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Private Data and Public Value : Governance, Green Consumption, and Sustainable Supply Chains.

By: Jarman, Holly.
Contributor(s): Luna-Reyes, Luis F.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Public Administration and Information Technology Ser: Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2016Copyright date: ©2016Description: 1 online resource (216 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319278230.Subject(s): Management scienceGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Private Data and Public Value : Governance, Green Consumption, and Sustainable Supply ChainsDDC classification: 352.3802854678 LOC classification: HB71-74Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Authors' Biographies -- Chapter 1: Public Value and Private Organizations -- 1.1 Introduction: The Puzzle -- 1.2 The I-Choose Project -- 1.3 Public Value -- 1.4 Why Disclose Private Product Data? -- 1.4.1 Benefits to Public Agencies -- 1.4.2 Benefits to Private Companies -- 1.5 Barriers to Making Product Data Public -- 1.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 2: Challenges to Developing Interoperable Data Architecture to Support Sustainable Consumption and Sustainable Supply Chains -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Literature Review -- 2.2.1 Sustainable Consumption, Information Barriers, and Open Data -- 2.2.2 Information Technology and Sustainable Supply Chain Management -- 2.3 The Primary Data Producers and Information Flow in Sustainable Coffee Supply Chain -- 2.4 Challenges to Opening Data to Support Interoperable Data Platforms -- 2.4.1 Data Challenges: Collection, Accuracy, and Credibility -- 2.4.2 Technology Capability: Technical Expertise, Hardware, and Communication -- 2.4.3 Challenges to Third-Party Certifier: Data Ownership and Conflict of Disclosure Policy -- 2.4.4 Information Policy: Confidentiality, Commercial Privacy, and Economic Value of Information -- 2.4.5 Financial Costs of Digital Data/Information Disclosure -- 2.5 Conditions for Developing Interoperable Data Platform in Sustainable Supply Chain -- 2.5.1 Ensuring Information Integrity, Trustworthiness, and Security -- 2.5.2 Creation of Semantic Compatibilities Among Standards and Protocols -- 2.5.3 Designing Information Policy That Balances Commercial Interests and Openness -- 2.5.4 Creation of Business Model for Integrated Data Platform -- 2.5.5 Establishing Collaborative Governance Model -- 2.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 3: Collaboration and Trust Building Among Public and Private Actors -- 3.1 Introduction.
3.2 Creating and Maintaining Trust -- 3.2.1 Institutional Trust -- 3.2.2 Calculative Trust -- 3.2.3 Relational Trust -- 3.3 Methods, Data, and Case Selection -- 3.4 Collaborative Traceability Efforts Within Mexican Coffee Supply Chains -- 3.4.1 Tosepan Titataniske (Together We Win) -- 3.4.2 Bats'il Maya -- 3.4.3 The Nescafé Plan -- 3.5 Comparison and Discussion of Three Trust Networks -- 3.6 Trust as a Design Characteristic in Large, Scalable FIPP Systems -- 3.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 4: Labeling, Certification, and Consumer Trust -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Government Interventions, Private Regulation, and Market Governance -- 4.3 The Utility of Labels in Assisting Consumer Choice -- 4.4 The Scope of Certifications and Labels -- 4.4.1 The Operational Scope of Certifications and Label Initiatives -- 4.4.2 The Market Growth and Coverage of Certifications -- 4.5 The Governance of Third-Party Certifiers -- 4.6 The Assessment Processes of Third-Party Certifications and Labels -- 4.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 5: Using Ontologies to Develop and Test a Certification and Inspection Data Infrastructure Building Block -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Creating Virtual Certificates to Correct for Information Asymmetries in Markets -- 5.3 Previous Research -- 5.3.1 FIPP Systems and Trust -- 5.3.2 Ontologies and the Semantic Web -- 5.4 Key Technical Components of CIDIBB: Ontology-Based Data Standards and Evaluation System -- 5.5 Empirical Testing of the Proof of Concept -- 5.6 Discussion: Vignettes Illustrating How a Certification and Inspection Data Infrastructure Building Block (CIDIBB) Might Be Used to Create Virtual Certificates -- 5.6.1 Vignette #1: A Certifying Organization Uses CIDIBB to Create a New Virtual Certificate -- 5.6.2 Vignette #2: A Consumer Advocate Uses CIDIBB to Create a New Product or Service Rating System.
5.6.3 Vignette #3: A Producer Featuring Sustainable Products or Services Creates Databases that Are CIDIBB Compliant -- 5.6.4 Vignette #4: TallMart Creates a Two-Sided Market Platform to Produce and Distribute Sustainable Products and Services -- 5.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 6: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security Challenges for Interoperable Data Platforms in Supply Chains -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Challenges to an Interoperable Data Platform -- 6.3 The Information Chains in Certified Coffee Domain -- 6.4 Securing Legitimate Access -- 6.4.1 Data Ownership -- 6.4.2 Conflicting Disclosure Policies -- 6.4.3 Assessing Data Integrity -- 6.5 Governing Access Rights -- 6.5.1 Repercussions of Information Sharing -- 6.5.2 Challenges to Information Access -- 6.6 Maintaining Data Quality -- 6.6.1 Information Accuracy Challenges -- 6.6.2 Information Provenance Complexities -- 6.6.3 Data Representation and Reuse -- 6.7 Mitigating Security Risks: Management and Policy Implications -- 6.7.1 Integrating an Information Security Policies and Culture -- 6.7.2 Balancing Between Confidentiality, Commercial Privacy, and the Benefit of Openness -- 6.7.3 Business Process Models for Access Control Policies -- 6.7.4 Cooperation for Monitoring and Enforcement -- 6.7.5 Flexible Trust Management -- 6.8 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 7: Long-Term Goals and Shifting Power Structures: A Convention-Based View -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The Relevance of Convention Theories for Supply Chain Integration -- 7.3 Methods -- 7.4 Results -- 7.4.1 Traditional Fair Trade Supply Chain -- 7.4.2 Mixed Supply Chain -- 7.4.3 Specialty or the Relational Supply Chain -- 7.4.4 Medium-Sized Farmer Supply Chain -- 7.5 Discussion and Concluding Remarks -- References.
Chapter 8: Encouraging Private Sector Transparency: Policies to Support Disclosure of Product Data in North America -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Key Governance Dilemmas for Data Disclosure -- 8.3 Governance Experiments That Can Inform Private Sector Transparency -- 8.4 The Strengths and Weaknesses of Certification and Labeling -- 8.5 Collaborating to Create a Data Commons -- 8.6 The Relationship Between Collaborative Standards and Hard Law -- 8.7 Concluding Remarks: Encouraging Private Sector Transparency -- References -- Appendix A  Methodology -- A.1. Introduction -- A.2. Fieldwork -- A.2.1. Methods -- A.2.2. Interview Protocol -- Introduction -- Questions -- End -- A.3. Coffee Market Simulator -- A.3.1. Concept Elicitation with Stakeholders in the I-Choose Supply Chain -- A.3.2. Group Model Building Exercise with Research Team -- A.3.3. Model Formulation and Analysis -- A.4. I-Choose Prototype Design -- A.4.1. Methods -- A.4.2. How 28 Use Case Questions Analyze Data Trustworthiness -- A.4.3. The Process of Examining CIDIBB -- A.5. Survey -- A.5.1. Data Collection -- A.5.2. Variable Development and Measurement -- A.5.3. Dependent Variable s -- A.5.4. Independent Variables -- A.5.5. Survey Instrument -- Background Information -- Instructions -- References -- Index.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HB71-74 (Browse shelf) https://ebookcentral.proquest.com/lib/uttyler/detail.action?docID=4427521 Available EBC4427521

Intro -- Acknowledgments -- Contents -- Authors' Biographies -- Chapter 1: Public Value and Private Organizations -- 1.1 Introduction: The Puzzle -- 1.2 The I-Choose Project -- 1.3 Public Value -- 1.4 Why Disclose Private Product Data? -- 1.4.1 Benefits to Public Agencies -- 1.4.2 Benefits to Private Companies -- 1.5 Barriers to Making Product Data Public -- 1.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 2: Challenges to Developing Interoperable Data Architecture to Support Sustainable Consumption and Sustainable Supply Chains -- 2.1 Introduction -- 2.2 Literature Review -- 2.2.1 Sustainable Consumption, Information Barriers, and Open Data -- 2.2.2 Information Technology and Sustainable Supply Chain Management -- 2.3 The Primary Data Producers and Information Flow in Sustainable Coffee Supply Chain -- 2.4 Challenges to Opening Data to Support Interoperable Data Platforms -- 2.4.1 Data Challenges: Collection, Accuracy, and Credibility -- 2.4.2 Technology Capability: Technical Expertise, Hardware, and Communication -- 2.4.3 Challenges to Third-Party Certifier: Data Ownership and Conflict of Disclosure Policy -- 2.4.4 Information Policy: Confidentiality, Commercial Privacy, and Economic Value of Information -- 2.4.5 Financial Costs of Digital Data/Information Disclosure -- 2.5 Conditions for Developing Interoperable Data Platform in Sustainable Supply Chain -- 2.5.1 Ensuring Information Integrity, Trustworthiness, and Security -- 2.5.2 Creation of Semantic Compatibilities Among Standards and Protocols -- 2.5.3 Designing Information Policy That Balances Commercial Interests and Openness -- 2.5.4 Creation of Business Model for Integrated Data Platform -- 2.5.5 Establishing Collaborative Governance Model -- 2.6 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 3: Collaboration and Trust Building Among Public and Private Actors -- 3.1 Introduction.

3.2 Creating and Maintaining Trust -- 3.2.1 Institutional Trust -- 3.2.2 Calculative Trust -- 3.2.3 Relational Trust -- 3.3 Methods, Data, and Case Selection -- 3.4 Collaborative Traceability Efforts Within Mexican Coffee Supply Chains -- 3.4.1 Tosepan Titataniske (Together We Win) -- 3.4.2 Bats'il Maya -- 3.4.3 The Nescafé Plan -- 3.5 Comparison and Discussion of Three Trust Networks -- 3.6 Trust as a Design Characteristic in Large, Scalable FIPP Systems -- 3.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 4: Labeling, Certification, and Consumer Trust -- 4.1 Introduction -- 4.2 Government Interventions, Private Regulation, and Market Governance -- 4.3 The Utility of Labels in Assisting Consumer Choice -- 4.4 The Scope of Certifications and Labels -- 4.4.1 The Operational Scope of Certifications and Label Initiatives -- 4.4.2 The Market Growth and Coverage of Certifications -- 4.5 The Governance of Third-Party Certifiers -- 4.6 The Assessment Processes of Third-Party Certifications and Labels -- 4.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 5: Using Ontologies to Develop and Test a Certification and Inspection Data Infrastructure Building Block -- 5.1 Introduction -- 5.2 Creating Virtual Certificates to Correct for Information Asymmetries in Markets -- 5.3 Previous Research -- 5.3.1 FIPP Systems and Trust -- 5.3.2 Ontologies and the Semantic Web -- 5.4 Key Technical Components of CIDIBB: Ontology-Based Data Standards and Evaluation System -- 5.5 Empirical Testing of the Proof of Concept -- 5.6 Discussion: Vignettes Illustrating How a Certification and Inspection Data Infrastructure Building Block (CIDIBB) Might Be Used to Create Virtual Certificates -- 5.6.1 Vignette #1: A Certifying Organization Uses CIDIBB to Create a New Virtual Certificate -- 5.6.2 Vignette #2: A Consumer Advocate Uses CIDIBB to Create a New Product or Service Rating System.

5.6.3 Vignette #3: A Producer Featuring Sustainable Products or Services Creates Databases that Are CIDIBB Compliant -- 5.6.4 Vignette #4: TallMart Creates a Two-Sided Market Platform to Produce and Distribute Sustainable Products and Services -- 5.7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 6: Privacy, Confidentiality, and Security Challenges for Interoperable Data Platforms in Supply Chains -- 6.1 Introduction -- 6.2 Challenges to an Interoperable Data Platform -- 6.3 The Information Chains in Certified Coffee Domain -- 6.4 Securing Legitimate Access -- 6.4.1 Data Ownership -- 6.4.2 Conflicting Disclosure Policies -- 6.4.3 Assessing Data Integrity -- 6.5 Governing Access Rights -- 6.5.1 Repercussions of Information Sharing -- 6.5.2 Challenges to Information Access -- 6.6 Maintaining Data Quality -- 6.6.1 Information Accuracy Challenges -- 6.6.2 Information Provenance Complexities -- 6.6.3 Data Representation and Reuse -- 6.7 Mitigating Security Risks: Management and Policy Implications -- 6.7.1 Integrating an Information Security Policies and Culture -- 6.7.2 Balancing Between Confidentiality, Commercial Privacy, and the Benefit of Openness -- 6.7.3 Business Process Models for Access Control Policies -- 6.7.4 Cooperation for Monitoring and Enforcement -- 6.7.5 Flexible Trust Management -- 6.8 Concluding Remarks -- References -- Chapter 7: Long-Term Goals and Shifting Power Structures: A Convention-Based View -- 7.1 Introduction -- 7.2 The Relevance of Convention Theories for Supply Chain Integration -- 7.3 Methods -- 7.4 Results -- 7.4.1 Traditional Fair Trade Supply Chain -- 7.4.2 Mixed Supply Chain -- 7.4.3 Specialty or the Relational Supply Chain -- 7.4.4 Medium-Sized Farmer Supply Chain -- 7.5 Discussion and Concluding Remarks -- References.

Chapter 8: Encouraging Private Sector Transparency: Policies to Support Disclosure of Product Data in North America -- 8.1 Introduction -- 8.2 Key Governance Dilemmas for Data Disclosure -- 8.3 Governance Experiments That Can Inform Private Sector Transparency -- 8.4 The Strengths and Weaknesses of Certification and Labeling -- 8.5 Collaborating to Create a Data Commons -- 8.6 The Relationship Between Collaborative Standards and Hard Law -- 8.7 Concluding Remarks: Encouraging Private Sector Transparency -- References -- Appendix A  Methodology -- A.1. Introduction -- A.2. Fieldwork -- A.2.1. Methods -- A.2.2. Interview Protocol -- Introduction -- Questions -- End -- A.3. Coffee Market Simulator -- A.3.1. Concept Elicitation with Stakeholders in the I-Choose Supply Chain -- A.3.2. Group Model Building Exercise with Research Team -- A.3.3. Model Formulation and Analysis -- A.4. I-Choose Prototype Design -- A.4.1. Methods -- A.4.2. How 28 Use Case Questions Analyze Data Trustworthiness -- A.4.3. The Process of Examining CIDIBB -- A.5. Survey -- A.5.1. Data Collection -- A.5.2. Variable Development and Measurement -- A.5.3. Dependent Variable s -- A.5.4. Independent Variables -- A.5.5. Survey Instrument -- Background Information -- Instructions -- References -- Index.

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