Understanding international relations / Chris Brown.

By: Brown, Chris, 1945- [author.]Material type: TextTextEdition: Fifth editionDescription: xi, 308 pages ; 24 cmContent type: text Media type: unmediated Carrier type: volumeISBN: 9781137611710; 1137611715; 9781137611703; 1137611707Subject(s): International relations | International relations | Politics and GovernmentDDC classification: 327 LOC classification: JZ1305 | .B76 2019
Contents:
Preface to the fifth edition -- List of abbreviations. 1 Defining international relations : Introduction -- Perspectives and theories -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 2 The development of international relations theory in the twentieth century : Introduction -- Liberal internationalism and the origins of the discipline -- The "realist" critique of liberal internationalism -- the postwar synthesis -- IR and the behavioural sciences -- Challenges to the realist synthesis -- Pluralism and complex interdependence -- Further reading. 3 International relations theory today : Introduction -- From classical realism to structural realism -- From structural realism to liberal institutionalism -- Constructivism and the "English School" -- Critical international thought -- Feminist theory, gender studies and postcolonialsm -- Conclusion: the end of IR theory? -- Further reading. 4 Agency, structure and the state : Introduction -- The agent-structure problem and levels of analysis -- The state and international relations -- Foreign and domestic policy: agency within the state -- Conclusion: from foreign policy to power -- Further reading. 5 Power and security : Introduction: statecraft, influence and power -- Dimensions of power -- Power, fear and insecurity -- Conclusion: managing insecurity -- Further reading. 6 The balance of power and war : Introduction -- The balance of power -- The political conception of war -- War in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries -- Conclusion: the end of state-centric IR? -- Further reading. 7 Global governance : Introduction: sovereignty, anarchy and global governance -- Functionalism -- Integration theory, federalism and neofunctionalism -- Global economic institutions: Bretton Woods and after -- International regimes and regime theory -- Global governance and (collective) security -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 8 The global economy : Introduction -- The growth of the world economy -- Problems and perspectives -- Structuralism -- The new global economy -- The end of the Global South? -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 9 Globalization : Introduction -- A new economy? -- Neoliberalism and its critics -- new global problems: "Westfailure" and the environment -- Global civil society? -- Further reading. 10 The international politics of identity : Introduction -- Politics in industrial societies -- Identity politics post-1989 -- Globalization and postindustrial society -- Democracy promotion, Asian values and the "clash of civilizations" -- Pluralism and international society -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 11 The individual and international relations : Introduction -- Human rights -- International criminal law -- The juridification of world politics? -- Humanitarian intervention -- Sovereignty as responsibility and the responsibility to protect -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 12 International (dis)order today : Introduction -- The central system -- The rise of "populism" -- Terrorism and the Islamic State -- Reasons to be cheerful -- Conclusion -- Further reading. Bibliography -- Index.
Summary: From Brexit and Trump, to the continued rise of China and armed conflict in Ukraine, how can we understand the unprecedented and destabilizing events shaping world politics today? The author offers a comprehensive introduction to theories of International Relations, explaining how such theories can help us understand historical and contemporary world politics. The text explores everything from foreign policy and security to global governance and global economy.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
JZ1305 .B76 2019 (Browse shelf) Available 0000002253730

Previous edition: Basingstoke : Palgrave Macmillan, 2009.

Includes bibliographical references (pages 257-295) and index.

Preface to the fifth edition -- List of abbreviations. 1 Defining international relations : Introduction -- Perspectives and theories -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 2 The development of international relations theory in the twentieth century : Introduction -- Liberal internationalism and the origins of the discipline -- The "realist" critique of liberal internationalism -- the postwar synthesis -- IR and the behavioural sciences -- Challenges to the realist synthesis -- Pluralism and complex interdependence -- Further reading. 3 International relations theory today : Introduction -- From classical realism to structural realism -- From structural realism to liberal institutionalism -- Constructivism and the "English School" -- Critical international thought -- Feminist theory, gender studies and postcolonialsm -- Conclusion: the end of IR theory? -- Further reading. 4 Agency, structure and the state : Introduction -- The agent-structure problem and levels of analysis -- The state and international relations -- Foreign and domestic policy: agency within the state -- Conclusion: from foreign policy to power -- Further reading. 5 Power and security : Introduction: statecraft, influence and power -- Dimensions of power -- Power, fear and insecurity -- Conclusion: managing insecurity -- Further reading. 6 The balance of power and war : Introduction -- The balance of power -- The political conception of war -- War in the twentieth and twenty-first centuries -- Conclusion: the end of state-centric IR? -- Further reading. 7 Global governance : Introduction: sovereignty, anarchy and global governance -- Functionalism -- Integration theory, federalism and neofunctionalism -- Global economic institutions: Bretton Woods and after -- International regimes and regime theory -- Global governance and (collective) security -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 8 The global economy : Introduction -- The growth of the world economy -- Problems and perspectives -- Structuralism -- The new global economy -- The end of the Global South? -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 9 Globalization : Introduction -- A new economy? -- Neoliberalism and its critics -- new global problems: "Westfailure" and the environment -- Global civil society? -- Further reading. 10 The international politics of identity : Introduction -- Politics in industrial societies -- Identity politics post-1989 -- Globalization and postindustrial society -- Democracy promotion, Asian values and the "clash of civilizations" -- Pluralism and international society -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 11 The individual and international relations : Introduction -- Human rights -- International criminal law -- The juridification of world politics? -- Humanitarian intervention -- Sovereignty as responsibility and the responsibility to protect -- Conclusion -- Further reading. 12 International (dis)order today : Introduction -- The central system -- The rise of "populism" -- Terrorism and the Islamic State -- Reasons to be cheerful -- Conclusion -- Further reading. Bibliography -- Index.

From Brexit and Trump, to the continued rise of China and armed conflict in Ukraine, how can we understand the unprecedented and destabilizing events shaping world politics today? The author offers a comprehensive introduction to theories of International Relations, explaining how such theories can help us understand historical and contemporary world politics. The text explores everything from foreign policy and security to global governance and global economy.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Brown (Univ. of Southampton and author of the excellent International Relations Theory: New Normative Approaches, 1992) believes students are introduced to international relations (IR) with insufficient theory. This brief conceptual IR text fills that need. Brown emphasizes past and current theoretical debates in the field; realist perspectives on the state, power, and national security; international economic relations; and the emergence of new disciplinary issues, including global ecology, migration, and gender. This odd book is too brief and abstract to be useful to beginning students and insufficiently comprehensive and scholarly for advanced students. It includes an extended bibliography and recommended readings at the end of each chapter, but there are no footnotes. A more useful introduction to traditional IR theory is James Dougherty and Rober Pfaltzgraff's Contending Theories of International Relations (3rd ed., 1990). Brown's study might be useful as a supplementary text in an introductory IR course, but it will have limited use in most academic libraries. Undergraduates. M. Amstutz; Wheaton College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

CHRIS BROWN is Emeritus Professor of International Relations at the London School of Economics and Political Science, UK. He has published extensively on International Relations Theory, international political theory, and was previously Chair of the British International Studies Association and, at LSE, Head of the Department of International Relations.

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