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Regulating the Lives of Women : Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the Present.

By: Abramovitz, Mimi.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Milton : Routledge, 2017Copyright date: ©2018Edition: 3rd ed.Description: 1 online resource (355 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781351855280.Subject(s): Poor women--United States--HistoryGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Regulating the Lives of Women : Social Welfare Policy from Colonial Times to the PresentDDC classification: 362.8/3/0973 Online resources: Click here to view book
Contents:
Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 A feminist perspective on the welfare state -- 2 The colonial family ethic: the development of families, the ideology of women's roles , and the labor of women -- 3 Women and the poor laws in colonial America -- 4 "A woman's place is in the home": the rise of the industrial family ethic -- 5 Women and nineteenth-century relief -- 6 Poor women and Progressivism: protective labor law and Mothers' Pensions -- 7 The Great Depression and the Social Security Act: the emergence of the modern welfare state -- 8 Old Age Insurance -- 9 Unemployment Insurance -- 10 Aid to Families with Dependent Children: single mothers in the twentieth century -- 11 Restoring the family ethic: the assault on women and the welfare state in the 1980s and 1990s -- Conclusion: dare to struggle, dare to win -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HV699.A273 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4983410 Available EBC4983410

Cover -- Title -- Copyright -- Dedication -- CONTENTS -- Preface -- Acknowledgments -- Introduction -- 1 A feminist perspective on the welfare state -- 2 The colonial family ethic: the development of families, the ideology of women's roles , and the labor of women -- 3 Women and the poor laws in colonial America -- 4 "A woman's place is in the home": the rise of the industrial family ethic -- 5 Women and nineteenth-century relief -- 6 Poor women and Progressivism: protective labor law and Mothers' Pensions -- 7 The Great Depression and the Social Security Act: the emergence of the modern welfare state -- 8 Old Age Insurance -- 9 Unemployment Insurance -- 10 Aid to Families with Dependent Children: single mothers in the twentieth century -- 11 Restoring the family ethic: the assault on women and the welfare state in the 1980s and 1990s -- Conclusion: dare to struggle, dare to win -- Index.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

This critical historical analysis of U.S. social welfare policy argues that the ``feminization of poverty'' is not a recent development but dates back to colonial times. Abramovitz (social work, Hunter) demonstrates how rules and regulations of social welfare programs have been ideologically based, related to the assignment of homemaking and childcare responsibilities to women. She examines this policy, which has served women poorly, and its relationship to key programs: Social Security, AFDC, unemployment insurance. Ambitious and well researched, despite reliance on sweeping historical overview; of wide interest. Marie Marmo Mullaney, Caldwell Coll., N.J. (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

A must for collections serving programs in history, sociology, public policy, political science, social work, and womens studies, as well as general readers. It is the first thorough examination of the development of the welfare state in the US through a "gender-lens." Abramovitz (Hunter College School of Social Work) has published in social work and social policy journals, and in an anthology of feminist essays on social work. This book is an examination of the relationship between American women and the welfare state. The author argues, rightly, that much of the previous work in social welfare history ignores women and that thus "it is at best incomplete, at worst quite distorted." Abramovitz begins by reviewing theoretical perspectives on the welfare state. Using a socialist feminist perspective and her own concept of the family ethic, she traces the development of welfare policy from Colonial America through 1980s "Reaganomics." Abramovitz is clear about the potential weaknesses of her methods and the biases of her sources. She maintains throughout the work a vision that includes class and race as factors that influence the social construction of gender. The book is well organized, with extensive notes at the end of each chapter. No illustrations. J. Brown Eastern Connecticut State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Mimi Abramovitz, the Bertha Capen Reynolds Professor of Social Policy in the Silberman School of Social Work, Hunter College, City University of New York, USA, writes extensively about women, welfare, poverty and activism. From welfare caseworker to welfare rights organizer to welfare state scholar, Abramovitz has galvanized a generation of students explaining how public policy shapes the lives of white women and women of color and how they fight back.</p>

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