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The Republic for Which It Stands : The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896.

By: White, Richard.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Oxford History of the United States Ser: Publisher: Oxford : Oxford University Press, Incorporated, 2017Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (996 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780190619060.Subject(s): Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877)Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: The Republic for Which It Stands : The United States During Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896DDC classification: 973.8 LOC classification: E668.W458 2017Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover -- The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Epigraph -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Maps -- Editor's Introduction -- The Republic for Which It Stands -- Plates -- Introduction -- Part I: Reconstructing the Nation -- Prologue: Mourning Lincoln -- 1. In the Wake of War -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 2. Radical Reconstruction -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 3. The Greater Reconstruction -- I -- II -- 4. Home -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 5. Gilded Liberals -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 6. Triumph of Wage Labor -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 7. Panic -- I -- II -- 8. Beginning a Second Century -- I -- II -- III -- Part II: The Quest for Prosperity -- 9. Years of Violence -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 10. The Party of Prosperity -- I -- II -- III -- 11. People in Motion -- I -- II -- III -- 12. Liberal Orthodoxy and Radical Opinions -- I -- III -- IV -- V -- 13. Dying for Progress -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 14. The Great Upheaval -- I -- II -- III -- 15. Reform -- I -- II -- 16. Westward the Course of Reform -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 17. The Center Fails to Hold -- I -- II -- III -- 18. The Poetry of a Pound of Steel -- I -- II -- III -- Part III: The Crisis Arrives -- 19. The Other Half -- I -- II -- III -- 20. Dystopian and Utopian America -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 21. The Great Depression -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 22. Things Fall Apart -- I -- II -- III -- 23. An Era Ends -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- Conclusion -- Bibliographical Essay -- Index.
Summary: The newest volume in the Oxford History of the United States series, The Republic for Which It Stands argues that the Gilded Age, along with Reconstruction--its conflicts, rapid and disorienting change, hopes and fears--formed the template of American modernity.
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Cover -- The Republic for Which It Stands: The United States during Reconstruction and the Gilded Age, 1865-1896 -- Copyright -- Dedication -- Epigraph -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Maps -- Editor's Introduction -- The Republic for Which It Stands -- Plates -- Introduction -- Part I: Reconstructing the Nation -- Prologue: Mourning Lincoln -- 1. In the Wake of War -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 2. Radical Reconstruction -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 3. The Greater Reconstruction -- I -- II -- 4. Home -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 5. Gilded Liberals -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 6. Triumph of Wage Labor -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 7. Panic -- I -- II -- 8. Beginning a Second Century -- I -- II -- III -- Part II: The Quest for Prosperity -- 9. Years of Violence -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- V -- 10. The Party of Prosperity -- I -- II -- III -- 11. People in Motion -- I -- II -- III -- 12. Liberal Orthodoxy and Radical Opinions -- I -- III -- IV -- V -- 13. Dying for Progress -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 14. The Great Upheaval -- I -- II -- III -- 15. Reform -- I -- II -- 16. Westward the Course of Reform -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 17. The Center Fails to Hold -- I -- II -- III -- 18. The Poetry of a Pound of Steel -- I -- II -- III -- Part III: The Crisis Arrives -- 19. The Other Half -- I -- II -- III -- 20. Dystopian and Utopian America -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 21. The Great Depression -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- 22. Things Fall Apart -- I -- II -- III -- 23. An Era Ends -- I -- II -- III -- IV -- Conclusion -- Bibliographical Essay -- Index.

The newest volume in the Oxford History of the United States series, The Republic for Which It Stands argues that the Gilded Age, along with Reconstruction--its conflicts, rapid and disorienting change, hopes and fears--formed the template of American modernity.

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Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

Preeminent scholar White (Margaret Byrne Professor of American History, Stanford Univ.; The Middle Ground) authors the latest volume in the "History of the United States" series. He begins by examining the idyllic vision of the United States promulgated by the Radical Republicans at the onset of Reconstruction in which the civil rights of all individuals were respected. That dream was supplanted as the populace raced to seize economic opportunity in the West. Vast fortunes were made, often aided by corrupt politicians. As the nation's wealth became concentrated in the hands of the elite, the impoverished saw their opportunities decline and oppression increase. Prosperity proved fleeting for the middle class, as the nation was roiled economically by boom and bust cycles. American Indians fought desperately to cling to their homelands as interlopers abounded, supported by the might of the U.S. military. Immigrants provided essential labor for the expansion westward yet experienced extreme discrimination. In the midst of this chaos, Americans came to forge an optimistic worldview that saw the United States as a unified and diverse country that should share its values beyond its continental borders. VERDICT This seminal work is essential reading on the history of the United States.-John R. Burch, Univ. of -Tennessee at Martin © Copyright 2017. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

The conclusion of the Civil War through the 1890s marked the transformation of the US from a rural and agrarian society of free laborers to a modern, urban, industrial nation where wages and possessions replaced liberty and individualism. White's rich, sweeping history chronicles the divide between the Radical Republicans (today's Libertarians) and those who saw the need for governmental protection of individual rights. Race and economic status divided the public. While land redistribution in the West provided opportunities for white settlers, it put Native Americans in a compromised position; the lack of such distribution in the South left African Americans in a poor, disadvantaged position. Throughout the US, the home, provided by men's labor and cared for by women, remained the sacred center of the developing American Dream. Due to expansion, urbanization, and industrialization brought about by population growth fueled by immigration between 1865 and the end of the century, the religiously homogeneous white US transformed into a nation of Protestants, Catholics, and Jews. White (Stanford) seamlessly incorporates political, economic, social, and legal history to show the birth of the modern US. Throughout, he includes fascinating anecdotes that captivate readers. Summing Up: Highly recommended. All levels/libraries. --Duncan R. Jamieson, Ashland University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Richard White is Margaret Byrne Professor of American History at Stanford University. He is the author of numerous prize-winning books, including Railroaded: The Transcontinentals and the Making of Modern America, The Middle Ground: Indians, Empires, and Republics in the Great Lakes Region, 1650-1815, and "It's Your Misfortune and None of My Own": A New History of the American West. He is a recipient of a MacArthur Fellowship, a Guggenheim Fellowship, and a Mellon Distinguished Scholar Award, among other awards.

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