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The day the crayons quit / by Drew Daywalt ; pictures by Oliver Jeffers.

By: Daywalt, Drew [author.].
Contributor(s): Jeffers, Oliver [illustrator.] | Daywalt, Drew. Day the crayons came home.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Crayons: Description: 36 unnumbered pages : color illustrations ; 26 cm.Content type: text | still image Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9780399255373; 0399255370; 9780605711662; 0605711666.Subject(s): Crayons -- Juvenile fiction | Letters -- Juvenile fiction | Animals -- Juvenile fiction | Color -- Juvenile fiction | Color drawing -- Juvenile fiction | Strikes and lockouts -- Juvenile fiction | Crayons -- Fiction | Letters -- Fiction | Color -- Fiction | JUVENILE FICTION -- Concepts -- Colors | JUVENILE FICTION -- Humorous Stories | JUVENILE FICTION -- Social Themes -- Emotions & Feelings | Animals | Color | Color drawing | Crayons | Letters | Strikes and lockouts | Gefühl | FreundschaftGenre/Form: Picture books. | Photographs. | Epistolary fiction. | Wit and humor, Juvenile. | Picture books for children. | Epistolary fiction. | Paper case bindings. | Illustrated case bindings. | Book jackets. | Illustrated endpapers. | Fiction. | Juvenile works. | Photographs -- 2013. | Epistolary fiction. | Wit and humor, Juvenile. | Picture books. | Epistolary fiction. | Fiction. | Juvenile works. | Photographs. | Dust jackets (Bindings) | Dust jackets (Bindings) -- 2013. | Juvenile literature.DDC classification: [E] Awards: E.B. White Read Aloud Award, 2014. | Washington Children's Choice Picture Book Award, 2015.Summary: Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: his crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking -- each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
CML Easy Fiction Longview campus
CML Easy Fiction Area
D2730cr (Browse shelf) Available 0000002249753

Sequel: The day the crayons came home (2015).

Poor Duncan just wants to color. But when he opens his box of crayons, he finds only letters, all saying the same thing: his crayons have had enough! They quit! Beige Crayon is tired of playing second fiddle to Brown Crayon. Black wants to be used for more than just outlining. Blue needs a break from coloring all those bodies of water. And Orange and Yellow are no longer speaking -- each believes he is the true color of the sun. What can Duncan possibly do to appease all of the crayons and get them back to doing what they do best?

E.B. White Read Aloud Award, 2014.

Washington Children's Choice Picture Book Award, 2015.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

School Library Journal Review

K-Gr 2-In this delightfully imaginative take on a beloved childhood activity, a young boy's crayons have had enough. Fed up with their workload and eager to voice their grievances, they pen letters to Duncan detailing their frustrations. Energetic and off-the-wall, the complaints are always wildly funny, from the neurotically neat Purple ("If you DON'T START COLORING INSIDE the lines soon. I'm going to COMPLETELY LOSE IT") to the underappreciated White ("If I didn't have a black outline, you wouldn't even know I was THERE!"). Daywalt has an instinctive understanding of the kind of humor that will resonate with young children, such as Orange and Yellow duking it out over which of them represents the true color of the sun or Peach's lament that ever since its wrapper has fallen off, it feels naked. Though Jeffers's messily scrawled crayon illustrations are appropriately childlike, they're also infused with a sophisticated wit that perfectly accompanies the laugh-out-loud text; for example, a letter from Beige, in which he bemoans being tasked with drawing dull items like turkey dinners, is paired with an image of the crestfallen crayon drooping over beside a blade of wheat. Later on, Pink grumbles about constantly being passed over for less-feminine colors while the opposite page depicts a discomfited-looking pink monster and cowboy being derided by a similarly hued dinosaur. This colorful title should make for an uproarious storytime and may even inspire some equally creative art projects.-Mahnaz Dar, Library Journal (c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Drew Daywalt is an American filmmaker and author. His children's books include The Day the Crayons Quit and The Day the Crayons Came Home. <p> 030  

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