The William Hoy story : how a deaf baseball player changed the game / Nancy Churnin ; pictures by Jez Tuya.

By: Churnin, Nancy [author.]Contributor(s): Tuya, Jez [illustrator.]Material type: TextTextDescription: 32 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cmContent type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780807591925; 0807591920; 9780605973299; 0605973296Subject(s): Hoy, William, 1862-1961 -- Juvenile literature | Hoy, William, 1862-1961 | Hoy, William, 1862-1961 | 1862-1961. Hoy, William | Baseball players -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Deaf athletes -- United States -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Baseball signs and signals -- History -- Juvenile literature | Baseball players -- United States -- Biography | Deaf athletes -- United States -- Biography | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Language Arts -- Sign Language | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Social Topics -- Special Needs | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Sports & Recreation -- Baseball & Softball | Baseball signs and signals | Baseball players | Deaf athletes | Baseball players -- United States | Deaf athletes -- United States | United States | United StatesGenre/Form: Picture books. | History. | Picture books for children. | Biographies. | Biography. | Juvenile works. | Biographies.DDC classification: 796.35 | B LOC classification: GV865.H685 | C48 2016Other classification: I712.85 Awards: 2017 Texas 2x2 List.Summary: All William Ellsworth Hoy wanted to do was play baseball. After losing out on a spot on the local deaf team, William practiced even harder -- eventually earning a position on a professional team. But his struggle was far from over. In addition to the prejudice Hoy faced, he could not hear the umpires' calls. One day he asked the umpire to use hand signals: strike, ball, out. That day he not only got on base but also changed the way the game was played forever. William "Dummy" Hoy became one of the greatest and most beloved players of his time!
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
796.35 C5590wi (Browse shelf) Available 0000002248672

All William Ellsworth Hoy wanted to do was play baseball. After losing out on a spot on the local deaf team, William practiced even harder -- eventually earning a position on a professional team. But his struggle was far from over. In addition to the prejudice Hoy faced, he could not hear the umpires' calls. One day he asked the umpire to use hand signals: strike, ball, out. That day he not only got on base but also changed the way the game was played forever. William "Dummy" Hoy became one of the greatest and most beloved players of his time!

Ages 4-8.

2017 Texas 2x2 List.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

PreS-Gr 3-This picture book biography demonstrates how an extraordinary deaf player from the early days of baseball made a lasting contribution to the game. The ambitions of William Hoy (1862-1961) were clear from the start. The boy thought of little other than baseball and practiced tirelessly in hopes of playing on a team. Achieving his goal brought challenges that he didn't expect, but giving up was not an option. Hoy realized that better communication was needed and knew just the way to do it. While he was not the only person to introduce hand signals to the game, he did popularize their use among players and fans. The book is well told and charmingly illustrated in a semirealistic style that conveys Hoy's emotions. Those who enjoyed Audrey Vernick's Brothers at Bat: The True Story of an Amazing All-Brother Baseball Team (Clarion, 2012) will want to read this engaging biography. VERDICT This is the largely unknown story of a differently abled athlete's valuable addition to the great American pastime.-Paige Mellinger, Gwinnett County Public Libraries, Lillburn, GA © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Nancy Churnin writes a weekly column about kids' entertainment and is the theater critic for the Dallas Morning News . She also writes a special needs parenting blog. She lives in Texas. Jez Tuya is a self-taught illustrator who grew up in the Philippines. He lives in New Zealand.

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