven -- Eight -- Nine -- Ten -- Eleven -- Twelve -- Thirteen.

What would happen to the race problem in America if black people could suddenly become white?.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

George S. Schuyler was an African American professional journalist of considerable distinction who served as an officer in the army in World War I and later made a name for himself as a satirical polemicist, attacking both white and black positions in the racial politics of this country. He carved out a position for himself as a conservative spokesman within the African American community, particularly as an ardent anti-Communist. His ingenious Swiftian fantasy, Black No More (1934), tells the story of a miracle cure for black skin color by means of which, to the great discomfort of the white population, the black and white "races" become indistinguishable. (Bowker Author Biography)

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