Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Krysia : a Polish girl's stolen childhood during World War II / Krystyna Mihulka with Krystyna Poray Goddu.

By: Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- [author.].
Contributor(s): Goddu, Krystyna Poray [co-author.].
Material type: TextTextDescription: xvii, 171 pages : illustrations, map, portraits ; 23 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781613734414; 1613734417.Subject(s): Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- -- Childhood and youth -- Juvenile literature | Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- -- Family -- Juvenile literature | Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- -- Childhood and youth | Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- -- Family | Mihulka, Krystyna, 1930- -- Childhood and youth | World War (1914-1918) | World War (1939-1945) | 1900-1999 | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Polish -- Juvenile literature | Girls -- Poland -- Lwów -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | World War, 1914-1918 -- Deportations from Poland -- Juvenile literature | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Soviet -- Juvenile literature | Collective farms -- Kazakhstan -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | Forced labor -- Kazakhstan -- History -- 20th century -- Juvenile literature | World War, 1939-1945 -- Refugees -- Juvenile literature | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Polish | World War, 1914-1918 -- Deportations from Poland | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Soviet | Collective farms -- Kazakhstan -- History -- 20th century | Forced labor -- Kazakhstan -- History -- 20th century | World War, 1939-1945 -- Refugees | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Biography & Autobiography -- Women | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- Biography & Autobiography -- Historical | JUVENILE NONFICTION -- History -- Europe | World War, 1939-1945 -- Refugees | World War, 1939-1945 -- Prisoners and prisons, Soviet | World War, 1939-1945 -- Personal narratives, Polish | World War, 1914-1918 -- Deportations from Poland | Girls -- Poland -- Lwow -- Biography | Forced labor -- Kazakhstan -- History -- 20th century | Collective farms | Deportation | Families | Forced labor | Girls | Refugees | Lwów (Poland) -- Biography -- Juvenile literature | Lwow (Poland) | Kazakhstan | Poland | Ukraine -- LʹvivGenre/Form: Autobiographies. | Nonfiction. | Autobiographies. | Autobiographies. | Biography. | History. | Juvenile works. | Personal narratives -- Polish.Additional physical formats: Online version:: Krysia.DDC classification: 940.53/4779 | B Other classification: JNF007120 | JNF007020 | JNF025070
Contents:
Map: Krysia's Journey (1940-1942) -- A Polish Pronunciation and Vocabulary Guide -- Author's Note -- Prologue -- Part One: The End of Life As We Knew It -- Hints of Impending War -- The Last Autumn of Peace -- Strangers in the Sky -- Life Under Russian Occupation -- Shadows in the Night -- Part Two: Journey into Captivity -- Traveling by Cattle Car -- Traveling by Ox Cart -- Part Three: Life in Captivity -- Settling In -- Strange Happenings at Night -- Enduring the Winter -- Spring and Summer Surprises -- Part Four: Flight to Freedom -- Reunion and Departure -- A Seemingly Endless Wait -- The Trans-Siberian Train Journey -- Tragedy Strikes Home -- Setting Sail for Freedom -- Afterword -- Epilogue -- A Guide to Geographical Names.
Scope and content: "Few people are aware that in the aftermath of German and Soviet invasions and division of Poland, more than 1.5 million people were deported from their homes in Eastern Poland to remote parts of Russia. Half of them died in labor camps and prisons or simply vanished, some were drafted into the Russian army, and a small number returned to Poland after the war. Those who made it out of Russia alive were lucky--and nine-year-old Krystyna Mihulka was among them. In this childhood memoir, Mihulka tells of her family's deportation, under cover of darkness and at gunpoint, and their life as prisoners on a Soviet communal farm in Kazakhstan, where they endured starvation and illness and witnessed death for more than two years. This untold history is revealed through the eyes of a young girl struggling to survive and to understand the increasingly harsh world in which she finds herself"--
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Dewey University of Texas At Tyler
CML Dewey Area
811.5 M618kr (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247781

Map: Krysia's Journey (1940-1942) -- A Polish Pronunciation and Vocabulary Guide -- Author's Note -- Prologue -- Part One: The End of Life As We Knew It -- Hints of Impending War -- The Last Autumn of Peace -- Strangers in the Sky -- Life Under Russian Occupation -- Shadows in the Night -- Part Two: Journey into Captivity -- Traveling by Cattle Car -- Traveling by Ox Cart -- Part Three: Life in Captivity -- Settling In -- Strange Happenings at Night -- Enduring the Winter -- Spring and Summer Surprises -- Part Four: Flight to Freedom -- Reunion and Departure -- A Seemingly Endless Wait -- The Trans-Siberian Train Journey -- Tragedy Strikes Home -- Setting Sail for Freedom -- Afterword -- Epilogue -- A Guide to Geographical Names.

"Few people are aware that in the aftermath of German and Soviet invasions and division of Poland, more than 1.5 million people were deported from their homes in Eastern Poland to remote parts of Russia. Half of them died in labor camps and prisons or simply vanished, some were drafted into the Russian army, and a small number returned to Poland after the war. Those who made it out of Russia alive were lucky--and nine-year-old Krystyna Mihulka was among them. In this childhood memoir, Mihulka tells of her family's deportation, under cover of darkness and at gunpoint, and their life as prisoners on a Soviet communal farm in Kazakhstan, where they endured starvation and illness and witnessed death for more than two years. This untold history is revealed through the eyes of a young girl struggling to survive and to understand the increasingly harsh world in which she finds herself"--

Ages 10 to 13.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-7-In 1940, nine-year-old Mihulka and her mother and younger brother were forced from their home in Poland and taken to a Soviet-run labor camp in Kazakhstan. Through Mihulka's mother's resourcefulness and the children's resilience, they survived the harsh conditions and were able to reconnect with family members before traveling to a refugee camp in Iran in 1942. Writing in a simple, direct style, Mihulka shares her experiences, fears, and reactions in a clear yet age-appropriate way. A guide to selected Polish words, along with their pronunciations, is placed at the beginning of this volume, giving tweens a chance to glance through it before diving into the narrative. Black-and-white photographs are scattered throughout, and a helpful map of the family's journey is also included. An afterword and epilogue give insight into the fates of many Polish people during World War II, as well as additional information about Mihulka and her family. VERDICT Painting a vivid picture of a child's experience as a civilian caught among warring powers, Mihulka's story offers many opportunities for discussion, especially given the current refugee crisis.-Sarah Reid, Four County Library System, NY © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in 1930, Krystyna Mihulka was deported from Poland to a remote village in Kazakhstan in 1940, where she lived as a political prisoner under Communist rule for nearly two years. After several years in refugee camps in Iran and Africa, she settled in Zambia, where she married and had three children. In 1969 she and her family migrated to the United States. She lives in Pleasant Hill, California, under her married name, Christine Tomerson. <br> <br> Krystyna Poray Goddu is the author of A Girl Called Vincent and Dollmakers and Their Stories , among others. She has contributed to American Girl magazine, the New York Times Book Review , Publishers Weekly , and other publications. She lives in New York City.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.