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From cakewalks to concert halls : an illustrated history of African American popular music from 1895 to 1930 / by Thomas L. Morgan and William Barlow.

By: Morgan, Thomas L. (Thomas Lesher), 1952-.
Contributor(s): Barlow, William, 1943-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Washington, D.C. : Elliott & Clark Pub., ©1992Description: 132 pages : illustrations, portraits ; 29 cm.Content type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 188021606X; 9781880216064; 1880216175; 9781880216170.Subject(s): African Americans -- Music -- History and criticism | Popular music -- United States -- History and criticism | Noirs américains -- Musique -- Histoire et critique | Musique populaire -- États-Unis -- Histoire et critique | African Americans -- Music | Popular music | Afroamerikanische Musik | Volkstümliche Musik | Volksmuziek | Jazz | Geschichte (1895-1930) | United States | African Americans Music History and criticism | Afro-Americans Music History and criticism | Popular music United States History and criticism | Popular music History and criticism United StatesGenre/Form: Illustrated works. | Criticism, interpretation, etc. | Illustrated works.Additional physical formats: Online version:: From cakewalks to concert halls.DDC classification: 781.64/089/96073 LOC classification: ML3479 | .M67 1992Other classification: 24.65 | cci1icc | LQ 92000 A258 | 9,2
Contents:
Introduction "Bobolishion's Coming": 1865-1895 -- Part One: "Darktown is out tonight": 1895-1915 -- Bob Cole and the Johnson Brothers -- Will Marion Cook -- Bert Williams and George Walker -- James Reese Europe -- Shelton Brooks -- Joe Jordan -- Part two: "T'aint nobody's business if I do": 1915-1930 -- Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake -- Cecil Mack -- W.C. Handy -- Clarence WIlliams -- Conclusion: "Mood Indigo": 1930 and beyond.
Summary: "From Cakewalks to Concert Halls: An Illustrated History of African American Popular Music from 1895 to 1930" by Thomas L. Morgan and William Barlow explores the critical role African Americans played in the development of American popular music before the Great Depression. The first pictorial treatment of this fascinating chapter in the history of popular culture, it relates how black music gradually entered the mainstream, eventually on its own terms. "From Cakewalks to Concert Halls" reveals a now forgotten time when racial stereotypes were the common currency of both advertising and entertainment. From the days of blackface minstrelsy to the big-band era, it outlines the various ways African-American songwriters, musicians, and singers struggled to forever alter what cultural historian William Barlow calls "the soundscape of American music." -- From publisher's description.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Musical Score University of Texas At Tyler
New book shelf - 2nd Floor
ML3479 .M67 1992 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002253482

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction "Bobolishion's Coming": 1865-1895 -- Part One: "Darktown is out tonight": 1895-1915 -- Bob Cole and the Johnson Brothers -- Will Marion Cook -- Bert Williams and George Walker -- James Reese Europe -- Shelton Brooks -- Joe Jordan -- Part two: "T'aint nobody's business if I do": 1915-1930 -- Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake -- Cecil Mack -- W.C. Handy -- Clarence WIlliams -- Conclusion: "Mood Indigo": 1930 and beyond.

"From Cakewalks to Concert Halls: An Illustrated History of African American Popular Music from 1895 to 1930" by Thomas L. Morgan and William Barlow explores the critical role African Americans played in the development of American popular music before the Great Depression. The first pictorial treatment of this fascinating chapter in the history of popular culture, it relates how black music gradually entered the mainstream, eventually on its own terms. "From Cakewalks to Concert Halls" reveals a now forgotten time when racial stereotypes were the common currency of both advertising and entertainment. From the days of blackface minstrelsy to the big-band era, it outlines the various ways African-American songwriters, musicians, and singers struggled to forever alter what cultural historian William Barlow calls "the soundscape of American music." -- From publisher's description.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This oversized book (9 x 11 inches) traces the history of black popular music in three different ways. The most interesting thread is pictorial, with approximately 80 illustrations, many of them full-page, full-color reproductions of sheet music frontispieces from the late 1890s to the 1930s. Photographs of musicians and a few sketches are also included. The illustrations, together with their informative captions, serve as an independent commentary on the subject. Morgan, from whose collection the illustrations were chosen, also wrote brief "profiles" of the most famous musicians Bob Cole and the Johnson brothers, Will Marion Cook, Bert Williams and George Walker, James Reese Europe, Shelton Brooks, Joe Jordan, Noble Sissle and Eubie Blake, Cecil Mack, W.C. Handy, and Clarence Williams which duplicate, to some extent, the main narrative thread of cultural historian Barlow. The "1895 to 1930" of the title is somewhat misleading, as the 20-page introduction dealing with the spiritual, folk music, and the origins of ragtime, the blues, and jazz, 1865 to 1895, is the largest single unit of the book. The principal theme of the text is how black musicians struggled to assert their own identities artistically and to gain some measure of economic security in this vast industry controlled largely by whites. Barlow is particularly effective in tracing the histories of black vaudeville, the musicals, songwriters, and entertainers. The story abounds in personalities and anecdotes but is less useful in its discussion of musical style. Separate indexes ("Shows and Songs" and "Artists and Producers") are quite handy. Recommended for general readers and undergraduate libraries. W. K. Kearns; University of Colorado at Boulder

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