Normal view MARC view ISBD view

The black unicorn : poems / by Audre Lorde.

By: Lorde, Audre.
Material type: TextTextDescription: xi, 122 pages ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0393312372; 9780393312379.Subject(s): 1900-1999 | American poetry -- 20th century | American poetry | English poetry | United StatesDDC classification: 811.54
Contents:
I. The black unicorn -- A woman speaks -- From the house of Yemanjá -- Coniagui women -- A rock thrown into the water does not fear the cold -- Dahomey -- 125th Street and Abomey -- The women of Dan -- Sahara -- II. Harriet -- Chain -- Sequelae -- For Assata -- At first I thought you were talking about . . . -- A litany for survival -- Meet -- Seasoning -- Touring -- Walking our boundaries -- Eulogy for Alvin Frost -- Chorus -- Coping -- To Martha : a new year -- In Margaret's garden -- Scar -- Portrait -- A song for many movements -- Brother Alvin -- School note -- Digging -- III. Outside -- Therapy -- The same death over and over -- Ballad for ashes -- A woman/Dirge for wasted children -- Parting -- Timepiece -- Fog report -- Pathways : from mother to mother -- Death dance for a poet -- Dream/Songs from the moon of Beulah Land I-V -- Recreation -- Woman -- Timing -- Ghost -- Artisan -- Letter for Jan -- Bicentennial poem #21,000,000 -- IV. The old days -- Contact lenses -- Lightly -- Hanging fire -- But what can you teach my daughter -- From inside an empty purse -- A small slaughter -- From the greenhouse -- Journeystones I-XI -- About religion -- Sister outsider -- Bazaar -- Power -- Eulogy -- "Never take fire from a woman" -- Between ourselves -- Future promise -- The trollop maiden -- Solstice.
Summary: Collection of poems which serves as a testimony to the lives of women who have influenced the poet's life.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Two hour reserve University of Texas At Tyler
Reserves Desk - Circulation
PS3562.O75 B55 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247278
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Reserves Desk - Circulation Close shelf browser
LD5317 .A125 2014-2015 The University of Texas at Tyler Fact Book M4685JA Just a snowy day / PN1997.T785 2005 The Truman show. PS3562.O75 B55 1995 The black unicorn : PS3566 .O69 M9 2000 My name is Asher Lev / Q181 .F85 1995, V.26 Water / QA76.9.I52 K64 2015 Storytelling with data :

Includes bibliographical references (page 122).

I. The black unicorn -- A woman speaks -- From the house of Yemanjá -- Coniagui women -- A rock thrown into the water does not fear the cold -- Dahomey -- 125th Street and Abomey -- The women of Dan -- Sahara -- II. Harriet -- Chain -- Sequelae -- For Assata -- At first I thought you were talking about . . . -- A litany for survival -- Meet -- Seasoning -- Touring -- Walking our boundaries -- Eulogy for Alvin Frost -- Chorus -- Coping -- To Martha : a new year -- In Margaret's garden -- Scar -- Portrait -- A song for many movements -- Brother Alvin -- School note -- Digging -- III. Outside -- Therapy -- The same death over and over -- Ballad for ashes -- A woman/Dirge for wasted children -- Parting -- Timepiece -- Fog report -- Pathways : from mother to mother -- Death dance for a poet -- Dream/Songs from the moon of Beulah Land I-V -- Recreation -- Woman -- Timing -- Ghost -- Artisan -- Letter for Jan -- Bicentennial poem #21,000,000 -- IV. The old days -- Contact lenses -- Lightly -- Hanging fire -- But what can you teach my daughter -- From inside an empty purse -- A small slaughter -- From the greenhouse -- Journeystones I-XI -- About religion -- Sister outsider -- Bazaar -- Power -- Eulogy -- "Never take fire from a woman" -- Between ourselves -- Future promise -- The trollop maiden -- Solstice.

Collection of poems which serves as a testimony to the lives of women who have influenced the poet's life.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

An African American lesbian feminist critic and writer, Lorde was born in Harlem and educated at National University of Mexico, Hunter College, and Columbia University. She married in 1962 and divorced in 1970, after having two children. Lorde first came to critical attention with her poetry. Her first poem was published in Seventeen magazine while she was in high school; it had been rejected by her high school newspaper because it was "too romantic" (Lorde considered her "mature" poetry, which focuses on her lesbian relationships, to be romantic also). Other early poems were published in many different journals, many of them under the pseudonym Rey Domini. Her first volume of poetry, "The First Cities," was published in 1968. Lorde then quit her job as head librarian at a school in New York City in order to devote her time to teaching and writing. She was a professor of English at Hunter College from 1980 until her untimely death from cancer in 1992. <p> Although many of Lorde's poems are about love, many are about anger, particularly anger about racism, sexism, and homophobia in America. "The Brown Menace or Poem to the Survival of Roaches" likens African Americans to cockroaches---hated, feared, and poisoned by whites but survivors nevertheless. Other poems express a daughter's anger toward her mother; still others eschew anger for affirmation and inspiration, which are represented as coming from lesbian love and traditional African myths because, as Lorde has said, "the master's tools will not dismantle the master's house." Lorde is also well known for her prose. Her courageous account of her struggle with breast cancer and the mastectomy that she underwent is movingly chronicled in "The Cancer Journals" (1980), her first major prose publication. "Zami, a New Spelling of My Name" (1982) is, in Lorde's words, a "biomythography," combining history, biography, and myth. In "Zami," Lorde focuses on her developing lesbian identity and her response to racism in the white feminist and gay communities, and to sexism and homophobia in the African American community. Lorde's critical essays, collected in "Sister/Outsider" (1984) and "A Burst of Light "(1988), have been quite influential, particularly "Uses of the Erotic: The Erotic as Power," in which she discusses the relationship of poetry to politics and the erotic. <p> Lorde was the recipient of several grants---from the National Endowment for the Arts in 1968 and 1981 and from the Creative Artists Public Service in 1972---as well as the Borough of Manhattan President's Award for Literary Excellence in 1987. She was also nominated for the National Book Award for poetry in 1974 for her third volume of verse, "From a Land Where Other People Live"(1973). <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.