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I am not a number / written by Jenny Kay Dupuis and Kathy Kacer ; illustrated by Gillian Newland.

By: Dupuis, Jenny Kay [author.].
Contributor(s): Cole, Kathryn [editor.] | Kacer, Kathy, 1954- [author.] | Newland, Gillian [illustrator.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: 32 unnumbered pages : illustrations (chiefly colour), portraits (some colour) ; 29 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781927583944; 1927583942.Subject(s): Indigenous peoples -- Canada -- Juvenile fiction | Off-reservation boarding schools -- Canada -- Juvenile fiction | Indigenous peoples -- Canada -- Juvenile fiction | Off-reservation boarding schools -- Canada -- Juvenile fiction | Native peoples -- Canada -- Residential schools -- Juvenile fiction | Internats pour autochtones -- Canada -- Romans, nouvelles, etc. pour la jeunesse | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Canada -- History -- Canada | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- People & Places -- United States -- Native American | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Social Topics -- Prejudice & Racism | Indigenous peoples | Off-reservation boarding schools | First Nations -- Residential schools -- Juvenile fiction | First Nations -- Residential schools -- Biography | Native peoples -- Fiction | Off-reservation boarding schools -- Fiction | Indigenous peoples -- Fiction | CanadaGenre/Form: Picture books. | Sophisticated picture books. | Fiction. | Juvenile works. | Picture books. | Picture books. | Fiction.DDC classification: jC813/.6 LOC classification: PZ7.1.D87 | Iam 2016Other classification: cci1icc | coll13 Awards: American Library Association Notable Children's Book: Middle Readers; 2017. | Oklahoma Library Association: Silver Birch Award Nominee; 2018.Summary: "A picture book based on a true story about a young First Nations girl who was sent to a residential school. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite the efforts of the nuns to force her to do otherwise. Based on the life of Jenny Kay Dupuis' own grandmother, I Am Not a Number brings a terrible part of Canada's history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to"--
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Juvenile Fiction Longview campus
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
D944nu (Browse shelf) Available 0000002249498
CML Juvenile Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
D944nu (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247302

"Editor: Kathryn Cole"--Colophon.

"A picture book based on a true story about a young First Nations girl who was sent to a residential school. When eight-year-old Irene is removed from her First Nations family to live in a residential school she is confused, frightened, and terribly homesick. She tries to remember who she is and where she came from despite the efforts of the nuns to force her to do otherwise. Based on the life of Jenny Kay Dupuis' own grandmother, I Am Not a Number brings a terrible part of Canada's history to light in a way that children can learn from and relate to"--

American Library Association Notable Children's Book: Middle Readers; 2017.

Oklahoma Library Association: Silver Birch Award Nominee; 2018.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-A spotlight on the injustice of Canada's residential school program based on Dupuis's grandmother's childhood experience. The story begins in medias res: the front door is open, and a gruff white man is demanding that Irene Couchie's parents hand over their children-now "wards of the government." Couchie and her two brothers are taken from their home on Nipissing First Nation to attend a residential boarding school many miles away. Couchie learns that names are not allowed at this school; she becomes number 759. Subdued illustrations assist in setting the overall serious tone. The facial expressions of Couchie throughout the year bring the raw hopelessness of the situation to light. Many scenes are alarming; for example, Sister Mary is shown cutting a crying Couchie's hair off. After the kids return home for the summer, Couchie's parents vow to hide their children from the government and the "Indian Agent" sent to recollect them. Back matter contains material on Canada's residential school system, which "educated" indigenous peoples, and the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission condemning the practice in 2015. Dupuis also provides more information about her grandmother. VERDICT Pair this recommended selection with Nicola I. Campbell's Shi-shi-etko for students learning about the boarding school system.-Amy Zembroski, Indian Community School, Franklin, WI © Copyright 2016. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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