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We are grateful : otsaliheliga / Traci Sorell ; Illustrated by Frané Lessac.

By: Sorell, Traci [author.].
Contributor(s): Lessac, Frané [illustrator.] | Charlesbridge (Firm) [publisher.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 28 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781580897723; 158089772X.Other title: Otsaliheliga.Subject(s): Cherokee Indians -- Juvenile literature | Cherokee language -- Juvenile literature | Cherokee Indians -- Religion -- Juvenile literature | Gratitude -- Juvenile literature | Seasons -- Juvenile literature | Cherokee Indians -- Juvenile literature | Cherokee language -- Juvenile literature | Cherokee Indians -- Religion -- Juvenile literature | Gratitude -- Juvenile literature | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- People & Places -- United States -- Native American | Seasons | Cherokee Indians | Cherokee Indians -- Religion | Cherokee language | Gratitude | Cherokee Indians | Cherokee language | Cherokee Indians -- Religion | GratitudeGenre/Form: Picture books for children. | Nonfiction. | Picture books. | Juvenile works. | Picture books.Additional physical formats: Online version:: We are grateful.DDC classification: 975.004 Other classification: JNF018040 | JNF013090 | JNF053200 Awards: ALSC Notable Children's Book, 2019 | Boston Globe/Horn Book Picture Book Honor, 2019 | Chicago Public Library Best Informational Books for Younger Readers, 2018 | CSMCL Best Books, 2018 | Kirkus Prize Nominee for Young Readers' Literature, 2018 | NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children Honor, 2019 | Notable Social Studies Trade Books, for Young People, 2019 | NPR Best Books, 2018 | Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor, 2019 | School Library Journal's Best Books, 2018Summary: Otsaliheliga is a Cherokee word that is used to express gratitude. Journey through the year with a Cherokee family and their tribal nation as they express thanks for celebrations big and small. This book presents a look at modern Native American life as told by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
975.004 S7130gr (Browse shelf) Available 0000002248573

Otsaliheliga is a Cherokee word that is used to express gratitude. Journey through the year with a Cherokee family and their tribal nation as they express thanks for celebrations big and small. This book presents a look at modern Native American life as told by a citizen of the Cherokee Nation.

Text in English and some in Cherokee.

ALSC Notable Children's Book, 2019

Boston Globe/Horn Book Picture Book Honor, 2019

Chicago Public Library Best Informational Books for Younger Readers, 2018

CSMCL Best Books, 2018

Kirkus Prize Nominee for Young Readers' Literature, 2018

NCTE Orbis Pictus Award for Outstanding Nonfiction for Children Honor, 2019

Notable Social Studies Trade Books, for Young People, 2019

NPR Best Books, 2018

Robert F. Sibert Informational Book Honor, 2019

School Library Journal's Best Books, 2018

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-Sorell, a citizen of the Cherokee Nation, offers readers a look at contemporary Cherokee life as she follows a family through the seasons of the year as they take part in ceremonies and festivals. The book opens, "Cherokee people say otsaliheliga to express gratitude. It is a reminder to celebrate our blessings and reflect on struggles-daily, throughout the year.." Beginning in the fall (uligohvsdi) with the Cherokee New Year, a variety of rituals and cultural symbols are introduced, all in spare, lyrical, accessible language. Traditional foods, crafts, and songs are part of the engaging narrative, as is the refrain, "we say otsaliheliga." Once through the calendar, Sorell circles back to the Cherokee National Holiday (Labor Day weekend), "when we recall the ancestors' sacrifices to preserve our way of life.. to celebrate nulistanidolv, history, and listen to our tribal leaders speak." Cherokee words are presented both phonetically and written in the Cherokee syllabary. Lessac's lovely gouache folk-art style paintings bring the scenes to life. Back matter includes a description of the various ceremonies, notes, and a page devoted to the Cherokee -syllabary. VERDICT This informative and authentic introduction to a thriving ancestral and ceremonial way of life is perfect for holiday and family sharing.-Luann Toth, School Library Journal © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Traci Sorell writes fiction and nonfiction for children featuring contemporary characters and compelling biographies. She is an enrolled citizen of the Cherokee Nation and lives in northeastern Oklahoma, where her tribe is located.<br> <br> Frané Lessac is the illustrator of more than forty books for children. She has lived on the small Caribbean island of Montserrat, in London, and in Australia, and her work has taken her on many adventures in numerous countries. www.franelessac.com

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