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YUKO-CHAN AND THE DARUMA DOLL : the Adventures of a Blind Japanese Girl Who Saves Her Village /

Yuko-chan and the Daruma doll : the adventures of a blind Japanese girl who saves her village / story and illustrations by Sunny Seki.

By: Seki, Sunny, 1947-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Tokyo : Tuttle Pub., ©2012Edition: 1st ed.Description: 32 pages : color illustrations ; 29 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9784805311875; 4805311878.Subject(s): 1600 - 1868 | Picture books | Bodhidharma dolls -- Fiction | Dolls -- Fiction | Buddhist monasteries -- Fiction | Blind -- Fiction | People with disabilities -- Fiction | Orphans -- Fiction | Picture books | Dolls -- Fiction | Monasteries -- Fiction | Blind -- Fiction | Handicapped -- Fiction | Orphans -- Fiction | Japan -- History -- Tokugawa period, 1600-1868 -- Juvenile fiction | Japan -- History -- Tokugawa period, 1600-1868 -- Fiction | Japan | Japan -- History -- 0-1868 -- FictionGenre/Form: Literature. | Fiction. | History. | Juvenile works. | Children's nonfiction. | Fiction. | Literature. | Children's stories.DDC classification: [E] Other classification: 726.6 Summary: After the 1783 eruption of Japan's Mount Asama destroys crops in nearby villages, a orphaned blind girl who lives at the Daruma Temple in Takasaki invents a doll representing a famed Buddhist monk and his teachings about resilience.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Easy Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Easy Fiction Area
S463yu (Browse shelf) Available 0000002248474

Cultural notes are included on [p. 33].

After the 1783 eruption of Japan's Mount Asama destroys crops in nearby villages, a orphaned blind girl who lives at the Daruma Temple in Takasaki invents a doll representing a famed Buddhist monk and his teachings about resilience.

Parallel text in English and Japanese.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Daruma dolls are traditional Japanese talismans of good luck and resilience, often given as a gift to encourage the recipient to persevere in reaching a personal goal. The heartening sentiment behind them is expressed in this story. Yuko overcomes her disability to invent the Daruma doll, inspired by the founder of Zen Buddhism, and rescues her village from poverty through sales of the popular souvenirs. Although parts of the story are based on fact and well-known legend, Yuko's role is completely invented for this book, so readers seeking a traditional tale need to look elsewhere. For those simply wanting an uplifting story that includes elements of Japanese culture, however, this book fits the bill. Children with disabilities will appreciate Yuko, as her cleverness and resourcefulness outshine her physical limitations. Presented in both English and Japanese, the text is occasionally clumsy, but the story is pleasant enough. Some unexplained cultural references might puzzle readers unfamiliar with Japan, and the section of cultural notes would have been more useful within the narrative rather than in an afterword. Brilliantly colored and delightfully detailed illustrations are the true highlight here. The use of bold line gives the impression of woodblock prints and cleverly echoes the broad paint strokes that decorate Daruma dolls. Pages are attractively laid out, and characters' faces are expressive and slightly cartoonish, holding great appeal for young audiences.-Allison Tran, Mission Viejo Library, CA (c) Copyright 2012. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sunny Seki is the award-winning author and illustrator of The Last Kappa of Old Japan and The Tale of the Lucky Cat . A native of Japan, Sunny studied illustration at Pasadena Art Center of Design. Sunny presents his books and other Japanese folktales at festivals and schools, invigorating his storytelling through shadow puppetry. Sunny is the leader of a Japanese senryu poetry group. He published Gardeners' Pioneer Story, an account of the 100-year history of Japanese gardeners through the sensitive senryu poems created by this group of immigrants. Sunny is now documenting the milestones of Japanese Americans in North America, again through their senryu poetry. Sunny, his wife Judy and their nine children live in San Gabriel, CA.

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