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Romantic imperialism : universal empire and the culture of modernity / Saree Makdisi.

By: Makdisi, Saree.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Cambridge studies in Romanticism: 27.Publisher: Cambridge, United Kingdom ; New York : Cambridge University Press, 1998Description: xv, 248 pages : illustrations ; 24 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0521584388; 9780521584388; 0521586046; 9780521586047.Subject(s): Imperialism in literature | Literature and society -- Great Britain | Modernism (Literature) -- Great Britain | Romanticism -- Great Britain | Colonies in literature | Impérialisme dans la littérature | Littérature et société -- Grande-Bretagne | Modernisme (Littérature) -- Grande-Bretagne | Romantisme -- Grande-Bretagne | Colonies dans la littératureDDC classification: 820.9/007 Other classification: 18.05
Contents:
Introduction: Universal Empire -- Home imperial: Wordsworth's London and the spot of time -- Wordsworth and the image of Nature -- Waverley and the cultural politics of dispossession -- Domesticating exoticism: transformations of Britain's Orient, 1785-1835 -- Beyond the realm of dreams: Bryon, Shelley, and the East -- William Blake and the Universal Empire -- Conclusions.
Summary: The years between 1790 and 1830 saw over a hundred and fifty million people brought under British imperial control, and one of the most momentous outbursts of British literary and artistic production, announcing a new world of social and individual traumas and possibilities. This book traces the emergence of new forms of imperialism and capitalism as part of a culture of modernisation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, and looks at the ways in which they were identified with and contested in Romanticism. Saree Makdisi argues that this process has to be understood in global terms, beyond the British and European viewpoint, and that developments in India, Africa, and the Arab world (up to and including our own time) enable us to understand more fully the texts and contexts of British Romanticism. New and original readings of texts by Wordsworth, Blake, Byron, Shelley, and Scott emerge in the course of this searching analysis of the cultural process of globalisation. Choice Outstanding Academic Book of 1998.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
New book University of Texas At Tyler
New book shelf - 2nd Floor
PR468.I49 M35 1998 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247070

Includes bibliographical references (pages 186-243) and index.

Introduction: Universal Empire -- Home imperial: Wordsworth's London and the spot of time -- Wordsworth and the image of Nature -- Waverley and the cultural politics of dispossession -- Domesticating exoticism: transformations of Britain's Orient, 1785-1835 -- Beyond the realm of dreams: Bryon, Shelley, and the East -- William Blake and the Universal Empire -- Conclusions.

The years between 1790 and 1830 saw over a hundred and fifty million people brought under British imperial control, and one of the most momentous outbursts of British literary and artistic production, announcing a new world of social and individual traumas and possibilities. This book traces the emergence of new forms of imperialism and capitalism as part of a culture of modernisation in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century, and looks at the ways in which they were identified with and contested in Romanticism. Saree Makdisi argues that this process has to be understood in global terms, beyond the British and European viewpoint, and that developments in India, Africa, and the Arab world (up to and including our own time) enable us to understand more fully the texts and contexts of British Romanticism. New and original readings of texts by Wordsworth, Blake, Byron, Shelley, and Scott emerge in the course of this searching analysis of the cultural process of globalisation. Choice Outstanding Academic Book of 1998.

English.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

In this fascinating study, Makdise (Univ. of Chicago) persuasively argues that romanticism emerges along with and in response to modernization and imperialism, that it marks a great historical crossroads between "one cultural moment and another." According to the author, romantic writers were situated at a particular historical moment when they could see--but still resist--the emerging forces of modernization and imperialism (what Blake called "Universal Empire"). As the modern emerges, so does it opposite, "the Other": "wilderness," "nature," "the primitive." Romantics like Blake and Wordsworth see that Other as a potential alternative to the modern. Makdisi's readings of Wordsworth offer lucid explanations of his project, and her chapter on Waverley reveals how Scott creates an image of the highlands at the very moment when the clearances were eradicating highland. Through his fiction, Scott, a Tory, actually participates in an imperialist project, unlike Wordsworth and Blake, whose work resists that project. Makdisi's brilliant reading of Blake's poem "London" connects neatly to her discussion of Wordsworth's reaction to that great center of empire and ties much of her work together. Includes extensive notes and bibliography. Highly recommended for upper-level undergraduates readers and above. S. F. Klepetar; St. Cloud State University

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