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Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism : A Transnational Biographical History.

By: Lehner, Ulrich L.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: London : Routledge, 2017Copyright date: ©2018Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (249 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781351344159.Subject(s): Catholic Church-Europe-History-18th century | Enlightenment-Europe | Catholic women-Europe-Biography | Catholic women-Religious life-EuropeGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism : A Transnational Biographical HistoryDDC classification: 282.409252 Online resources: Click here to view book
Contents:
Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism- Front Cover -- Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- Notes on contributors -- Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism: prolegomena -- Notes -- Chapter 1: Piety and popularity: the life and works of Félicité de Genlis (1746–1830) -- References -- Chapter 2: Marie Leprince de Beaumont (1711–1780): a popular religious pedagogue -- Intellectual sources and Enlightenment debates -- Religious and theological influences -- Pastoral ambitions: praxis versus theory -- European reception -- References -- Chapter 3: Adélaïde d’Orléans (1698–1743): the Abbess of Chelles -- House of Orléans -- Character -- A royal abbey -- Works and interests -- Life and fiction -- References -- Chapter 4: Josefa Amar y Borbón (1749–1833): an intellectual woman -- Self-critical Enlightenment: women’s reason and education -- Translation as public statement: choices and strategies -- Social activity and connections of an Enlightened Catholic -- Acknowledgment -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5: María Gertrudis Hore (1742–1801): the neoclassic poetry and Enlightenment thought of a cloistered Spanish nun -- Life as an Enlightened socialite-turned-nun -- Critical and historical reception -- The Anacreontic form in eighteenth-century Europe and Spain -- Hore’s Anacreontic poetry -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 6: María Lorenza de los Ríos y Loyo, Marquesa de Fuerte-Híjar: women’s writing and charity in the Spanish Enlightenment -- La niña de oro (The Golden Girl) -- Reforming charity for women -- The quandaries of changing gender roles -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 7: Teresa de Mello Breyner, Countess of Vimieiro (1739–1798?) -- The Countess of Vimieiro’s career in the political and cultural fields.
Catholicism as a cultural and political framework -- The presence of religion in the thought of the Countess of Vimieiro -- Religion and forbidden books -- A Catholic doxa -- References -- Chapter 8: Faith, science and the modern body: Anna Morandi’s studies of human anatomy in wax -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 9: The scientist and the saint: Laura Bassi’s Enlightened Catholicism -- Sanctifying Bologna -- Bassi’s Catholic formation -- Bless the children -- Reunited in the body of Christ -- Acknowledgment -- Notes -- Chapter 10: Maria Eleonora Sporck (1687−1717) and Anna Katharina Swéerts-Sporck (1689−1754): practitioners and promoters of the word at the edge of the Enlightenment -- Translating in service of cross-confessional “true Christianity” -- Interconnecting inner piety with social action -- Small-format book patronage -- From biographies of aspiring saints to the canon of learned men -- Note -- References -- Chapter 11: Between nation and universe: Caroline Pichler’s (1769−1843) Catholicism -- “Neither real Catholics nor real Austrians” -- Nation and devotion -- Mysticism and literature -- Women and religion -- References -- Chapter 12: Faith, education, renewal: Amalia von Gallitzin (1748–1806) -- Confessional and philosophical encounters at Berlin, Breslau and The Hague -- Emancipation through education -- Exploring new ways: Fürstenberg’s educational reform and the Circle of Münster -- Opening up for the renewal of Catholicism -- At the frontiers of faith: Catholic missions beyond the Atlantic -- References -- Chapter 13: Maria Kunigunde of Saxony (1740–1826): abbess, princess and industrial pioneer in the Free Secular Women’s College in Essen -- Misogynistic historiography -- Election as princess-abbess -- Maria Kunigunde’s rule -- Reforms -- Bibliography.
Chapter 14: Between revolutionary Jacobins and English Catholic Cisalpines: the roles of Elizabeth Inchbald (1753–1821) in the age of Enlightenment -- The Jacobin Inchbald and the Radical Enlightenment in England -- The Christian Inchbald and the English Catholic Enlightenment -- The nature of Inchbald’s art -- References -- Chapter 15: Fénelonian reform, Catholic Jacobites and Jane Barker’s Enlightenment dramas of conscience -- FranÃois Fénelon’s Catholic Reform and English Catholic Jacobites -- Social rupture and divided conscience in Barker’s poems -- The high romance of Barker’s Exilius -- Barker’s Jacobite retreat in A Patch-Work Screen for the Ladies -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 16: Izabela Czartoryska and Catholic devotion in the eighteenth-century Polish garden -- The swift madness of time -- Education in the garden -- Classics for the nation -- The Church of Memory and the sacred space -- Devotions for peasants -- Archival Source -- References -- Index.
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Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism- Front Cover -- Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism -- Title Page -- Copyright Page -- Contents -- List of figures -- Notes on contributors -- Women, Enlightenment and Catholicism: prolegomena -- Notes -- Chapter 1: Piety and popularity: the life and works of Félicité de Genlis (1746–1830) -- References -- Chapter 2: Marie Leprince de Beaumont (1711–1780): a popular religious pedagogue -- Intellectual sources and Enlightenment debates -- Religious and theological influences -- Pastoral ambitions: praxis versus theory -- European reception -- References -- Chapter 3: Adélaïde d’Orléans (1698–1743): the Abbess of Chelles -- House of Orléans -- Character -- A royal abbey -- Works and interests -- Life and fiction -- References -- Chapter 4: Josefa Amar y Borbón (1749–1833): an intellectual woman -- Self-critical Enlightenment: women’s reason and education -- Translation as public statement: choices and strategies -- Social activity and connections of an Enlightened Catholic -- Acknowledgment -- Bibliography -- Chapter 5: María Gertrudis Hore (1742–1801): the neoclassic poetry and Enlightenment thought of a cloistered Spanish nun -- Life as an Enlightened socialite-turned-nun -- Critical and historical reception -- The Anacreontic form in eighteenth-century Europe and Spain -- Hore’s Anacreontic poetry -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 6: María Lorenza de los Ríos y Loyo, Marquesa de Fuerte-Híjar: women’s writing and charity in the Spanish Enlightenment -- La niña de oro (The Golden Girl) -- Reforming charity for women -- The quandaries of changing gender roles -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 7: Teresa de Mello Breyner, Countess of Vimieiro (1739–1798?) -- The Countess of Vimieiro’s career in the political and cultural fields.

Catholicism as a cultural and political framework -- The presence of religion in the thought of the Countess of Vimieiro -- Religion and forbidden books -- A Catholic doxa -- References -- Chapter 8: Faith, science and the modern body: Anna Morandi’s studies of human anatomy in wax -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 9: The scientist and the saint: Laura Bassi’s Enlightened Catholicism -- Sanctifying Bologna -- Bassi’s Catholic formation -- Bless the children -- Reunited in the body of Christ -- Acknowledgment -- Notes -- Chapter 10: Maria Eleonora Sporck (1687−1717) and Anna Katharina Swéerts-Sporck (1689−1754): practitioners and promoters of the word at the edge of the Enlightenment -- Translating in service of cross-confessional “true Christianity” -- Interconnecting inner piety with social action -- Small-format book patronage -- From biographies of aspiring saints to the canon of learned men -- Note -- References -- Chapter 11: Between nation and universe: Caroline Pichler’s (1769−1843) Catholicism -- “Neither real Catholics nor real Austrians” -- Nation and devotion -- Mysticism and literature -- Women and religion -- References -- Chapter 12: Faith, education, renewal: Amalia von Gallitzin (1748–1806) -- Confessional and philosophical encounters at Berlin, Breslau and The Hague -- Emancipation through education -- Exploring new ways: Fürstenberg’s educational reform and the Circle of Münster -- Opening up for the renewal of Catholicism -- At the frontiers of faith: Catholic missions beyond the Atlantic -- References -- Chapter 13: Maria Kunigunde of Saxony (1740–1826): abbess, princess and industrial pioneer in the Free Secular Women’s College in Essen -- Misogynistic historiography -- Election as princess-abbess -- Maria Kunigunde’s rule -- Reforms -- Bibliography.

Chapter 14: Between revolutionary Jacobins and English Catholic Cisalpines: the roles of Elizabeth Inchbald (1753–1821) in the age of Enlightenment -- The Jacobin Inchbald and the Radical Enlightenment in England -- The Christian Inchbald and the English Catholic Enlightenment -- The nature of Inchbald’s art -- References -- Chapter 15: Fénelonian reform, Catholic Jacobites and Jane Barker’s Enlightenment dramas of conscience -- FranÃois Fénelon’s Catholic Reform and English Catholic Jacobites -- Social rupture and divided conscience in Barker’s poems -- The high romance of Barker’s Exilius -- Barker’s Jacobite retreat in A Patch-Work Screen for the Ladies -- Notes -- Bibliography -- Chapter 16: Izabela Czartoryska and Catholic devotion in the eighteenth-century Polish garden -- The swift madness of time -- Education in the garden -- Classics for the nation -- The Church of Memory and the sacred space -- Devotions for peasants -- Archival Source -- References -- Index.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Ulrich L. Lehner is Professor of Religious History and Historical Theology at Marquette University. A member of the European Academy of Sciences and Arts, he has received awards and fellowships from the Princeton Institute for Advanced Study, the Notre Dame Institute of Advanced Study, the Earhart Foundation, the German Humboldt Foundation and the Carl Friedrich von Siemens Foundation. He is the award-winning author of several scholarly works on early modern and modern history of religion.</p>

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