Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Topics in Cryptology - CT-RSA 2014 : The Cryptographer's Track at the RSA Conference 2014, San Francisco, CA, USA, February 25-28, 2014. Proceedings.

By: Hutchison, David.
Contributor(s): Kanade, Takeo | Kittler, Josef.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Publisher: Cham : Springer International Publishing AG, z.Hd. Alexander Grossmann, 2014Copyright date: ©2014Description: 1 online resource (510 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319048529.Subject(s): Data encryption (Computer science)-Congresses | Computer security-Congresses | Computer networks-Security measures-CongressesGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Topics in Cryptology - CT-RSA 2014 : The Cryptographer's Track at the RSA Conference 2014, San Francisco, CA, USA, February 25-28, 2014. ProceedingsDDC classification: 005.8 LOC classification: QA76.9.A25 .C797 2014Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Preface -- Organization -- Table of Contents -- Non-integral Asymmetric Functions -- Efficient and Secure Algorithms for GLV-Based Scalar Multiplication and Their Implementation on GLV-GLS Curves -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 The GLV and GLS Methods -- 2.2 Side-Channel Attacks and Countermeasures -- 2.3 The Least Significant Bit - Set (LSB-Set) Representation -- 3 The GLV-Based Sign-Aligned Column (GLV-SAC) Representation -- 3.1 GLV-Based Scalar Multiplication Using GLV-SAC -- 3.2 Windowed and Partitioned GLV-SAC: Case of Dimension 2 and -- 4 High-Speed Implementation on GLV-GLS Curves -- 4.1 The Curve -- 4.2 Field Arithmetic -- 4.3 Quadratic Extension Field Arithmetic -- 4.4 Extension Field Arithmetic on ARM: Efficient Interleaving of ARM-Based and NEON-Based Multiprecision Operations -- 4.5 Point Arithmetic -- 5 Performance Analysis and Experimental Results -- References -- An Improved Compression Technique for Signatures Based on Learning with Errors -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Related Work -- 1.2 Our Contribution -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Basic Notation and Gaussians -- 2.2 Learning with Errors -- 2.3 Rejection Sampling -- 3 Our Signature Scheme -- 4 SecurityProofs -- 5 Parameter Selection -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Public-Key Encryption -- A Generic View on Trace-and-Revoke Broadcast Encryption Schemes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 First Result: An EDDH-Based TEHPS Instance -- 4 Second Result: (( -- 4.1 Warmup: (1, 2/3)-sid-Traceability of the EDDH-Based RKEM -- 4.2 General Case: (( -- References -- Broadcast Steganography -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 3 Broadcast Steganography (BS) -- 3.1 The Setting -- 3.2 The Security Models -- 4 Anonymity and Pseudorandomness inBroadcast Encryption -- 4.1 The Security Models of oABE -- 4.2 An oABE-CCA-Secure Construction.
5 Constructions of Public-Key Broadcast Steganography -- 5.1 A BS-CHA-Secure Construction -- 5.2 A BS-CCA-Secure Construction -- 6 Extensions and Future Work -- References -- Practical Dual-Receiver Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Refining the Security Model of DRE -- 3 Practical DRE and DKEM from BDDH Assumption -- 3.1 DRE from BDDH Assumption -- 3.2 DKEM from BDDH Assumption -- 4 Plaintext-aware Encryption via Registration from DRE -- 5 Combined Encryption Scheme -- 6 Completely Non-malleable DRE -- 6.1 Modeling Completely Non-Malleable DRE -- 6.2 CNM-DRE from Groth-Sahai Proof System -- 6.3 CNM-DRE from Lossy Trapdoor Functions -- References -- Hardware Implementations -- Attacking PUF-Based Pattern Matching Key Generators via Helper Data Manipulation -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Physically Unclonable Functions -- 2.1 Challenge-Response Pairs and Their Secrecy -- 2.2 Arbiter PUF -- 2.3 XOR Arbiter PUF -- 3 Post-Processing Logic: Generating Keys from PUF Responses -- 3.1 PUF Imperfections -- 3.2 Post-Processing Logic -- 3.3 Fuzzy Extractor -- 4 Pattern Matching Key Generators -- 4.1 Basic Functionality -- 4.2 Handling Failures -- 5 PMKG Failure Analysis -- 5.1 Failure Probabilities -- 5.2 Graphical Interpretation -- 6 Attacks -- 6.1 Attacker Model -- 6.2 Experimental Validation -- 6.3 Common Framework Snake I and Snake II -- 6.4 Snake I -- 6.5 Snake II -- 7 Countermeasures -- 7.1 PMKG Extensions and Alternatives -- 7.2 Attack Capabilities Overview -- 8 Conclusion and Further Work -- References -- On Increasing the Throughput of Stream Ciphers -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 High Level Description -- 4 New Preserving FSR-Transformations -- 5 A Preserving Cipher-Transformation -- 5.1 Technical Description -- 5.2 Discussion -- 6 Application to Grain-128 -- 7 Conclusion -- References.
On Double Exponentiation for Securing RSA against Fault Analysis -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 The RSA Cryptosystem -- 2.2 Addition Chains and Exponentiation -- 3 RSA and Fault Analysis -- 3.1 Securing RSA against Fault Analysis -- 3.2 Self-secure Exponentiation Algorithms -- 3.3 Securing Exponentiation with Double Addition Chains -- 4 New Heuristics for Double Addition Chains -- 4.1 First Improvements -- 4.2 Improved Method Based on Sliding Window -- 4.3 Combined Improvements -- 5 Sliding-Window Double Exponentiation -- 6 Performances and Comparison -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Side-Channel Attacks -- On the Practical Security of a Leakage Resilient Masking Scheme -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Inner Product Masking Scheme -- 3 AFirst-OrderFlaw -- 3.1 Core Idea of the Attack -- 3.2 Study of -- 3.3 Exhibiting the Flaws in -- 4 Information Theoretic Evaluation of the Flaw -- 5 Attack Simulations -- References -- The Myth of Generic DPA. . . and the Magic of Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contribution -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Differential Power Analysis -- 2.2 Measuring DPA Outcomes -- 2.3 Boolean Vectorial Functions -- 3 Clarifying Generic DPA -- 3.1 Delineating Leakage Assumptions -- 3.2 Defining 'Genericity' -- 3.3 Conditions for a Generic Strategy to Succeed -- 4 Introducing Generic-Emulating DPA -- 4.1 Introduction to Linear Regression-Based DPA -- 4.2 Linear Regression Is Generic-Compatible -- 4.3 Exploiting Non-Device-Specific Intuition -- 4.4 A Stepwise Regression-Based Distinguisher -- 4.5 Theoretic Distinguishing Margins for SLR-Based DPA -- 4.6 Practical Success Rate Evaluation -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Hardware Implementation and Side-Channel Analysis of Lapin -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 The Lapin Protocol -- 2.2 The Masking Countermeasure -- 3 Hardware Implementation -- 3.1 Generic Architecture.
3.2 Performance Evaluation -- 4 Side-Channel Analysis of Lapin -- 4.1 A First DPA-Like Attack against Unprotected Lapin -- 4.2 Collision-Like Attack -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Symmetric Encryption and Cryptanalysis -- Automatic Search for Differential Trails in ARX Ciphers -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Partial Difference Distribution Tables -- 3 Threshold Search -- 4 General Methodology for Automatic Search for Differential Trails in ARX -- 5 Description of TEA, XTEA, SPECK and RAIDEN -- 6 Automatic Search for Differential Trails -- 7 Difficulties, Limitations and Common Problems -- 8 Conclusions and Future Work -- References -- CBEAM: Efficient Authenticated Encryption from Feebly One-Way φ Functions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Rotation-Invariant -- Functions -- 2.1 Invertibility -- 2.2 On Cryptanalysis of -- 2.3 General Implementation Features -- 3 CBEAM and Its -- Permutation -- 3.1 Mixing Function -- 3.2 Hashing and Authenticated Encryption -- 4 Design and Analysis -- 4.1 Selection of -- 4.2 Differential and Linear Cryptanalysis -- 4.3 Algebraic Properties -- 5 Padding and Implementation Notes -- 5.1 Hardware Implementations -- 5.2 Implementing CBEAM in Software without Matrix Transpose -- 5.3 Latest Server/Desktop/Laptop Systems: x86-64 with AVX2 -- 5.4 Sensors and Pervasive Devices: MSP430 -- 6 Conclusions -- References -- Beyond Modes: Building a Secure Record Protocolfrom a Cryptographic Sponge Permutation -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Legacy Record and Transport Protocols -- 3 Two-Party Synchronization -- 4 Rethinking Privacy and Authentication -- 5 Half-Duplex Security Protocols with a Shared State -- 6 Extending the Sponge Construction -- 6.1 Multiplex Padding -- 6.2 Multiplexing the Sponge -- 6.3 Sourcing -- 7 Basic Shared Secret Authentication and Record Protocol Flow -- 8 Implementation Notes -- 9 Conclusions -- References -- Digital Signatures.
Group Signatures with Message-Dependent Opening in the Standard Model -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 Bilinear Maps and Complexity Assumptions -- 2.2 Groth-Sahai Proof Systems -- 2.3 Group Signatures with Message-Dependent Opening -- 3 A Fully Collusion-Resistant Partially Structure- Preserving IBE -- 3.1 Intuition -- 3.2 Construction -- 3.3 Proving Properties about Encrypted Messages -- 4 A Fully Anonymous GS-MDO Scheme with Logarithmic-Size Signatures -- 4.1 Construction -- 4.2 Security -- References -- Practical Distributed Signatures in the Standard Model -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contributions -- 1.2 Extensions -- 1.3 Related Work -- 2 Definitions and Security Requirements -- 2.1 Secret Sharing and Monotone Span Program -- 2.2 Distributed Signature Scheme -- 3 OurBasicScheme -- 3.1 Security Analysis -- 3.2 Comparison -- 4 Extensions -- 4.1 Threshold Signatures with Dynamic Addition of Participants -- 4.2 Distributed Signature Scheme for Multipartite Access -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Decentralized Traceable Attribute-Based Signatures -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 Syntax of Decentralized Traceable Attribute-Based Signatures -- 4 Security of Decentralized Traceble Attribute-Based Signatures -- 4.1 On the Model of [11] for the Single Attribute Authority Setting -- 5 Building Blocks -- 5.1 Tagged Signature Scheme -- 5.2 The Full Boneh-Boyen (FBB) Signature Scheme -- 5.3 Strongly Unforgeable One-Time Signatures -- 5.4 Simulation-Sound Non-interactive Zero-Knowledge Proofs -- 5.5 CCA-Secure Public-Key Encryption Scheme -- 6 A Generic Construction for DTABS -- 7 Constructions in the Standard Model -- 7.1 An Instantiation in Symmetric Groups -- 7.2 An Instantiation in Asymmetric Groups -- 7.3 Other Instantiations -- References -- Protocols.
Rethinking Verifiably Encrypted Signatures: A Gap in Functionality and Potential Solutions.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
QA76.9.A25 .C797 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=3101242 Available EBC3101242

Intro -- Preface -- Organization -- Table of Contents -- Non-integral Asymmetric Functions -- Efficient and Secure Algorithms for GLV-Based Scalar Multiplication and Their Implementation on GLV-GLS Curves -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 The GLV and GLS Methods -- 2.2 Side-Channel Attacks and Countermeasures -- 2.3 The Least Significant Bit - Set (LSB-Set) Representation -- 3 The GLV-Based Sign-Aligned Column (GLV-SAC) Representation -- 3.1 GLV-Based Scalar Multiplication Using GLV-SAC -- 3.2 Windowed and Partitioned GLV-SAC: Case of Dimension 2 and -- 4 High-Speed Implementation on GLV-GLS Curves -- 4.1 The Curve -- 4.2 Field Arithmetic -- 4.3 Quadratic Extension Field Arithmetic -- 4.4 Extension Field Arithmetic on ARM: Efficient Interleaving of ARM-Based and NEON-Based Multiprecision Operations -- 4.5 Point Arithmetic -- 5 Performance Analysis and Experimental Results -- References -- An Improved Compression Technique for Signatures Based on Learning with Errors -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Related Work -- 1.2 Our Contribution -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Basic Notation and Gaussians -- 2.2 Learning with Errors -- 2.3 Rejection Sampling -- 3 Our Signature Scheme -- 4 SecurityProofs -- 5 Parameter Selection -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Public-Key Encryption -- A Generic View on Trace-and-Revoke Broadcast Encryption Schemes -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 First Result: An EDDH-Based TEHPS Instance -- 4 Second Result: (( -- 4.1 Warmup: (1, 2/3)-sid-Traceability of the EDDH-Based RKEM -- 4.2 General Case: (( -- References -- Broadcast Steganography -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 3 Broadcast Steganography (BS) -- 3.1 The Setting -- 3.2 The Security Models -- 4 Anonymity and Pseudorandomness inBroadcast Encryption -- 4.1 The Security Models of oABE -- 4.2 An oABE-CCA-Secure Construction.

5 Constructions of Public-Key Broadcast Steganography -- 5.1 A BS-CHA-Secure Construction -- 5.2 A BS-CCA-Secure Construction -- 6 Extensions and Future Work -- References -- Practical Dual-Receiver Encryption -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Refining the Security Model of DRE -- 3 Practical DRE and DKEM from BDDH Assumption -- 3.1 DRE from BDDH Assumption -- 3.2 DKEM from BDDH Assumption -- 4 Plaintext-aware Encryption via Registration from DRE -- 5 Combined Encryption Scheme -- 6 Completely Non-malleable DRE -- 6.1 Modeling Completely Non-Malleable DRE -- 6.2 CNM-DRE from Groth-Sahai Proof System -- 6.3 CNM-DRE from Lossy Trapdoor Functions -- References -- Hardware Implementations -- Attacking PUF-Based Pattern Matching Key Generators via Helper Data Manipulation -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Physically Unclonable Functions -- 2.1 Challenge-Response Pairs and Their Secrecy -- 2.2 Arbiter PUF -- 2.3 XOR Arbiter PUF -- 3 Post-Processing Logic: Generating Keys from PUF Responses -- 3.1 PUF Imperfections -- 3.2 Post-Processing Logic -- 3.3 Fuzzy Extractor -- 4 Pattern Matching Key Generators -- 4.1 Basic Functionality -- 4.2 Handling Failures -- 5 PMKG Failure Analysis -- 5.1 Failure Probabilities -- 5.2 Graphical Interpretation -- 6 Attacks -- 6.1 Attacker Model -- 6.2 Experimental Validation -- 6.3 Common Framework Snake I and Snake II -- 6.4 Snake I -- 6.5 Snake II -- 7 Countermeasures -- 7.1 PMKG Extensions and Alternatives -- 7.2 Attack Capabilities Overview -- 8 Conclusion and Further Work -- References -- On Increasing the Throughput of Stream Ciphers -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 High Level Description -- 4 New Preserving FSR-Transformations -- 5 A Preserving Cipher-Transformation -- 5.1 Technical Description -- 5.2 Discussion -- 6 Application to Grain-128 -- 7 Conclusion -- References.

On Double Exponentiation for Securing RSA against Fault Analysis -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 The RSA Cryptosystem -- 2.2 Addition Chains and Exponentiation -- 3 RSA and Fault Analysis -- 3.1 Securing RSA against Fault Analysis -- 3.2 Self-secure Exponentiation Algorithms -- 3.3 Securing Exponentiation with Double Addition Chains -- 4 New Heuristics for Double Addition Chains -- 4.1 First Improvements -- 4.2 Improved Method Based on Sliding Window -- 4.3 Combined Improvements -- 5 Sliding-Window Double Exponentiation -- 6 Performances and Comparison -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- Side-Channel Attacks -- On the Practical Security of a Leakage Resilient Masking Scheme -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Inner Product Masking Scheme -- 3 AFirst-OrderFlaw -- 3.1 Core Idea of the Attack -- 3.2 Study of -- 3.3 Exhibiting the Flaws in -- 4 Information Theoretic Evaluation of the Flaw -- 5 Attack Simulations -- References -- The Myth of Generic DPA. . . and the Magic of Learning -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contribution -- 2 Preliminaries -- 2.1 Differential Power Analysis -- 2.2 Measuring DPA Outcomes -- 2.3 Boolean Vectorial Functions -- 3 Clarifying Generic DPA -- 3.1 Delineating Leakage Assumptions -- 3.2 Defining 'Genericity' -- 3.3 Conditions for a Generic Strategy to Succeed -- 4 Introducing Generic-Emulating DPA -- 4.1 Introduction to Linear Regression-Based DPA -- 4.2 Linear Regression Is Generic-Compatible -- 4.3 Exploiting Non-Device-Specific Intuition -- 4.4 A Stepwise Regression-Based Distinguisher -- 4.5 Theoretic Distinguishing Margins for SLR-Based DPA -- 4.6 Practical Success Rate Evaluation -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Hardware Implementation and Side-Channel Analysis of Lapin -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 The Lapin Protocol -- 2.2 The Masking Countermeasure -- 3 Hardware Implementation -- 3.1 Generic Architecture.

3.2 Performance Evaluation -- 4 Side-Channel Analysis of Lapin -- 4.1 A First DPA-Like Attack against Unprotected Lapin -- 4.2 Collision-Like Attack -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Symmetric Encryption and Cryptanalysis -- Automatic Search for Differential Trails in ARX Ciphers -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Partial Difference Distribution Tables -- 3 Threshold Search -- 4 General Methodology for Automatic Search for Differential Trails in ARX -- 5 Description of TEA, XTEA, SPECK and RAIDEN -- 6 Automatic Search for Differential Trails -- 7 Difficulties, Limitations and Common Problems -- 8 Conclusions and Future Work -- References -- CBEAM: Efficient Authenticated Encryption from Feebly One-Way φ Functions -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Rotation-Invariant -- Functions -- 2.1 Invertibility -- 2.2 On Cryptanalysis of -- 2.3 General Implementation Features -- 3 CBEAM and Its -- Permutation -- 3.1 Mixing Function -- 3.2 Hashing and Authenticated Encryption -- 4 Design and Analysis -- 4.1 Selection of -- 4.2 Differential and Linear Cryptanalysis -- 4.3 Algebraic Properties -- 5 Padding and Implementation Notes -- 5.1 Hardware Implementations -- 5.2 Implementing CBEAM in Software without Matrix Transpose -- 5.3 Latest Server/Desktop/Laptop Systems: x86-64 with AVX2 -- 5.4 Sensors and Pervasive Devices: MSP430 -- 6 Conclusions -- References -- Beyond Modes: Building a Secure Record Protocolfrom a Cryptographic Sponge Permutation -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Legacy Record and Transport Protocols -- 3 Two-Party Synchronization -- 4 Rethinking Privacy and Authentication -- 5 Half-Duplex Security Protocols with a Shared State -- 6 Extending the Sponge Construction -- 6.1 Multiplex Padding -- 6.2 Multiplexing the Sponge -- 6.3 Sourcing -- 7 Basic Shared Secret Authentication and Record Protocol Flow -- 8 Implementation Notes -- 9 Conclusions -- References -- Digital Signatures.

Group Signatures with Message-Dependent Opening in the Standard Model -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Background -- 2.1 Bilinear Maps and Complexity Assumptions -- 2.2 Groth-Sahai Proof Systems -- 2.3 Group Signatures with Message-Dependent Opening -- 3 A Fully Collusion-Resistant Partially Structure- Preserving IBE -- 3.1 Intuition -- 3.2 Construction -- 3.3 Proving Properties about Encrypted Messages -- 4 A Fully Anonymous GS-MDO Scheme with Logarithmic-Size Signatures -- 4.1 Construction -- 4.2 Security -- References -- Practical Distributed Signatures in the Standard Model -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Our Contributions -- 1.2 Extensions -- 1.3 Related Work -- 2 Definitions and Security Requirements -- 2.1 Secret Sharing and Monotone Span Program -- 2.2 Distributed Signature Scheme -- 3 OurBasicScheme -- 3.1 Security Analysis -- 3.2 Comparison -- 4 Extensions -- 4.1 Threshold Signatures with Dynamic Addition of Participants -- 4.2 Distributed Signature Scheme for Multipartite Access -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Decentralized Traceable Attribute-Based Signatures -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Preliminaries -- 3 Syntax of Decentralized Traceable Attribute-Based Signatures -- 4 Security of Decentralized Traceble Attribute-Based Signatures -- 4.1 On the Model of [11] for the Single Attribute Authority Setting -- 5 Building Blocks -- 5.1 Tagged Signature Scheme -- 5.2 The Full Boneh-Boyen (FBB) Signature Scheme -- 5.3 Strongly Unforgeable One-Time Signatures -- 5.4 Simulation-Sound Non-interactive Zero-Knowledge Proofs -- 5.5 CCA-Secure Public-Key Encryption Scheme -- 6 A Generic Construction for DTABS -- 7 Constructions in the Standard Model -- 7.1 An Instantiation in Symmetric Groups -- 7.2 An Instantiation in Asymmetric Groups -- 7.3 Other Instantiations -- References -- Protocols.

Rethinking Verifiably Encrypted Signatures: A Gap in Functionality and Potential Solutions.

Description based on publisher supplied metadata and other sources.

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.