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E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches : Theory and Implementation.

By: Isaias, Pedro.
Contributor(s): Spector, J. Michael | Ifenthaler, Dirk | Sampson, Demetrios G.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2015Copyright date: ©2015Edition: 1st ed.Description: 1 online resource (334 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319058252.Subject(s): Computer-assisted instructionGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches : Theory and ImplementationDDC classification: 371.3344678 LOC classification: L1-991Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter-1 -- E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation -- 1.1 E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation-An Overview -- References -- Part I -- Exploratory Learning Technologies -- Chapter-2 -- Measuring Problem Solving Skills in Portal 2 -- 2.1 Literature Review -- 2.1.1 Problem-Solving Ability -- 2.1.2 Materials -- 2.1.3 Game-Based Stealth Assessment -- 2.2 Method -- 2.2.1 Participants -- 2.2.2 Procedures -- 2.2.3 Assessment in Portal 2 -- 2.2.4 External Outcome Measures -- 2.3 Results -- 2.4 Discussion -- References -- Chapter-3 -- iPads in Inclusive Classrooms: Ecologies of Learning -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 iPads in Education -- 3.3 Arguing for an Ecology of Learning with iPads -- 3.4 iPads and School Development -- 3.5 Tablets in the Classroom-Middletown School -- 3.5.1 Classroom Resources and iPad Usage-Socio-Material Bricolage -- 3.5.2 Bricolage in the Ecology of Learning Resources -- 3.5.3 Whiteboard to iPad: Small Screen to Big Screen Relationships -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-4 -- Supporting the Strengths and Activity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Strength-Based Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.3 Method -- 4.3.1 Settings -- 4.3.2 Data Collection and Analysis -- 4.4 Results -- 4.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-5 -- Learning with the Simpleshow -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Simpleshow -- 5.3 Empirical Investigation -- 5.3.1 Pilot Study -- 5.3.2 School Study -- 5.3.2.1 Study "Parliamentary Election" -- 5.3.2.2 Study "Fall of the Berlin Wall" -- 5.3.3 Teachers' Perspectives -- 5.3.4 Discussion -- 5.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part II -- E-Learning Social Web Design -- Chapter-6.
Live, Laugh and Love to Learn Turning Learning from Traditional to Transformational -- 6.1 Towards Authentic and Creative Learning Environments -- 6.2 Dimensions of twentieth Century Teaching -- 6.3 From Traditional to Transformational Learning -- 6.3.1 At the Heart of the Knowledge Acquisition -- 6.4 The Contextual-Pedagogical Learning Process -- 6.4.1 Assessment -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-7 -- The Configuration Process of a Community of Practice in the Collective Text Editor -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Community of Practice -- 7.3 The Collective Text Editor-CTE -- 7.4 The Choice of the Collective Text Editor -- 7.5 Final Thoughts -- References -- Chapter-8 -- Using an Ontological and Rule-Based Approach for Contextual Semantic Annotations in Online Communities -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Background and Related Work -- 8.2.1 Knowledge Capitalization -- 8.2.2 Related Work -- 8.3 A New Approach -- 8.3.1 Knowledge Capitalization Process -- 8.3.2 Contextual Annotation Model -- 8.3.2.1 Resource -- 8.3.2.2 Annotation -- 8.3.2.3 Context -- 8.3.2.4 Controlled Vocabulary -- 8.3.3 Context Reasoning -- 8.3.3.1 Ontological Reasoning -- 8.3.3.2 Rule-Based Reasoning -- 8.3.4 Context-Aware Architecture for CoPEAnnot -- 8.4 Implementation -- 8.5 Evaluation -- 8.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-9 -- Recognizing and Analyzing Emotional Expressions in Movements -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Review of Systems For the Recognition of Emotions -- 9.3 Identification of Human Body Movements -- 9.4 A Vector Model of the Skeleton -- 9.5 Formalization of Human Movements -- 9.6 Evaluation of Similarity Between the Identified and Etalon Movements -- 9.7 Definition Contours of Human Hands -- 9.8 Use For Teaching Children With Hearing Disabilities -- 9.9 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-10.
Student-Driven Classroom Technologies: Transmedia Navigation and Tranformative Communications -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 10.2.1 A Design-Based Research and Methodology -- 10.2.2 Transformative Communications -- 10.2.3 Learning Technologies in Education -- 10.2.4 Classroom Activities: Transmedia and Learning -- 10.3 Student Attitudes Towards Learning With Technology -- 10.4 Study Participants -- 10.5 Findings -- 10.6 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Part III -- Learner Communities Through E-Learning Im plementations -- Chapter-11 -- ICT Support for Collaborative Learning-A Tale of Two Cities -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 ICT and e-learning, Opportunities for Higher Education -- 11.2.1 Educational Viewpoint -- 11.2.2 Management Viewpoint -- 11.2.3 Barriers and Preferences -- 11.2.4 Opportunities -- 11.2.5 Designing a Flexible Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.3 The Course Domain: Service Design -- 11.4 The Context: Two Cities -- 11.4.1 A Pilot Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.4.2 Providing Structure-A Concept Map -- 11.4.3 Organizing the Course for Different Locations -- 11.5 The Current Version of the Elecronic Learning Environment -- 11.5.1 Global Approach -- 11.5.2 The Actual Design -- 11.5.3 Adaptation to Each Individual Class is Needed -- 11.5.4 Student Opinions on the ELE -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-12 -- The Investigation of Pre-Service Teachers' Concerns About Web 2.0 Technologies in Education -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Web 2.0 Technologies and Pre-Service Teacher Concern -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Participants -- 12.3.2 Data Collection -- 12.3.3 Data Analysis -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Discussion -- 12.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-13 -- Teacher Training Using Interactive Technologies: Performance and Assessment in Second Life and Simschool -- 13.1 Introduction.
13.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 13.3 Simulated Learning Environments -- 13.3.1 Classroom Management in Second Life -- 13.3.2 Constructing Knowledge in Second Life -- 13.3.3 Scenario Enactments -- 13.3.4 Student Intern Responses -- 13.4 Virtual Pedagogical Practice in Simschool -- 13.4.1 Computational Representations of Teaching and Learning -- 13.4.2 Indications from simSchool Research -- 13.5 Similarities and Differences -- 13.5.1 Similarities -- 13.5.2 Differences -- 13.6 Discussion -- 13.6.1 Implementation Issues -- 13.6.2 Assessment Challenges and Opportunities -- 13.6.2.1 Assessment Considerations for Role-Playing Models -- 13.6.2.2 Assessment Considerations for Computational Models -- 13.7 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-14 -- A Study on Improving Information Processing Abilities Based on PBL -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Background Theory -- 14.2.1 Information Processing Abilities -- 14.2.2 Examination of the Literature -- 14.3 Study Method -- 14.3.1 Participants and Period of the Study -- 14.3.2 Assessment Method -- 14.3.3 Design of the Study -- 14.3.4 Apply PBL Process for Information Processing Abilities -- 14.4 Research Results -- 14.4.1 Research on the Actual Condition of Information Processing Ability Before Applying PBL -- 14.4.2 Comparing Information Processing Abilities After Applying PBL. -- 14.5 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV -- Collaborative and Student-Centered E-Learning Design -- Chapter-15 -- Constructivism vs Constructionism: Implications for Minecraft and Classroom Implementation -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Minecraft -- 15.2.1 Constructionism in the Context of Minecraft -- 15.2.2 Piaget's Constructivist Theory of Cognitive Development -- 15.2.3 Papert's Constructionism -- 15.3 Research Methods -- 15.4 Results and Discussion -- 15.4.1 The Next New Thing -- 15.4.2 A Thousand Tiny Cuts -- 15.5 Conclusion.
References -- Chapter-16 -- Student-Centered, e-Learning Design \in a University Classroom -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Review of Literature -- 16.2.1 Contemporary Instructional Challenges -- 16.2.2 Instructional Engagement -- 16.2.3 Rethinking Technology's Role -- 16.2.4 Instructional Innovation -- 16.3 Methods -- 16.3.1 Rationale -- 16.3.2 Course Redesign Training -- 16.3.3 Redesign Components -- 16.4 Results -- 16.4.1 Data -- 16.4.2 Practical Application -- 16.4.3 Limitations -- 16.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-17 -- Some Psychometric and Design Implications of Game-Based Learning Analytics -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Context and Log Files -- 17.3 Tools and Methods -- 17.3.1 Symbolic Regression -- 17.3.2 Counts -- 17.3.3 Rule Discovery with Machine Learning -- 17.3.4 Network Analysis -- 17.3.5 Cluster Analysis -- 17.4 Explanatory Constructs and Reflections -- 17.5 Psychometric Implications from the Analyses -- 17.6 Implications for Design of Virtual Performance Assessments -- 17.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-18 -- Self-Assessment and Reflection in a 1st Semester Course for Software Engineering Students -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Methods -- 18.3 Results -- 18.4 Discussion -- 18.4.1 Analysis of the Results of the Pre Questionnaire -- 18.4.2 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Lecturer's Perspective -- 18.4.3 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Students' Perspective -- 18.4.4 Evaluation of the Questionnaire -- 18.4.5 Future Work -- 18.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-19 -- Don't Waste Student Work: Using Classroom Assignments to Contribute to Online Resources -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Assignment Types -- 19.2.1 Paper Summaries -- 19.2.2 Wikibooks -- 19.2.3 Podcast Transcript Writing -- 19.2.4 Creation of Mnemonics for a Wiki.
19.2.5 Online Flash Cards.
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Acknowledgements -- Contents -- Contributors -- Chapter-1 -- E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation -- 1.1 E-Learning Systems, Environments and Approaches: Theory and Implementation-An Overview -- References -- Part I -- Exploratory Learning Technologies -- Chapter-2 -- Measuring Problem Solving Skills in Portal 2 -- 2.1 Literature Review -- 2.1.1 Problem-Solving Ability -- 2.1.2 Materials -- 2.1.3 Game-Based Stealth Assessment -- 2.2 Method -- 2.2.1 Participants -- 2.2.2 Procedures -- 2.2.3 Assessment in Portal 2 -- 2.2.4 External Outcome Measures -- 2.3 Results -- 2.4 Discussion -- References -- Chapter-3 -- iPads in Inclusive Classrooms: Ecologies of Learning -- 3.1 Introduction -- 3.2 iPads in Education -- 3.3 Arguing for an Ecology of Learning with iPads -- 3.4 iPads and School Development -- 3.5 Tablets in the Classroom-Middletown School -- 3.5.1 Classroom Resources and iPad Usage-Socio-Material Bricolage -- 3.5.2 Bricolage in the Ecology of Learning Resources -- 3.5.3 Whiteboard to iPad: Small Screen to Big Screen Relationships -- 3.6 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-4 -- Supporting the Strengths and Activity of Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Strength-Based Technology-Enhanced Learning Environment -- 4.3 Method -- 4.3.1 Settings -- 4.3.2 Data Collection and Analysis -- 4.4 Results -- 4.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-5 -- Learning with the Simpleshow -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 The Simpleshow -- 5.3 Empirical Investigation -- 5.3.1 Pilot Study -- 5.3.2 School Study -- 5.3.2.1 Study "Parliamentary Election" -- 5.3.2.2 Study "Fall of the Berlin Wall" -- 5.3.3 Teachers' Perspectives -- 5.3.4 Discussion -- 5.4 Conclusion -- References -- Part II -- E-Learning Social Web Design -- Chapter-6.

Live, Laugh and Love to Learn Turning Learning from Traditional to Transformational -- 6.1 Towards Authentic and Creative Learning Environments -- 6.2 Dimensions of twentieth Century Teaching -- 6.3 From Traditional to Transformational Learning -- 6.3.1 At the Heart of the Knowledge Acquisition -- 6.4 The Contextual-Pedagogical Learning Process -- 6.4.1 Assessment -- 6.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-7 -- The Configuration Process of a Community of Practice in the Collective Text Editor -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 Community of Practice -- 7.3 The Collective Text Editor-CTE -- 7.4 The Choice of the Collective Text Editor -- 7.5 Final Thoughts -- References -- Chapter-8 -- Using an Ontological and Rule-Based Approach for Contextual Semantic Annotations in Online Communities -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Background and Related Work -- 8.2.1 Knowledge Capitalization -- 8.2.2 Related Work -- 8.3 A New Approach -- 8.3.1 Knowledge Capitalization Process -- 8.3.2 Contextual Annotation Model -- 8.3.2.1 Resource -- 8.3.2.2 Annotation -- 8.3.2.3 Context -- 8.3.2.4 Controlled Vocabulary -- 8.3.3 Context Reasoning -- 8.3.3.1 Ontological Reasoning -- 8.3.3.2 Rule-Based Reasoning -- 8.3.4 Context-Aware Architecture for CoPEAnnot -- 8.4 Implementation -- 8.5 Evaluation -- 8.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-9 -- Recognizing and Analyzing Emotional Expressions in Movements -- 9.1 Introduction -- 9.2 Review of Systems For the Recognition of Emotions -- 9.3 Identification of Human Body Movements -- 9.4 A Vector Model of the Skeleton -- 9.5 Formalization of Human Movements -- 9.6 Evaluation of Similarity Between the Identified and Etalon Movements -- 9.7 Definition Contours of Human Hands -- 9.8 Use For Teaching Children With Hearing Disabilities -- 9.9 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-10.

Student-Driven Classroom Technologies: Transmedia Navigation and Tranformative Communications -- 10.1 Introduction -- 10.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 10.2.1 A Design-Based Research and Methodology -- 10.2.2 Transformative Communications -- 10.2.3 Learning Technologies in Education -- 10.2.4 Classroom Activities: Transmedia and Learning -- 10.3 Student Attitudes Towards Learning With Technology -- 10.4 Study Participants -- 10.5 Findings -- 10.6 Discussion and Conclusions -- References -- Part III -- Learner Communities Through E-Learning Im plementations -- Chapter-11 -- ICT Support for Collaborative Learning-A Tale of Two Cities -- 11.1 Introduction -- 11.2 ICT and e-learning, Opportunities for Higher Education -- 11.2.1 Educational Viewpoint -- 11.2.2 Management Viewpoint -- 11.2.3 Barriers and Preferences -- 11.2.4 Opportunities -- 11.2.5 Designing a Flexible Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.3 The Course Domain: Service Design -- 11.4 The Context: Two Cities -- 11.4.1 A Pilot Electronic Learning Environment -- 11.4.2 Providing Structure-A Concept Map -- 11.4.3 Organizing the Course for Different Locations -- 11.5 The Current Version of the Elecronic Learning Environment -- 11.5.1 Global Approach -- 11.5.2 The Actual Design -- 11.5.3 Adaptation to Each Individual Class is Needed -- 11.5.4 Student Opinions on the ELE -- 11.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-12 -- The Investigation of Pre-Service Teachers' Concerns About Web 2.0 Technologies in Education -- 12.1 Introduction -- 12.2 Web 2.0 Technologies and Pre-Service Teacher Concern -- 12.3 Methodology -- 12.3.1 Participants -- 12.3.2 Data Collection -- 12.3.3 Data Analysis -- 12.4 Results -- 12.5 Discussion -- 12.6 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-13 -- Teacher Training Using Interactive Technologies: Performance and Assessment in Second Life and Simschool -- 13.1 Introduction.

13.2 Conceptual Rationale -- 13.3 Simulated Learning Environments -- 13.3.1 Classroom Management in Second Life -- 13.3.2 Constructing Knowledge in Second Life -- 13.3.3 Scenario Enactments -- 13.3.4 Student Intern Responses -- 13.4 Virtual Pedagogical Practice in Simschool -- 13.4.1 Computational Representations of Teaching and Learning -- 13.4.2 Indications from simSchool Research -- 13.5 Similarities and Differences -- 13.5.1 Similarities -- 13.5.2 Differences -- 13.6 Discussion -- 13.6.1 Implementation Issues -- 13.6.2 Assessment Challenges and Opportunities -- 13.6.2.1 Assessment Considerations for Role-Playing Models -- 13.6.2.2 Assessment Considerations for Computational Models -- 13.7 Summary and Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-14 -- A Study on Improving Information Processing Abilities Based on PBL -- 14.1 Introduction -- 14.2 Background Theory -- 14.2.1 Information Processing Abilities -- 14.2.2 Examination of the Literature -- 14.3 Study Method -- 14.3.1 Participants and Period of the Study -- 14.3.2 Assessment Method -- 14.3.3 Design of the Study -- 14.3.4 Apply PBL Process for Information Processing Abilities -- 14.4 Research Results -- 14.4.1 Research on the Actual Condition of Information Processing Ability Before Applying PBL -- 14.4.2 Comparing Information Processing Abilities After Applying PBL. -- 14.5 Conclusion -- References -- Part IV -- Collaborative and Student-Centered E-Learning Design -- Chapter-15 -- Constructivism vs Constructionism: Implications for Minecraft and Classroom Implementation -- 15.1 Introduction -- 15.2 Minecraft -- 15.2.1 Constructionism in the Context of Minecraft -- 15.2.2 Piaget's Constructivist Theory of Cognitive Development -- 15.2.3 Papert's Constructionism -- 15.3 Research Methods -- 15.4 Results and Discussion -- 15.4.1 The Next New Thing -- 15.4.2 A Thousand Tiny Cuts -- 15.5 Conclusion.

References -- Chapter-16 -- Student-Centered, e-Learning Design \in a University Classroom -- 16.1 Introduction -- 16.2 Review of Literature -- 16.2.1 Contemporary Instructional Challenges -- 16.2.2 Instructional Engagement -- 16.2.3 Rethinking Technology's Role -- 16.2.4 Instructional Innovation -- 16.3 Methods -- 16.3.1 Rationale -- 16.3.2 Course Redesign Training -- 16.3.3 Redesign Components -- 16.4 Results -- 16.4.1 Data -- 16.4.2 Practical Application -- 16.4.3 Limitations -- 16.5 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-17 -- Some Psychometric and Design Implications of Game-Based Learning Analytics -- 17.1 Introduction -- 17.2 Context and Log Files -- 17.3 Tools and Methods -- 17.3.1 Symbolic Regression -- 17.3.2 Counts -- 17.3.3 Rule Discovery with Machine Learning -- 17.3.4 Network Analysis -- 17.3.5 Cluster Analysis -- 17.4 Explanatory Constructs and Reflections -- 17.5 Psychometric Implications from the Analyses -- 17.6 Implications for Design of Virtual Performance Assessments -- 17.7 Conclusion -- References -- Chapter-18 -- Self-Assessment and Reflection in a 1st Semester Course for Software Engineering Students -- 18.1 Introduction -- 18.2 Methods -- 18.3 Results -- 18.4 Discussion -- 18.4.1 Analysis of the Results of the Pre Questionnaire -- 18.4.2 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Lecturer's Perspective -- 18.4.3 Analysis of the Results of the Post Questionnaire and Comparison From the Students' Perspective -- 18.4.4 Evaluation of the Questionnaire -- 18.4.5 Future Work -- 18.5 Conclusions -- References -- Chapter-19 -- Don't Waste Student Work: Using Classroom Assignments to Contribute to Online Resources -- 19.1 Introduction -- 19.2 Assignment Types -- 19.2.1 Paper Summaries -- 19.2.2 Wikibooks -- 19.2.3 Podcast Transcript Writing -- 19.2.4 Creation of Mnemonics for a Wiki.

19.2.5 Online Flash Cards.

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Author notes provided by Syndetics

Pedro Isaías is an associate professor at Universidade Aberta (Portuguese Open University) in Lisbon, Portugal, responsible for several courses and director of the master degree program in Electronic Commerce and Internet since its start in 2003. He is co-founder and president of IADIS - International Association for Development of the Information Society, a scientific non-profit association. He holds a PhD in Information Management (in the speciality of information and decision systems) from the New University of Lisbon. Author of several books (both as author/co-author and editor/co-editor), journal and conference papers and research reports, all in the information systems area, he has headed several conferences and workshops within the mentioned area. He has also been responsible for the scientific coordination of several EU funded research projects. J. Michael Spector is Chair of Learning Technologies in the College of Information at the University of North Texas. His recent research is in the areas of intelligent support for instructional design, system dynamics based learning environments, assessing learning in complex domains, distance learning and technology integration in education. Dr. Spector served on the International Board of Standards for Training, Performance and Instruction (IBSTPI) as Executive Vice President; he is on the Executive Committee of the IEEE Learning Technology Technical Committee and is Past-President of the Association for Educational and Communications Technology (AECT). He is the editor of the Development Section of Educational Technology Research & Development, and he serves on numerous other editorial boards. He co-edited the third and fourth editions of the Handbook of Research on Educational Communications and Technology, and has more than 100 journal articles, book chapters and books to his credit. Dirk Ifenthaler is the Director, Centre for Research in Digital Learning at Deakin University. His previous roles include Manager of Applied Research and Learning Analytics at Open Universities Australia, Affiliate Research Scholar at the University of Oklahoma, USA, and Interim Department Chair and Professor for Educational Science at the University of Mannheim, Germany. Professor Ifenthaler was a 2012 Fulbright Scholar-in-Residence at the Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education, the University of Oklahoma, USA. Dirk''s background is in cognitive psychology, educational technology, statistics, and teacher education. He developed automated and computer-based methodologies for the assessment, analysis and feedback of graphical and natural language representations. His research outcomes include numerous co-authored books, book series, book chapters, journal articles and international conference papers. Dirk is the Editor-in-Chief of Technology, Knowledge and Learning and a member of the Editorial Board for Educational Technology Research and Development. He is the 2013-2014 President for the AECT (Association for Educational Communications and Technology) Division Design and Development, 2013-2014 Chair for the AERA (American Educational Research Association) Special Interest Group Technology, Instruction, Cognition and Learning and Co-Program Chair for the international conference on Cognition and Exploratory Learning in the Digital Age (CELDA). Dirk received the 2012 Outstanding Journal Article Award by AECT, 2009 Outstanding Reviewer Award for Educational Technology Research and Development and the 2006 Outstanding Dissertation Award by the University of Freiburg, Germany. Demetrios G. Sampson has received a Diploma in Electrical Engineering from the Democritus University of Thrace, Greece in 1989 and a Ph.D. in Electronic Systems Engineering from the University of Essex, UK in 1995. He is a Professor of Digital Systems for Learning and Education at the Department of Digital Systems, University of Piraeus, Greece and a Research Fellow at the Information Technologies Institute (ITI), Centre of Research and Technology Hellas (CERTH). He is the Founder and Director of the Advanced Digital Systems and Services for Education and Learning (ASK) since 1999. His main scientific interests are in the area of Learning Technologies. He is the co-author of more than 310 publications in scientific books, journals and conferences with at least 1370 known citations (h-index: 20). He has received 6 times Best Paper Award in International Conferences on Advanced Learning Technologies. He is a Senior and Golden Core Member of IEEE and he was the elected Chair of the IEEE Computer Society Technical Committee on Learning Technologies (2008-2011). He is Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Educational Technology and Society Journal (impact factor 1.171, 2012). He is also a Member of the Steering Committee of the IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies, Member of the Advisory Board of the Journal of King Saud University - Computer and Information Sciences, Member of the Editorial Board of 20 International/National Journals and a Guest Co-Editor in 26 Special Issues of International Journals. His participation in the organization of scientific conferences involves: General and/or Program Committee Chair in 35 International Conferences, Program Committees Member in 330 International/National Scientific Conferences. He has been a Keynote/Invited Speaker in 48 International/National Conferences. He has been project director, principle investigator and/or consultant in 65 R&D projects with external funding at the range of 14 Million e (1991-2016). He is the recipient of the IEEE Computer Society Distinguished Service Award (July 2012).

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