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Charles W. Chesnutt : essays and speeches / edited by Joseph R. McElrath, Jr., Robert C. Leitz III, Jesse S. Crisler.

By: Chesnutt, Charles W. (Charles Waddell), 1858-1932.
Contributor(s): McElrath, Joseph R | Leitz, Robert C, 1944- | Crisler, Jesse S.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: Stanford, Calif. : Stanford University Press, 1999Description: xxxvii, 596 p. : ill. ; 26 cm.ISBN: 0804735492 (acid-free, recycled paper); 9780804735490 (acid-free, recycled paper).Uniform titles: Selections. 1999 Subject(s): African Americans -- Civil rights | African Americans -- Social conditions | United States -- Race relations | American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | African Americans -- Intellectual life | African Americans in literatureDDC classification: 814/.4 Other classification: 18.06
Contents:
Etiquette (1881) -- Advantages of a well-conducted literary society (1881) -- Future of the Negro (1882) -- Self-made men (1882) -- Methods of teaching (1882) -- Things to be thankful for (1886) -- Advice to young men (1886) -- Inside view of the Negro question (1889) -- What is a white man? (1889) -- Some uses and abuses of shortland (1889) -- Multitude of counselors (1891) -- Some requisites of a law reporter (1891) -- Resolutions concerning recent southern outrages (1892) -- Competition (1892) -- Why I am a republican *1892) -- Liberty and the franchise (1899) -- Literature in its relation of life (1899) -- On the future of his people (1900) -- Plea for the american Negro (1900) -- Future American: what the race is likely to become in the process of time (1900) -- Future American: a stream of dark blood in the veins of the southern whites (1900) -- Future American: a complete race-amalgamation likely to occur (1900) -- Introduction to temple course reading (1900) -- White and the black (1901) -- Visit to tuskegee (1901) -- Defamer of his race (1901) -- Superstitions and folk-lore of the south (1901) -- Negro's franchise (1901) -- Charles W. Chesnutt's own view of his new story, the narrow of tradition (1901) -- Obliterating the color line (1901) -- Pussy meow: the autobiogrphy of a cat, by S.L. Patteson (1901) -- Free colored people of North Carolina (1902) -- Disfranchisement of the negro (1903) -- Race problem (1904) -- Peonage, or the new slavery (1904) -- For Roosevelt (1904)Literary outlook (1905) -- Race prejudice: its causes and its cures (1905) -- Age of problems (1906) -- rights and duties (1908) -- Courst and the negro (1908) -- Lincoln's courtships (1909) -- Right to jury service (1910) -- Who and why was Samuel Johnson? (1911) -- Abraham Lincoln (1912) -- Status of the negro in the United States (1912) -- Address to the medina coterie (1913) -- Perry centennial (1913) -- race ideals and examples (1913) -- Abraham Lincoln: an appreciation (1913) -- Alexander Dumas (1914) -- Ideal nurse (1914) -- Women's rights (1915) -- Solution for the race problem (1916) -- George Meredith (1916) -- Social discrimination (1916) -- Negro in books (1916) -- Introduction to a reading from an unpublished story (1916) -- Will of John Randolph (1917) -- Address to colored soldiers at grays armory (1917) -- Negro authors (1918) -- Mission of the drama (1920) -- resolutions concerning the recent election (1920) -- Authobiography of Edward, Baron Herbert of Cherbury (1921) -- Remarks of Charles W. Chesnutt before Cleveland chamber of commerce committee on negro migration and its effects (1926) -- Negro in art: how shall he be portrayed? (1926) -- Address before Ohio state (1928) -- Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass (1928) -- Remarks of Charles W. Chesnutt, of Cleveland, in accepting the spingarn medal at Los Angeles (1928) -- Negro in present day fiction (1929) -- Advice for businessmen (1930) -- Negro in Cleveland (1930) -- Post-bellum-pre-harlem (1931) -- Writing oof a novel (undated, after 1899) -- Why do we live? (undated) -- Joseph C. Price, orator and educator: an appreciation (undated after 2 August 1923) -- Term negro (undated, before 2 June 1928).
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Includes bibliographical references and index.

Etiquette (1881) -- Advantages of a well-conducted literary society (1881) -- Future of the Negro (1882) -- Self-made men (1882) -- Methods of teaching (1882) -- Things to be thankful for (1886) -- Advice to young men (1886) -- Inside view of the Negro question (1889) -- What is a white man? (1889) -- Some uses and abuses of shortland (1889) -- Multitude of counselors (1891) -- Some requisites of a law reporter (1891) -- Resolutions concerning recent southern outrages (1892) -- Competition (1892) -- Why I am a republican *1892) -- Liberty and the franchise (1899) -- Literature in its relation of life (1899) -- On the future of his people (1900) -- Plea for the american Negro (1900) -- Future American: what the race is likely to become in the process of time (1900) -- Future American: a stream of dark blood in the veins of the southern whites (1900) -- Future American: a complete race-amalgamation likely to occur (1900) -- Introduction to temple course reading (1900) -- White and the black (1901) -- Visit to tuskegee (1901) -- Defamer of his race (1901) -- Superstitions and folk-lore of the south (1901) -- Negro's franchise (1901) -- Charles W. Chesnutt's own view of his new story, the narrow of tradition (1901) -- Obliterating the color line (1901) -- Pussy meow: the autobiogrphy of a cat, by S.L. Patteson (1901) -- Free colored people of North Carolina (1902) -- Disfranchisement of the negro (1903) -- Race problem (1904) -- Peonage, or the new slavery (1904) -- For Roosevelt (1904)Literary outlook (1905) -- Race prejudice: its causes and its cures (1905) -- Age of problems (1906) -- rights and duties (1908) -- Courst and the negro (1908) -- Lincoln's courtships (1909) -- Right to jury service (1910) -- Who and why was Samuel Johnson? (1911) -- Abraham Lincoln (1912) -- Status of the negro in the United States (1912) -- Address to the medina coterie (1913) -- Perry centennial (1913) -- race ideals and examples (1913) -- Abraham Lincoln: an appreciation (1913) -- Alexander Dumas (1914) -- Ideal nurse (1914) -- Women's rights (1915) -- Solution for the race problem (1916) -- George Meredith (1916) -- Social discrimination (1916) -- Negro in books (1916) -- Introduction to a reading from an unpublished story (1916) -- Will of John Randolph (1917) -- Address to colored soldiers at grays armory (1917) -- Negro authors (1918) -- Mission of the drama (1920) -- resolutions concerning the recent election (1920) -- Authobiography of Edward, Baron Herbert of Cherbury (1921) -- Remarks of Charles W. Chesnutt before Cleveland chamber of commerce committee on negro migration and its effects (1926) -- Negro in art: how shall he be portrayed? (1926) -- Address before Ohio state (1928) -- Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass (1928) -- Remarks of Charles W. Chesnutt, of Cleveland, in accepting the spingarn medal at Los Angeles (1928) -- Negro in present day fiction (1929) -- Advice for businessmen (1930) -- Negro in Cleveland (1930) -- Post-bellum-pre-harlem (1931) -- Writing oof a novel (undated, after 1899) -- Why do we live? (undated) -- Joseph C. Price, orator and educator: an appreciation (undated after 2 August 1923) -- Term negro (undated, before 2 June 1928).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The past few years have seen the publication of several volumes of Chesnutt's fiction, monographs about his fiction, and primary resources such as The Journals of Charles W. Chesnutt, ed. by Richard Brodhead (CH, Jun'94), and "To Be an Author": Letters of Charles W. Chesnutt, 1899-1905 (CH, Jul'97). The present volume is an invaluable addition to the growing body of work concerning this African American literary pioneer. It includes all of the 77 known speeches, essays, and shorter nonfiction pieces that Chesnutt produced between 1881 and his death in 1932. Until now, these pieces were almost completely inaccessible, for they either appeared in obscure periodicals or survived only in manuscript form (38 are published here for the first time). Most--but not all--address racial issues, and overall they enhance the reader's understanding of both Chesnutt and his fictions. A concise introduction situates these works in context, and detailed, meticulously researched footnotes help the reader understand Chesnutt's references. The editors of this volume should be thanked for making these materials more easily available. An essential acquisition for all libraries. C. Johanningsmeier; University of Nebraska at Omaha

Author notes provided by Syndetics

An African American born in Ohio, Charles Waddell Chesnutt grew up in North Carolina. At age 25, he returned to Cleveland to raise his family and practice legal stenography. Resisting the temptation to pass as a white man, he made the issue of race and the inequality of African Americans in the Reconstruction South the primary subject of his fiction, essays, and speeches throughout his life. His first story, "The Goophered Grapevine" (1887), was published in the Atlantic Monthly. His major story collections, The Conjure Woman (1899) and The Wife of his Youth and Other Stories of the Color Line (1899), are local-color stories rich in dialect. Uncle Julius, the former slave storyteller, is realistically presented as he tells his Northern white employer tales that show slaves using wit and intelligence to get the best of their masters. <p> Chesnutt's later novels, The House Behind the Cedars (1900) and The Marrow of Tradition (1901), stories of passing and interracial relationships, speak more boldly and bitterly against the racial injustices of the South. They were not well received and, despite the more conciliatory tone of his last novel, The Colonel's Dream (1905), his popularity waned and he returned to his legal business. <p> In 1928 the NAACP awarded Chesnutt the Spingarn Medal for distinguished service to the Negro race. Readers today are rediscovering the humor and subtle satire of Chesnutt's stories. <p> (Bowker Author Biography)

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