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Applied Cryptography and Network Security : 11th International Conference, ACNS 2013, Banff, AB, Canada, June 25-28, 2013. Proceedings.

By: Jacobson, Michael.
Contributor(s): Locasto, Michael | Mohassel, Payman | Safavi-Naini, Reihaneh.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Berlin/Heidelberg : Springer Berlin Heidelberg, 2013Copyright date: ©2013Description: 1 online resource (584 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783642389801.Subject(s): Data encryption (Computer science)-Congresses | Computer networks-Security measures-Congresses | Cloud computing-CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Applied Cryptography and Network Security : 11th International Conference, ACNS 2013, Banff, AB, Canada, June 25-28, 2013. ProceedingsDDC classification: 005.8/2 LOC classification: TK5102.94 .A267 2013Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Preface -- ACNS 2013 -- Table of Contents -- Cloud Cryptography -- Transparent, Distributed, and Replicated Dynamic Provable Data Possession -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Related Work -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 DR-DPDP -- 3.1 From DPDP to DR-DPDP -- 3.2 Security of DR-DPDP -- 4 Version Control Using DPDP -- 4.1 Common Utility Functions -- 4.2 VCS Operations -- 4.3 Extensions and Analysis -- 4.4 Security of VCS -- 5 Performance -- 6 Conclusions and Future Work -- References -- Client-Controlled Cryptography-as-a-Service in the Cloud -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Model and Requirements -- 3 Design and Implementation -- 4 Security -- 5 Performance Evaluation -- 6 Related Work -- 7 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 HAC Policy with the Bell-LaPadula Security Model -- 2.2 Proxy Re-Encryption (PRE) Scheme -- 2.3 All-Or-Nothing Transformation -- 3 Our CloudHKA -- 3.1 Overview -- 3.2 The Construction -- 4 Analysis -- 4.1 Performance Analysis -- 4.2 Bell-LaPadula Security Model Observation -- 4.3 Security Analysis -- 5 Discussion -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Computing on Authenticated Data for Adjustable Predicates -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Adjustable -- 2.2 Unforgeability -- 2.3 Context Hiding -- 3 Statically Adjustable Computations -- 3.1 Statically Adjustable Computations for AND -- 3.2 Statically Adjustable Computations for OR and NOT -- 4 Dynamically Adjustable Computations -- References -- Secure Computation -- Towards Efficient Private Distributed Computation on Unbounded Input Streams -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Model and Definitions -- 3 Overview of Our Approach -- 4 The Constructions in Detail -- 4.1 The (n, n)-Reconstruction Protocol -- 4.2 The (n − t, n)-Reconstruction Protocol -- References.
From Oblivious AES to Efficient and Secure Database Join in the Multiparty Setting -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 Share-Computing Protocol for AES Block Cipher -- 3.1 S-Box Evaluation Protocol Based on Oblivious Selection -- 3.2 S-Box Evaluation Protocol Based on Circuit Evaluation -- 3.3 Security Analysis for the Entire Protocol -- 3.4 Further Tweaks of the AES Evaluation Protocol -- 3.5 Efficiency Metrics and Real-Life Performance -- 4 Secure Database Join -- 4.1 Secure Inner Join Based on Unique Key Column -- 4.2 Secure Inner Join Based on Unique Multi-column Key Values -- 4.3 Benchmarking Results -- 4.4 Comparison with Related Work -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Private Database Queries Using Somewhat Homomorphic Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Security Model -- 1.2 Our Protocol -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Homomorphic Encryption -- 2.2 Polynomial Arithmetic and Set-Intersection -- 3 The Three-Party Protocol -- 3.1 Our Basic 3-Party Protocol -- 3.2 Reducing Communication via Modular Reduction -- 3.3 Other Optimizations and Variations -- 3.4 Speedups via Batching -- 4 Implementing the Three-Party Protocol -- 4.1 Homomorphic Encryption Schemes -- 4.2 Experimental Setup -- 4.3 Experimental Results -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Hash Function and Block Cipher -- BLAKE2: Simpler, Smaller, Fast as MD5 -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Description of BLAKE2 -- 2.1 Fewer Rounds -- 2.2 Rotations Optimized for Speed -- 2.3 Minimal Padding and Finalization Flags -- 2.4 Fewer Constants -- 2.5 Little-Endian -- 2.6 Counter in Bytes -- 2.7 Salt Processing -- 2.8 Parameter Block -- 2.9 Keyed Hashing (MAC and PRF) -- 2.10 Tree Hashing -- 2.11 Parallel Hashing: BLAKE2sp and BLAKE2bp -- 3 Performance -- 3.1 Why BLAKE2 Is Fast in Software -- 3.2 64-Bit CPUs -- 3.3 Low-End Platforms -- 3.4 Hardware -- 4 Security -- 4.1 BLAKE Legacy.
4.2 Implications of BLAKE2 Tweaks -- References -- Cryptophia's Short Combiner for Collision-Resistant Hash Functions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Hash Functions and their Properties -- 3 A Novel Definition of Combiners for Hash Functions -- 3.1 Black-Box Combiners for Hash Functions -- 3.2 Extending the Traditional Definition -- 3.3 Secure Combiners in Idealized Models -- 4 A Short Multi-property Combiner for Hash Functions -- 4.1 Security Analysis -- 4.2 Pseudorandomness -- References -- Generic Attacks for the Xor of k Random Permutations -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Scenario 1 on f1, f2 . . ., fk with O(2n) Computations -- 3 Scenario 2 on f, g with O(22n) Computations -- 4 Scenario 2 onf1, f2, . . . , fk with O(2(2k−2)n) Computations -- 5 Analysis of Scenario 3 -- 6 Scenario 4: Best Known Advantage on a Single f, g with m<2n -- 7 Scenario 4: Best Known Advantage on f1 -- 8 A Simple Variant of the Schemes with Only One Permutation -- 9 Other Variants and Open Problems -- 10 Summary of the Results -- 11 Conclusion -- References -- Preimage Attacks on Feistel-SP Functions: Impact of Omitting the Last Network Twist -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Specification of Camellia -- 2.2 Specification of CLEFIA -- 2.3 Feistel and 4-Branch Type-2 GFN with an SP Round Function -- 2.4 Domain Extension and Hashing Modes -- 3 Preimage Attacks on Feistel-SP and GFN-SP Functions -- 3.1 Attacks on 11-round Feistel-SP Compression Function -- 3.2 Attacks on 15-round Type-2 GFN-SP Compression Function -- 4 Application to 13-round Weakened Camellia-128 -- 5 Application to 12-round CLEFIA-128 -- 6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Signature -- Constructing Practical Signcryption KEM from Standard Assumptions without Random Oracles -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The State of the Art -- 1.2 Motivation -- 1.3 Our Contributions -- 2 Preliminaries.
2.1 Bilinear Group -- 2.2 Complexity Assumptions -- 2.3 Collision Resistant Hash Function -- 2.4 Definition of Signcryption KEM -- 2.5 Security Model of SC-KEM -- 3 The Proposed Signcryption KEM -- 4 Comparisons -- 5 Proving The Security -- 5.1 Confidentiality -- 5.2 Unforgeability -- References -- Sequential Aggregate Signatures Made Shorter -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contributions -- 1.2 Related Work -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Asymmetric Bilinear Groups -- 2.2 Complexity Assumptions -- 3 Public-Key Signature -- 3.1 Construction -- 3.2 Security Analysis -- 4 Sequential Aggregate Signature -- 4.1 Definitions -- 4.2 Construction -- 4.3 Security Analysis -- 4.4 Discussions -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Group-Oriented Cryptography -- How to Share a Lattice Trapdoor: Threshold Protocols for Signatures and (H)IBE -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Lattices and Gaussians -- 2.2 The GPV Schemes -- 2.3 Secret Sharing -- 2.4 UC Framework -- 3 Threshold KeyGen, Gaussian Sampling, and Delegation -- 3.1 Trapdoors and Standalone Algorithms -- 3.2 Functionalities for Threshold Sampling -- 3.3 Gaussian Sampling Protocol -- 3.4 Trapdoor Delegation -- 4 Key Generation without Trusted Setup -- References -- Toward Practical Group Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Group Encryption: Syntax and Security Model -- 2.1 Syntax -- 2.2 Security Model -- 3 Building Group Encryption Schemes -- 3.1 A Generic Construction -- 3.2 A Canetti-Halevi-Katz Like Paradigm for Group Encryption -- 4 Efficient Instantiations -- 4.1 Building Blocks -- 4.2 The prove Protocol -- 4.3 A Concrete Realization -- References -- System Attack I -- Experimental Analysis of Attack son Next Generation Air Traffic Communication -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background on ADS-B -- 2.1 1090 ES Data Link -- 3 Attacks on 1090ES ADS-B -- 3.1 Passive Attacks -- 3.2 Active Attacks.
4 Implementation, Demonstration and Results -- 4.1 Safety Precautions and Hardware Setup -- 4.2 Implementation -- 4.3 Results -- 5 Feasibility and Requirements Analysis -- 5.1 Passive Attacks -- 5.2 Active Attacks -- 6 Related Work on ADS-B Security -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Launching Generic Attacks on iOS with Approved Third-Party Applications -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background and Threat Model -- 2.1 iOS Platform Overview -- 2.2 Threat Model -- 3 Generic Attack Vector -- 3.1 Attacks via Dynamically Loaded Frameworks -- 3.2 Attacks via Private C Functions -- 3.3 Other Implemented Attacks and Implications -- 4 Attack Mitigation -- 4.1 Improving Application Vetting Process -- 4.2 Enhancement on iOS Sandbox -- 5 Discussions -- 6 Related Work -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Secure Implementation - Hardware -- Hardware Architectures for MSP430-Based Wireless Sensor Nodes Performing Elliptic Curve Cryptography -- 1 Introduction -- 2 A Short Introduction to ECC -- 3 Architectures -- 4 ECC on openMSP430 -- 4.1 openMSP430 -- 4.2 Integer Arithmetic -- 4.3 Polynomial Arithmetic -- 4.4 Software Results -- 5 Stand-Alone ECC Hardware -- 5.1 Stand-Alone ECC Hardware Results -- 6 Drop-in Concept -- 6.1 Drop-in Architecture -- 6.2 Drop-in Concept Hardware Results -- 6.3 Related Work -- 7 Comparison of Implemented Architectures -- 8 Conclusion -- References -- Beyond Full Disk Encryption: Protection on Security-Enhanced Commodity Processors -- 1 Background and Threat Model -- 2 Related Work -- 3 Approach -- 4 Measurement -- 5 Future Work -- 6 Conclusions -- References -- Secure Implementation - Software -- NEON Implementation of an Attribute-Based Encryption Scheme -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Mathematical Background -- 3 Tower Extension Field Arithmetic -- 3.1 Field Multiplication Over -- 3.2 Extension Field Arithmetic Computational Cost.
3.3 Field Arithmetic Implementation Using NEON.
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TK5102.94 .A267 2013 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3096976 Available EBC3096976

Intro -- Preface -- ACNS 2013 -- Table of Contents -- Cloud Cryptography -- Transparent, Distributed, and Replicated Dynamic Provable Data Possession -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Related Work -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 DR-DPDP -- 3.1 From DPDP to DR-DPDP -- 3.2 Security of DR-DPDP -- 4 Version Control Using DPDP -- 4.1 Common Utility Functions -- 4.2 VCS Operations -- 4.3 Extensions and Analysis -- 4.4 Security of VCS -- 5 Performance -- 6 Conclusions and Future Work -- References -- Client-Controlled Cryptography-as-a-Service in the Cloud -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Model and Requirements -- 3 Design and Implementation -- 4 Security -- 5 Performance Evaluation -- 6 Related Work -- 7 Conclusion and Future Work -- References -- CloudHKA: A Cryptographic Approach for Hierarchical Access Control in Cloud Computing -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 HAC Policy with the Bell-LaPadula Security Model -- 2.2 Proxy Re-Encryption (PRE) Scheme -- 2.3 All-Or-Nothing Transformation -- 3 Our CloudHKA -- 3.1 Overview -- 3.2 The Construction -- 4 Analysis -- 4.1 Performance Analysis -- 4.2 Bell-LaPadula Security Model Observation -- 4.3 Security Analysis -- 5 Discussion -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Computing on Authenticated Data for Adjustable Predicates -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Adjustable -- 2.2 Unforgeability -- 2.3 Context Hiding -- 3 Statically Adjustable Computations -- 3.1 Statically Adjustable Computations for AND -- 3.2 Statically Adjustable Computations for OR and NOT -- 4 Dynamically Adjustable Computations -- References -- Secure Computation -- Towards Efficient Private Distributed Computation on Unbounded Input Streams -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Model and Definitions -- 3 Overview of Our Approach -- 4 The Constructions in Detail -- 4.1 The (n, n)-Reconstruction Protocol -- 4.2 The (n − t, n)-Reconstruction Protocol -- References.

From Oblivious AES to Efficient and Secure Database Join in the Multiparty Setting -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 Share-Computing Protocol for AES Block Cipher -- 3.1 S-Box Evaluation Protocol Based on Oblivious Selection -- 3.2 S-Box Evaluation Protocol Based on Circuit Evaluation -- 3.3 Security Analysis for the Entire Protocol -- 3.4 Further Tweaks of the AES Evaluation Protocol -- 3.5 Efficiency Metrics and Real-Life Performance -- 4 Secure Database Join -- 4.1 Secure Inner Join Based on Unique Key Column -- 4.2 Secure Inner Join Based on Unique Multi-column Key Values -- 4.3 Benchmarking Results -- 4.4 Comparison with Related Work -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Private Database Queries Using Somewhat Homomorphic Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Security Model -- 1.2 Our Protocol -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Homomorphic Encryption -- 2.2 Polynomial Arithmetic and Set-Intersection -- 3 The Three-Party Protocol -- 3.1 Our Basic 3-Party Protocol -- 3.2 Reducing Communication via Modular Reduction -- 3.3 Other Optimizations and Variations -- 3.4 Speedups via Batching -- 4 Implementing the Three-Party Protocol -- 4.1 Homomorphic Encryption Schemes -- 4.2 Experimental Setup -- 4.3 Experimental Results -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Hash Function and Block Cipher -- BLAKE2: Simpler, Smaller, Fast as MD5 -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Description of BLAKE2 -- 2.1 Fewer Rounds -- 2.2 Rotations Optimized for Speed -- 2.3 Minimal Padding and Finalization Flags -- 2.4 Fewer Constants -- 2.5 Little-Endian -- 2.6 Counter in Bytes -- 2.7 Salt Processing -- 2.8 Parameter Block -- 2.9 Keyed Hashing (MAC and PRF) -- 2.10 Tree Hashing -- 2.11 Parallel Hashing: BLAKE2sp and BLAKE2bp -- 3 Performance -- 3.1 Why BLAKE2 Is Fast in Software -- 3.2 64-Bit CPUs -- 3.3 Low-End Platforms -- 3.4 Hardware -- 4 Security -- 4.1 BLAKE Legacy.

4.2 Implications of BLAKE2 Tweaks -- References -- Cryptophia's Short Combiner for Collision-Resistant Hash Functions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Hash Functions and their Properties -- 3 A Novel Definition of Combiners for Hash Functions -- 3.1 Black-Box Combiners for Hash Functions -- 3.2 Extending the Traditional Definition -- 3.3 Secure Combiners in Idealized Models -- 4 A Short Multi-property Combiner for Hash Functions -- 4.1 Security Analysis -- 4.2 Pseudorandomness -- References -- Generic Attacks for the Xor of k Random Permutations -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Scenario 1 on f1, f2 . . ., fk with O(2n) Computations -- 3 Scenario 2 on f, g with O(22n) Computations -- 4 Scenario 2 onf1, f2, . . . , fk with O(2(2k−2)n) Computations -- 5 Analysis of Scenario 3 -- 6 Scenario 4: Best Known Advantage on a Single f, g with m<2n -- 7 Scenario 4: Best Known Advantage on f1 -- 8 A Simple Variant of the Schemes with Only One Permutation -- 9 Other Variants and Open Problems -- 10 Summary of the Results -- 11 Conclusion -- References -- Preimage Attacks on Feistel-SP Functions: Impact of Omitting the Last Network Twist -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Specification of Camellia -- 2.2 Specification of CLEFIA -- 2.3 Feistel and 4-Branch Type-2 GFN with an SP Round Function -- 2.4 Domain Extension and Hashing Modes -- 3 Preimage Attacks on Feistel-SP and GFN-SP Functions -- 3.1 Attacks on 11-round Feistel-SP Compression Function -- 3.2 Attacks on 15-round Type-2 GFN-SP Compression Function -- 4 Application to 13-round Weakened Camellia-128 -- 5 Application to 12-round CLEFIA-128 -- 6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Signature -- Constructing Practical Signcryption KEM from Standard Assumptions without Random Oracles -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 The State of the Art -- 1.2 Motivation -- 1.3 Our Contributions -- 2 Preliminaries.

2.1 Bilinear Group -- 2.2 Complexity Assumptions -- 2.3 Collision Resistant Hash Function -- 2.4 Definition of Signcryption KEM -- 2.5 Security Model of SC-KEM -- 3 The Proposed Signcryption KEM -- 4 Comparisons -- 5 Proving The Security -- 5.1 Confidentiality -- 5.2 Unforgeability -- References -- Sequential Aggregate Signatures Made Shorter -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contributions -- 1.2 Related Work -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Asymmetric Bilinear Groups -- 2.2 Complexity Assumptions -- 3 Public-Key Signature -- 3.1 Construction -- 3.2 Security Analysis -- 4 Sequential Aggregate Signature -- 4.1 Definitions -- 4.2 Construction -- 4.3 Security Analysis -- 4.4 Discussions -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Group-Oriented Cryptography -- How to Share a Lattice Trapdoor: Threshold Protocols for Signatures and (H)IBE -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Lattices and Gaussians -- 2.2 The GPV Schemes -- 2.3 Secret Sharing -- 2.4 UC Framework -- 3 Threshold KeyGen, Gaussian Sampling, and Delegation -- 3.1 Trapdoors and Standalone Algorithms -- 3.2 Functionalities for Threshold Sampling -- 3.3 Gaussian Sampling Protocol -- 3.4 Trapdoor Delegation -- 4 Key Generation without Trusted Setup -- References -- Toward Practical Group Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Group Encryption: Syntax and Security Model -- 2.1 Syntax -- 2.2 Security Model -- 3 Building Group Encryption Schemes -- 3.1 A Generic Construction -- 3.2 A Canetti-Halevi-Katz Like Paradigm for Group Encryption -- 4 Efficient Instantiations -- 4.1 Building Blocks -- 4.2 The prove Protocol -- 4.3 A Concrete Realization -- References -- System Attack I -- Experimental Analysis of Attack son Next Generation Air Traffic Communication -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background on ADS-B -- 2.1 1090 ES Data Link -- 3 Attacks on 1090ES ADS-B -- 3.1 Passive Attacks -- 3.2 Active Attacks.

4 Implementation, Demonstration and Results -- 4.1 Safety Precautions and Hardware Setup -- 4.2 Implementation -- 4.3 Results -- 5 Feasibility and Requirements Analysis -- 5.1 Passive Attacks -- 5.2 Active Attacks -- 6 Related Work on ADS-B Security -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Launching Generic Attacks on iOS with Approved Third-Party Applications -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background and Threat Model -- 2.1 iOS Platform Overview -- 2.2 Threat Model -- 3 Generic Attack Vector -- 3.1 Attacks via Dynamically Loaded Frameworks -- 3.2 Attacks via Private C Functions -- 3.3 Other Implemented Attacks and Implications -- 4 Attack Mitigation -- 4.1 Improving Application Vetting Process -- 4.2 Enhancement on iOS Sandbox -- 5 Discussions -- 6 Related Work -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Secure Implementation - Hardware -- Hardware Architectures for MSP430-Based Wireless Sensor Nodes Performing Elliptic Curve Cryptography -- 1 Introduction -- 2 A Short Introduction to ECC -- 3 Architectures -- 4 ECC on openMSP430 -- 4.1 openMSP430 -- 4.2 Integer Arithmetic -- 4.3 Polynomial Arithmetic -- 4.4 Software Results -- 5 Stand-Alone ECC Hardware -- 5.1 Stand-Alone ECC Hardware Results -- 6 Drop-in Concept -- 6.1 Drop-in Architecture -- 6.2 Drop-in Concept Hardware Results -- 6.3 Related Work -- 7 Comparison of Implemented Architectures -- 8 Conclusion -- References -- Beyond Full Disk Encryption: Protection on Security-Enhanced Commodity Processors -- 1 Background and Threat Model -- 2 Related Work -- 3 Approach -- 4 Measurement -- 5 Future Work -- 6 Conclusions -- References -- Secure Implementation - Software -- NEON Implementation of an Attribute-Based Encryption Scheme -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Mathematical Background -- 3 Tower Extension Field Arithmetic -- 3.1 Field Multiplication Over -- 3.2 Extension Field Arithmetic Computational Cost.

3.3 Field Arithmetic Implementation Using NEON.

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