Good-bye Marianne : the graphic novel / Irene N. Watts ; illustrated by Kathryn E. Shoemaker.

By: Watts, Irene N [author.]Contributor(s): Shoemaker, Kathryn E [illustrator.]Material type: TextTextDescription: 124 pages : illustrations ; 26 cmContent type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780887768309; 088776830XSubject(s): Jewish children in the Holocaust -- Germany -- Juvenile fiction | Enfants juifs pendant l'Holocauste -- Allemagne -- Romans, nouvelles, etc. pour la jeunesse | Kindertransports (Opérations de sauvetage) -- Romans, nouvelles, etc. pour la jeunesse | Romans graphiquesDDC classification: 812/.54 LOC classification: PZ7.7.W377 | Goo 2008PN6727.W386 | G66 2008Summary: Eleven-year-old Marianne Kohn is living in 1938 Berlin when she is locked out of her school, synagogues are looted and her father goes into hiding. As the violence escalates, Marianne resists her mother's decision to send her away to safety.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Juvenile Fiction University of Texas At Tyler
CML Juvenile Fiction Area
W3480ma (Browse shelf) Available 0000002247757
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W2575MI Mike's oil patch / W2595B The biggest bear / W3395KI A king's ransom / W3480ma Good-bye Marianne : W421J The jazz man / W5336WI The wild horses of Hidden Valley / W582LI Little Audrey /

Eleven-year-old Marianne Kohn is living in 1938 Berlin when she is locked out of her school, synagogues are looted and her father goes into hiding. As the violence escalates, Marianne resists her mother's decision to send her away to safety.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

Gr 4-6-This brief novel opens in Berlin in November, 1938, as 11-year-old Marianne Kohn is forced to leave school because Jewish children are no longer allowed to attend classes with Aryans. She becomes friends with a boy who is visiting in her building, but later learns that Ernest belongs to the Jung Volk, the boy's branch of the Hitler Youth. Their friendship, however, has a contrived happy ending. Meanwhile, Marianne's mother, a volunteer at an orphanage, is busy making arrangements for a Kindertransport, in which hundreds of German Jewish children will be sent to safety in England. When one of the youngsters becomes ill, Mrs. Kohn makes it possible for Marianne to take her place. The story ends as the girl boards the boat taking her to England. Readers are left wondering what happens to her. Even though Watts herself was a participant in a Kindertransport, the story lacks vitality and immediacy. The characterizations are predictable; the story line is slight. Olga Drucker's Kindertransport (Holt, 1992) is a much better choice, giving a more complete portrait of life during this terrible time.-Malka Keck, The Temple Tifereth Israel, Beachwood, OH (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Born in Berlin, Germany, Irene Watts was sent to Britain on a kindertransport . Now living in Canada, she is a writer, award-winning playwright, and director who has worked in Canada and Europe in theatre for young audiences.

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