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Congo love song : African American culture and the crisis of the colonial state / Ira Dworkin.

By: Dworkin, Ira, 1972- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.John Hope Franklin series in African American history and culture: Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2017]Description: 1 online resource (xviii, 439 pages, 8 unnumbered pages of plates) : illustrations (some color), maps.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 146963273X; 9781469632735; 9781469632728; 1469632721.Subject(s): African Americans -- Relations with Africans | Anti-imperialist movements | Black nationalismAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Congo love song.DDC classification: 305.9 LOC classification: E185.625Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction. James Weldon Johnson's Transnational Vaudeville ; Part I. The Nineteenth-Century Routes of Black Transnationalism ; Chapter 1. George Washington Williams's Stern Duty of History ; Chapter 2. William Henry Sheppard's Country of My Forefathers ; Chapter 3. Booker T. Washington's African at Home ; Part II. The Twentieth-Century Cultures of the American Congo ; Chapter 4. Missionary Cultures: The American Presbyterian Congo Mission, Althea Brown Edmiston, and the Languages of the Congo.
Chapter 5. Literary Cultures: The Black Press, Pauline E. Hopkins, and the Rewriting of Africa ; Chapter 6. Visual Cultures: Hampton Institute, William Sheppard's Kuba Collection, and African American Art ; Part III. The Congo in Modern African American Poetics and Politics ; Chapter 7. Near the Congo: Langston Hughes and the Geopolitics of Internationalist Poetry ; Chapter 8. Another Black Magazine with a Lumumba Poem: Patrice Lumumba and African American Poetry ; Chapter 9. The Chickens Coming Home to Roost: Malcolm X, the Congo, and Modern Black Nationalism ; Conclusion ; Appendix. Malcolm X on the Congo, February 14, 1965, Detroit Notes.
Summary: An examination of "black Americans' long cultural and political engagement with the Congo and its people. Through studies of George Washington Williams, Booker T. Washington, Pauline Hopkins, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, and other figures, [Dworkin] brings to light a long-standing relationship that challenges familiar presumptions about African American commitments to Africa. Dworkin offers compelling new ways to understand how African American involvement in the Congo has helped shape anticolonialism, black aesthetics, and modern black nationalism"-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
E185.625 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469632728_dworkin Available ocn986212780

Includes bibliographical references (pages 299-415) and index.

An examination of "black Americans' long cultural and political engagement with the Congo and its people. Through studies of George Washington Williams, Booker T. Washington, Pauline Hopkins, Langston Hughes, Malcolm X, and other figures, [Dworkin] brings to light a long-standing relationship that challenges familiar presumptions about African American commitments to Africa. Dworkin offers compelling new ways to understand how African American involvement in the Congo has helped shape anticolonialism, black aesthetics, and modern black nationalism"-- Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from PDF title page (JSTOR, viewed August 31, 2017).

Introduction. James Weldon Johnson's Transnational Vaudeville ; Part I. The Nineteenth-Century Routes of Black Transnationalism ; Chapter 1. George Washington Williams's Stern Duty of History ; Chapter 2. William Henry Sheppard's Country of My Forefathers ; Chapter 3. Booker T. Washington's African at Home ; Part II. The Twentieth-Century Cultures of the American Congo ; Chapter 4. Missionary Cultures: The American Presbyterian Congo Mission, Althea Brown Edmiston, and the Languages of the Congo.

Chapter 5. Literary Cultures: The Black Press, Pauline E. Hopkins, and the Rewriting of Africa ; Chapter 6. Visual Cultures: Hampton Institute, William Sheppard's Kuba Collection, and African American Art ; Part III. The Congo in Modern African American Poetics and Politics ; Chapter 7. Near the Congo: Langston Hughes and the Geopolitics of Internationalist Poetry ; Chapter 8. Another Black Magazine with a Lumumba Poem: Patrice Lumumba and African American Poetry ; Chapter 9. The Chickens Coming Home to Roost: Malcolm X, the Congo, and Modern Black Nationalism ; Conclusion ; Appendix. Malcolm X on the Congo, February 14, 1965, Detroit Notes.

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