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Maverick : the success story behind the world's most unusual workplace / Ricardo Semler.

By: Semler, Ricardo, 1959-.
Material type: TextTextPublisher: New York, NY : Warner Books, c1993Description: 335 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 0446516961; 9780446516969.Uniform titles: Virando a própria mesa. English Subject(s): Semler, Ricardo, 1959- | Businesspeople -- Brazil -- BiographyDDC classification: 338.092/4 | B LOC classification: HC186.5.S46 | A3 1993Review: "How would you like to work in a company that has no receptionists, secretaries, standard hierarchies, dress codes, or executive perks ... a company that lets you set your work hours and even your salary, and asks you to review your boss...a company whose ways of doing business are totally opposite those of most corporations? How would you like to work in a company that not only breaks all the rules, but succeeds?" "Can't be done, you say?" "In 1980 21-year-old Ricardo Semler took over the reins of the company his father founded and built. Ricardo proceeded to break every rule of doing business, firing an entire echelon of upper-level managers. Once he opened the floodgates to change, Semler never - even when he was tempted to - closed them again." "Semler's management system allows employees to work at home, study and discuss the company's financial statements, make corporate decisions, take over the cafeteria kitchen, start their own business with company assets, and redesign the products Semco builds and how they are built. The result: in ten years of constant experimentation - a time period in which Brazil's economy faltered - Semco has achieved a growth rate of 600 percent." "In chronicling Semco's inner revolution, Semler shows how his radical ideas and strategies, as well as his nuts-and-bolts specifics, can be applied to any company anywhere. For instance, he includes actual forms like the questionnaires that Semco's employees use to grade their managers."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
HC186.5.S46 A3 1993 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001250224

"How would you like to work in a company that has no receptionists, secretaries, standard hierarchies, dress codes, or executive perks ... a company that lets you set your work hours and even your salary, and asks you to review your boss...a company whose ways of doing business are totally opposite those of most corporations? How would you like to work in a company that not only breaks all the rules, but succeeds?" "Can't be done, you say?" "In 1980 21-year-old Ricardo Semler took over the reins of the company his father founded and built. Ricardo proceeded to break every rule of doing business, firing an entire echelon of upper-level managers. Once he opened the floodgates to change, Semler never - even when he was tempted to - closed them again." "Semler's management system allows employees to work at home, study and discuss the company's financial statements, make corporate decisions, take over the cafeteria kitchen, start their own business with company assets, and redesign the products Semco builds and how they are built. The result: in ten years of constant experimentation - a time period in which Brazil's economy faltered - Semco has achieved a growth rate of 600 percent." "In chronicling Semco's inner revolution, Semler shows how his radical ideas and strategies, as well as his nuts-and-bolts specifics, can be applied to any company anywhere. For instance, he includes actual forms like the questionnaires that Semco's employees use to grade their managers."--BOOK JACKET.

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Library Journal Review

First published in Brazil in 1988 as Turning the Tables , this book was the all-time best-selling nonfiction book in Brazil's history. Semler, the 34-year-old CEO, or ``counselor,'' of Semco, a Brazilian manufacturing firm, describes how he turned his successful company into a ``natural business'' in which employees hire and evaluate their bosses, dress however they want, participate in major decisions, and share in 22 percent of the profits. Semler believes that Semco is different from most companies that have participatory management because employees are given the power to make decisions--even ones, with which the CEO wouldn't normally agree. Semler claims, ``This is not a business book. It is a book about work, and how it can be changed for the better.'' Highly recommended.-- Mark McCullough, Heterick Lib . , Ohio Northern Univ . , Ada (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

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