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Barbarian days : a surfing life / William Finnegan.

By: Finnegan, William [author.].
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Penguin Books, 2016Copyright date: ©2015Description: 447 pages : illustrations ; 21 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 0143109391; 9780143109396.Subject(s): Finnegan, William | Finnegan, William | Surfers -- United States -- Biography | Surfing | Surfers | United StatesGenre/Form: Autobiographies. | Biography. | Autobiographies.DDC classification: 797.3/2092 | B LOC classification: GV838.F58 | A3 2016
Contents:
Off Diamond Head (Honolulu, 1966-67) -- Smell the ocean (California, ca. 1956-65) -- The shock of the new (California, 1968) -- 'Scuse me while I kiss the sky (Maui, 1971) -- The search (The South Pacific, 1978) -- The lucky country (Australia, 1978-79) -- Choosing Ethiopia (Asia, Africa, 1979-81) -- Against dereliction (San Francisco, 1983-86) -- Basso profundo (Madeira, 1994-2003) -- The mountains fall into the heart of the sea (New York City, 2002-15).
Awards: Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography, 2016Summary: Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves. Finnegan shares stories of life in a whites-only gang in a tough school in Honolulu even while his closest friend was a native Hawaiian surfer. He shows us a world turned upside down for kids and adults alike by the social upheavals of the 1960s. He details the intricacies of famous waves and his own apprenticeships to them. Youthful folly -- he drops LSD while riding huge Honolua Bay, on Maui -- is served up with rueful humor. He and a buddy, their knapsacks crammed with reef charts, bushwhack through Polynesia. They discover, while camping on an uninhabited island in Fiji, one of the world's greatest waves. As Finnegan's travels take him ever farther afield, he becomes an improbable anthropologist: unpicking the picturesque simplicity of a Samoan fishing village, dissecting the sexual politics of Tongan interactions with Americans and Japanese, navigating the Indonesian black market while nearly succumbing to malaria. Throughout, he surfs.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
GV838.F58 A3 2016 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002248789
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
GV706.4 .S68 1995 Sport psychology : GV706.4 .V47 2003 Inner strength : GV711.5 .E88 2016 Essentials of strength training and conditioning / GV838.F58 A3 2016 Barbarian days : GV838.L68 A3 1996 Breaking the surface / GV838.67.T73 B39 2016 Swimming : GV867.6 .R38 1994 Heads-up baseball :

Off Diamond Head (Honolulu, 1966-67) -- Smell the ocean (California, ca. 1956-65) -- The shock of the new (California, 1968) -- 'Scuse me while I kiss the sky (Maui, 1971) -- The search (The South Pacific, 1978) -- The lucky country (Australia, 1978-79) -- Choosing Ethiopia (Asia, Africa, 1979-81) -- Against dereliction (San Francisco, 1983-86) -- Basso profundo (Madeira, 1994-2003) -- The mountains fall into the heart of the sea (New York City, 2002-15).

Surfing only looks like a sport. To initiates, it is something else entirely: a beautiful addiction, a demanding course of study, a morally dangerous pastime, a way of life. Raised in California and Hawaii, Finnegan started surfing as a child. He has chased waves all over the world, wandering for years through the South Pacific, Australia, Asia, Africa. A bookish boy, and then an excessively adventurous young man, he went on to become a writer and war reporter. Barbarian Days takes us deep into unfamiliar worlds, some of them right under our noses -- off the coasts of New York and San Francisco. It immerses the reader in the edgy camaraderie of close male friendships annealed in challenging waves. Finnegan shares stories of life in a whites-only gang in a tough school in Honolulu even while his closest friend was a native Hawaiian surfer. He shows us a world turned upside down for kids and adults alike by the social upheavals of the 1960s. He details the intricacies of famous waves and his own apprenticeships to them. Youthful folly -- he drops LSD while riding huge Honolua Bay, on Maui -- is served up with rueful humor. He and a buddy, their knapsacks crammed with reef charts, bushwhack through Polynesia. They discover, while camping on an uninhabited island in Fiji, one of the world's greatest waves. As Finnegan's travels take him ever farther afield, he becomes an improbable anthropologist: unpicking the picturesque simplicity of a Samoan fishing village, dissecting the sexual politics of Tongan interactions with Americans and Japanese, navigating the Indonesian black market while nearly succumbing to malaria. Throughout, he surfs.

Pulitzer Prize for Biography or Autobiography, 2016

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Finnegan (staff writer, The New Yorker; Cold New World) recounts his experiences as a surfer, beginning with his teen years surfing in Hawaii, covering his globe-trotting search for the perfect wave, and concluding with his current lifestyle fitting waves in between work and family. Traveling to Samoa, Fiji, South Africa, and Madeira among other places, Finnegan chronicles the obsession that drives surfers like himself to take on the dangers of sharks, wipeouts, and near drowning all in pursuit of the heightened experience that surfing provides. The constants flowing through this part coming-of-age story and part travelog are the ocean and the waves that the author tries to better understand. The result is an up-close and personal homage to the surfing lifestyle through the author's journey as a lifelong surfer. Finnegan's writing is polished and bold, but the lengthy descriptions of individual waves and their personalities may be daunting to the average reader. -VERDICT This high-caliber memoir will best appeal to audiences with an interest in surfing. [See Prepub Alert, 1/25/15.]-Stacy Shaw, Orange, CA © Copyright 2015. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

William Finnegan has been a staff writer at The New Yorker since 1987 and won two Overseas Press Club awards since 2009. He has written several books including Cold New World, A Complicated War, Dateline Soweto, and Crossing the Line. In 2016, he won the Pulitzer Prize for biography for Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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