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Legacies of Losing in American Politics.

By: Tulis, Jeffrey K.
Contributor(s): Mellow, Nicole.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Chicago Studies in American Politics: Publisher: Chicago : University of Chicago Press, 2018Copyright date: ©2017Description: 1 online resource (225 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780226515465.Subject(s): United States-Politics and government | Federal government-United States | Johnson, Andrew,-1808-1875 | Reconstruction (U.S. history, 1865-1877) | Goldwater, Barry M.-(Barry Morris),-1909-1998Genre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Legacies of Losing in American PoliticsDDC classification: 973 LOC classification: JK31Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- 1. Political Failure, and Success -- 2. Founding: The Anti-Federal Appropriation -- 3. Reconstruction: Andrew Johnson's Politics of Obstruction -- 4. New Deal: Barry Goldwater's Politics of Integrity -- 5. Legacies of Loss in American Politics -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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JK31 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4929712 Available EBC4929712

Intro -- Contents -- 1. Political Failure, and Success -- 2. Founding: The Anti-Federal Appropriation -- 3. Reconstruction: Andrew Johnson's Politics of Obstruction -- 4. New Deal: Barry Goldwater's Politics of Integrity -- 5. Legacies of Loss in American Politics -- Acknowledgments -- Notes -- Index.

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CHOICE Review

Tulis (Univ. of Texas at Austin) and Mellow (Williams College), in their fascinating and elegant book, ask us to reconsider the legacies of three of the biggest political losers in American history: the anti-Federalists, who opposed ratification of a new Constitution; Andrew Johnson, elevated to the presidency in 1865 and impeached in 1868; and Barry Goldwater, who lost a landslide election in 1964. Tulis and Mellow argue that these losses did not preclude the eventual success of major parts of each's political program. Legacies of Losing will appeal to two big audiences. For historians, the case studies of the anti-Federalists (chapter 2), Johnson (chapter 3), and Goldwater (chapter 4) will prove delightful. The discussion in chapter 5 will animate political scientists. Longstanding theories of critical change should be rethought. The authors posit that Reconstruction and the New Deal were not moments where the limits of the Constitution were exposed--where the constitutional order needed remaking to meet the moment. The raw material was always there in the original Constitutional design. That Johnson and Goldwater could make profoundly anti-Federal arguments that seemed consistent to many with an original intent--grounded in the Framer's Constitutional logic--is evidence of their success. It is their real legacy of losing. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Michael M. Franz, Bowdoin College

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