Fish for Jimmy : inspired by one family's experience in a Japanese American internment camp / Katie Yamasaki.

By: Yamasaki, KatieMaterial type: TextTextPublisher: New York : Holiday House, ©2013Edition: 1st edDescription: 1 volume (unpaged) : color illustrations ; 24 x 28 cmContent type: still image | text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780823423750; 0823423751Other title: Inspired by one family's experience in a Japanese American internment campSubject(s): Evacuation and relocation of Japanese Americans (United States : 1942-1945) | 1942-1945 | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Juvenile fiction | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- Fiction | Brothers -- Fiction | Japanese Americans | Brothers -- Fiction | Japanese Americans -- Evacuation and relocation, 1942-1945 -- FictionGenre/Form: Fiction. | Picture books for children. | Fiction. | Juvenile works.DDC classification: [E] LOC classification: PZ7.Y19157 | Fi 2013Awards: NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People: History, Life & Culture in the Americas (2014).Summary: When brothers Taro and Jimmy and their mother are forced to move from their home in California to a Japanese internment camp in the wake of the 1941 Pearl Harbor bombing, Taro daringly escapes the camp to find fresh fish for his grieving brother.
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CML Juvenile Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
Y19ji (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247294

When brothers Taro and Jimmy and their mother are forced to move from their home in California to a Japanese internment camp in the wake of the 1941 Pearl Harbor bombing, Taro daringly escapes the camp to find fresh fish for his grieving brother.

NCSS Notable Social Studies Trade Books for Young People: History, Life & Culture in the Americas (2014).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 1-3-Following the bombing of Pearl Harbor, Taro's father is taken away for questioning by the FBI, and Taro, his younger brother, and their mother are transported to an internment camp. Jimmy refuses to eat and becomes withdrawn and listless. Taro finds a way to slip outside the camp fences to obtain fresh fish to entice his brother to eat. While the story is moving, it is the acrylic illustrations that are exceptional. The style has a primitive quality, with expressive facial details and body positioning. Yamasaki combines representational and abstract elements in her images. Children will be intrigued immediately by the cover. Taro is picking up fish that have small human figures sleeping on them. Readers soon discover that the figure is Jimmy. By combining what the characters are doing with what they are thinking, the illustrations invite viewers into a deeper level of connection with the story. Space and scale also are used imaginatively. The scene in which Taro leaves the camp is shown as a spread. His movement is demonstrated by four small images of him running, avoiding spotlights and guards. A larger Taro cutting a hole in the fence is the focal point of the painting. Another scene in which Taro is considering how to help Jimmy provides the visual clue of "fish" in an intriguing manner. Although the story is appropriate for a slightly younger audience than Ken Mochizuki's Baseball Saved Us (Lee & Low, 1993) and Eve Bunting's So Far from the Sea (Clarion, 1998), the sophisticated visual images have cross-generational appeal. This book would be appreciated by young children, middle school students learning more about internment camps, and anyone interested in how art can explore emotion.-Lucinda Snyder Whitehurst, St. Christopher's School, Richmond, VA (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Katie Yamasaki is a muralist, author, and teacher. When she was growing up, the World War II internment of 110,000 Japanese and Japanese American citizens was never discussed in school--even though most of Katie's Japanese family was interned. Inspired by her family's history, she wrote Fish for Jimmy to honor their bravery and the memory of those like them. Based in Brooklyn, New York, she travels widely across the world to paint in and work with diverse communities. She is passionate about art as dialogue and storytelling.

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