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This promise of change : one girl's story in the fight for school equality / Jo Ann Allen Boyce and Debbie Levy.

By: Boyce, Jo Ann Allen [author.].
Contributor(s): Levy, Debbie [author.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: 310 pages : illustrations ; 22 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781681198521; 1681198525.Subject(s): Boyce, Jo Ann Allen -- Juvenile literature | Boyce, Jo Ann Allen -- Juvenile literature | African American teenage girls -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African American students -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | School integration -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Juvenile literature | Segregation -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Juvenile literature | African American teenage girls -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African American students -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | School integration -- Tennessee -- Clinton -- Juvenile literature | African American teenage girls -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | African American students -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | School integration -- Juvenile literature | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Biography & Autobiography / Social Activists | JUVENILE NONFICTION / History / United States / 20th Century | JUVENILE NONFICTION / Social Topics / Prejudice & Racism | Segregation | African American teenage girls | Race relations | School integration | African American youth -- Tennessee -- Biography | School integration -- Tennessee | Clinton (Tenn.) -- Race relations -- Juvenile literature | Clinton (Tenn.) -- Race relations -- Juvenile literature | Tennessee -- Clinton | Tennessee -- Race relationsGenre/Form: Juvenile literature. | Narrative poetry. | Didactic poetry. | Autobiographies. | Biography. | Juvenile works. | Autobiographies. | Narrative poetry. | Didactic poetry.Additional physical formats: Online version:: This promise of changeDDC classification: 379.2/630976873
Contents:
Introduction -- Mine, theirs, and ours -- Me, myself, and I -- Getting ready (May to August 1956) -- Down the hill (late August to Labor Day) -- Try again (three weeks in September) -- Fear (late September to mid-November) -- Going downhill (mid-November to December) -- Epilogue.
Awards: Boston Globe/Horn Book Nonfiction Award, 2019Summary: "In 1956, one year before federal troops escorted the Little Rock 9 into Central High School, fourteen year old Jo Ann Allen was one of twelve African-American students who broke the color barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee. At first things went smoothly for the Clinton 12, but then outside agitators interfered, pitting the townspeople against one another. Uneasiness turned into anger, and even the Clinton 12 themselves wondered if the easier thing to do would be to go back to their old school. Jo Ann--clear-eyed, practical, tolerant, and popular among both black and white students--found herself called on as the spokesperson of the group. But what about just being a regular teen? This is the heartbreaking and relatable story of her four months thrust into the national spotlight and as a trailblazer in history. Based on original research and interviews and featuring backmatter with archival materials and notes from the authors on the co-writing process"--
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Adolescent Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Adolescent Fiction Area
B789pr (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247245

Includes bibliographical references.

Introduction -- Mine, theirs, and ours -- Me, myself, and I -- Getting ready (May to August 1956) -- Down the hill (late August to Labor Day) -- Try again (three weeks in September) -- Fear (late September to mid-November) -- Going downhill (mid-November to December) -- Epilogue.

"In 1956, one year before federal troops escorted the Little Rock 9 into Central High School, fourteen year old Jo Ann Allen was one of twelve African-American students who broke the color barrier and integrated Clinton High School in Tennessee. At first things went smoothly for the Clinton 12, but then outside agitators interfered, pitting the townspeople against one another. Uneasiness turned into anger, and even the Clinton 12 themselves wondered if the easier thing to do would be to go back to their old school. Jo Ann--clear-eyed, practical, tolerant, and popular among both black and white students--found herself called on as the spokesperson of the group. But what about just being a regular teen? This is the heartbreaking and relatable story of her four months thrust into the national spotlight and as a trailblazer in history. Based on original research and interviews and featuring backmatter with archival materials and notes from the authors on the co-writing process"--

Age 10-12.

Grade level 4-6.

Boston Globe/Horn Book Nonfiction Award, 2019

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-8-This evocatively told, carefully researched memoir-in-verse is the story of a group of 12 teenagers from Clinton, TN, who, in 1956, were among the first black students to pave the way for school integration. Free verse and formal poetry, along with newspaper headlines, snippets of legislation, and other primary sources about national and local history are mixed with Boyce's first-person narrative. The book opens with an overview of life in segregated Clinton and the national events leading up to the desegregation of Clinton High. The rest of the work follows the four months in the fall of 1956 when Boyce and the other 11 teens attended Clinton High. They faced angry white mobs outside the school, constant harassment from white classmates, and a hostile principal who viewed integration as a legal choice rather than a moral one. The book includes an introduction and epilogue, authors' notes, brief biographies of the involved students, photographs, a time line, and a bibliography. The writing invites readers to cheer on Boyce for her optimism and her stubbornness in the face of racism, without singling her out as a solitary hero. This story adeptly shows readers that, like the Clinton Twelve, they too can be part of something greater than themselves. VERDICT A must-buy for tweens and teens, especially where novels-in-verse are popular.-Erica Ruscio, formerly at Rockport Public Library, MA © Copyright 2018. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p> Debbie Levy is the author of many books, including I Dissent; The Year of Goodbyes: A True Story of Friendship, Family, and Farewells; and Imperfect Spiral. She lives in the Chesapeake Bay area.</p> <br> <p> Jo Ann Allen Boyce was one of twelve students to desegragate Clinton High School in 1956. She has worked as a professional singer and a nurse. She lives in Los Angeles.</p>

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