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Gendering Orientalism : race, femininity, and representation / Reina Lewis.

By: Lewis, Reina, 1963-.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Gender, racism, ethnicity: Publisher: New York : Routledge, 1996Description: xiv, 267 p. : ill. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 0415124891 (hbk.); 9780415124898 (hbk.); 0415124905 (pbk.); 9780415124904 (pbk.).Subject(s): Orientalism in art -- Europe | Women artists -- Europe -- Psychology | Feminism and the arts -- Europe | Arts, European -- 19th century | Browne, Henriette, 1829-1901 -- Criticism and interpretation | Eliot, George, 1819-1880. Daniel Deronda | Eliot, George, 1819-1880 -- Criticism and interpretation | Orientalism | Visual arts By WomenAdditional physical formats: Online version:: Gendering Orientalism.DDC classification: 700 Other classification: 20.10
Contents:
Introduction : making connections -- Race, femininity, representation -- Professional opportunities for women in art and literature -- Gender, genre and nation : Henriette Browne, the making of a woman Orientalist artist -- 'Only women should go to Turkey' : Henriette Browne and the female Orientalist gaze -- Aliens at home and Britons abroad : George Eliot's Orientalization of Jews in Daniel Deronda -- Afterword : gendering Orientalism.
Review: "To what extent did white European women contribute to the imperial cultures of the second half of the nineteenth century?" "In contrast to most cultural histories of imperialism, which analyse Orientalist images of rather than by women, Gendering Orientalism focuses on how women themselves contributed. Drawing on the little-known work of Henriette Browne, other 'lost' women Orientalist artists and the literary works of George Eliot, the author challenges masculinist assumptions relating to the stability and homogeneity of the Orientalist gaze." "Gendering Orientalism argues that women did not have straight-forward access to an implicitly male position of Western superiority. Their relationship to the shifting terms of race, nation and gender produced positions from which women writers and artists could articulate alternative representations of racial difference. In order to draw out how the meanings attributed to their words and images, as well as to the writers and artists themselves, were specifically gendered, classed and racialized, the author examines women's visual and literary Orientalism through their contemporary reception in the press." "By revealing the extent of women's involvement in the popular field of visual Orientalism and highlighting the presence of Orientalist themes and structures in the work of Browne, Eliot and Charlotte Bronte, Gendering Orientalism argues for a more complex understanding of women's role in imperial culture and discourse. The book should appeal to all students and lecturers in cultural studies, literature, art history, women's studies and visual anthropology."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
NX650.E85 L48 1996 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001500818

Includes bibliographical references (p. [242]-258) and index.

Introduction : making connections -- Race, femininity, representation -- Professional opportunities for women in art and literature -- Gender, genre and nation : Henriette Browne, the making of a woman Orientalist artist -- 'Only women should go to Turkey' : Henriette Browne and the female Orientalist gaze -- Aliens at home and Britons abroad : George Eliot's Orientalization of Jews in Daniel Deronda -- Afterword : gendering Orientalism.

"To what extent did white European women contribute to the imperial cultures of the second half of the nineteenth century?" "In contrast to most cultural histories of imperialism, which analyse Orientalist images of rather than by women, Gendering Orientalism focuses on how women themselves contributed. Drawing on the little-known work of Henriette Browne, other 'lost' women Orientalist artists and the literary works of George Eliot, the author challenges masculinist assumptions relating to the stability and homogeneity of the Orientalist gaze." "Gendering Orientalism argues that women did not have straight-forward access to an implicitly male position of Western superiority. Their relationship to the shifting terms of race, nation and gender produced positions from which women writers and artists could articulate alternative representations of racial difference. In order to draw out how the meanings attributed to their words and images, as well as to the writers and artists themselves, were specifically gendered, classed and racialized, the author examines women's visual and literary Orientalism through their contemporary reception in the press." "By revealing the extent of women's involvement in the popular field of visual Orientalism and highlighting the presence of Orientalist themes and structures in the work of Browne, Eliot and Charlotte Bronte, Gendering Orientalism argues for a more complex understanding of women's role in imperial culture and discourse. The book should appeal to all students and lecturers in cultural studies, literature, art history, women's studies and visual anthropology."--BOOK JACKET.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Lewis examines how gender, Orientalism, and imperialism affected the production of and responses to art in the late 1800s. Using the disciplines of art and literary criticism, the sociology of knowledge, and feminist analysis, Lewis contends that gender, ethnicity, social class, and political forces such as nationalism and "respectability" led to multiple contending perspectives. In two cases studies readers see how painter Henrietta Browne and writer George Eliot approached their works and how various audiences responded. Browne painted harem scenes less sexual and more personalized than her male counterparts, and Eliot's Daniel Deronda (a 19th-century "Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?") created a sympathetic portrayal of an "acceptable" Jew. These artists violated some norms, but not others. The book's strengths include its visual art and examples of multiple influences. It has serious problems, however. Lewis makes unnecessary use of jargon, e.g., "positionalities," "deconstructing," and "discourses." She also needs to better link various disciplines and provide a fuller explanation of women's roles in colonialism. Graduate, faculty. S. D. Borchert Lake Erie College

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