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Sensory Perceptions in Language, Embodiment and Epistemology.

By: Baicchi, Annalisa.
Contributor(s): Digonnet, Rémi | Sandford, Jodi L.
Material type: TextTextSeries: eBooks on Demand.Studies in Applied Philosophy, Epistemology and Rational Ethics Ser: Publisher: Cham : Springer, 2018Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (220 pages).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9783319912776.Subject(s): Sense (Philosophy) | Senses and sensationGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Sensory Perceptions in Language, Embodiment and EpistemologyDDC classification: 121.35 LOC classification: B1-5802Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Intro -- Contents -- Editors and Contributors -- Introduction -- Sec1 -- Language: A True Account of the Senses? -- Sensation, Perception, Ception, Representation -- Sensory Perceptions and Its Representation -- Theoretical Perspective -- 1 Our Biological Mind in the Modern Verbal World -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Our Savanna Legacy -- 3 What Kind of Mind Has Evolution Given Us? -- 4 Our Ecological Minds and Complex Social Decisions -- 4.1 Weapons -- 4.2 Cooking -- 4.3 Domestication of Plants, and Animals -- 4.4 New Sources of Energy -- 4.5 Social Cooperation -- 5 Sensory Systems and Environmental Problem-Solving -- 5.1 Umwelt -- 5.2 Color -- 5.3 Color and Emotions -- 6 The Emergence of Language -- 7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- 2 Embodied Semantics and the Mirror Neurons: Past Research and Some Proposals for the Future -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Concept of "Body" -- 3 The Mirror Neuron System and Neural Simulation -- 4 Embodied Semantics and Mirror Neurons -- 5 Comprehension or Imagery? -- 6 Some Proposals for Further Research -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- 3 What is not Said: Metaphor and the Deflationary Account -- 1 Metaphor: Two Competing Theories -- 2 Some Examples of Metaphor -- 3 The Deflationary Account of Metaphor and the 'Felt Gap' -- 3.1 'Seeing-as' -- 4 Aspects of a Theory of Metaphor -- References -- 4 Do Metaphors Mean or Point? Davidson's Hypothesis Revisited -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Revisiting the Basic Assumptions of the Cognitive Approach -- 3 Revisiting Davidson's Rebutted Hypothesis -- 4 Revisiting the Use of a Metaphor -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Applied Perspective -- 5 A Neuroimaging Investigation into Figurative Language and Aesthetic Perception -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Emotional Engagement -- 1.2 The Present Study -- 1.3 Neural Correlates of Aesthetic Perception -- 2 Method -- 2.1 Participants -- 2.2 Materials.
2.3 Procedure -- 2.4 Data Analysis -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Ratings of Beauty and Familiarity -- 3.2 Brain Imaging Results: Beauty -- 3.3 Brain Imaging Results: Familiarity -- 4 Discussion -- 4.1 Somatosensory Representations -- 4.2 Emotional Engagement -- 5 Conclusions -- References -- 6 Ception and the Discrepancy Between Vision and Language -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Ception: From Perception to Cognition -- 3 General Fictivity and Embodiment -- 3.1 The Embodied Cognition Theory -- 4 Fictive Motion Events in Descriptive Discourse -- 4.1 External Constraints -- 4.2 Internal Constraints -- 5 Concluding Observations -- References -- 7 Methodological Approaches and Semantic Construal of the Seeing Domain in English -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Two Experimental Protocols -- 2.1 Paradigm 1-Implicit Association Test -- 2.2 Paradigm 2-Explicit -- 3 Discussion -- 3.1 Underlying Conceptualization -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- 8 Metaphors for Musical Motion-Beyond Time Is Motion -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Its Applications to Music -- 3 Method -- 4 Results -- 4.1 Metaphorical Expressions at the Linguistic Level -- 4.2 Conceptual Source Domains -- 4.3 Motion-in-Space Mappings -- 5 Discussion: Musical Motion Beyond Time Is Motion -- 5.1 Temporal Space and temporal progression is motion -- 5.2 Pitch Space and melodic progression is motion -- 5.3 Key Space and harmonic progression is motion -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- 9 Defining Taste in English Informant Categorization -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Theoretical Background -- 2.1 Taste in Philosophy -- 2.2 Physiology of Taste -- 2.3 Basic Taste Terms -- 2.4 Category Membership -- 3 Methodology -- 3.1 Step One-Retrieval of Lexical Items -- 3.2 Step Two-Pre-test -- 3.3 Step Three-Free-Sorting Task -- 4 Data Analyses -- 4.1 Frequency -- 4.2 Family Resemblances -- 4.3 Core Items in the Categories.
5 Discussions and Conclusions -- References -- 10 The Linguistic Expression of Smells: From Lack to Abundance? -- 1 Introduction -- 2 A Lack of Terms for Smell -- 2.1 The Lexicon of Smell -- 2.2 The Semantics of Smell -- 2.3 The Syntax of Smell -- 3 Metaphor and Metonymy: Remedies for the Lack of Terms -- 3.1 Metaphor -- 3.2 Metonymy -- 3.3 Metaphtonymy -- 4 Smell and the Figure of the Invader -- 4.1 Pervasive Smells -- 4.2 Occupying Space -- 4.3 Fighting Smells -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- 11 Synaesthesia and Other Figures. What the Senses Tell Us About Figurative Language -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Synaesthesia -- 3 Other Figures -- 3.1 Metonymy -- 3.2 Hypallage -- 3.3 Simile -- 4 Different Figures, Different Modes of Coexistence with Synaesthesia -- 5 The Senses in Synaesthesia and in Non-synaesthetic Figures -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Contributors -- Index.
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Intro -- Contents -- Editors and Contributors -- Introduction -- Sec1 -- Language: A True Account of the Senses? -- Sensation, Perception, Ception, Representation -- Sensory Perceptions and Its Representation -- Theoretical Perspective -- 1 Our Biological Mind in the Modern Verbal World -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Our Savanna Legacy -- 3 What Kind of Mind Has Evolution Given Us? -- 4 Our Ecological Minds and Complex Social Decisions -- 4.1 Weapons -- 4.2 Cooking -- 4.3 Domestication of Plants, and Animals -- 4.4 New Sources of Energy -- 4.5 Social Cooperation -- 5 Sensory Systems and Environmental Problem-Solving -- 5.1 Umwelt -- 5.2 Color -- 5.3 Color and Emotions -- 6 The Emergence of Language -- 7 Concluding Remarks -- References -- 2 Embodied Semantics and the Mirror Neurons: Past Research and Some Proposals for the Future -- 1 Introduction -- 2 The Concept of "Body" -- 3 The Mirror Neuron System and Neural Simulation -- 4 Embodied Semantics and Mirror Neurons -- 5 Comprehension or Imagery? -- 6 Some Proposals for Further Research -- 7 Conclusion -- References -- 3 What is not Said: Metaphor and the Deflationary Account -- 1 Metaphor: Two Competing Theories -- 2 Some Examples of Metaphor -- 3 The Deflationary Account of Metaphor and the 'Felt Gap' -- 3.1 'Seeing-as' -- 4 Aspects of a Theory of Metaphor -- References -- 4 Do Metaphors Mean or Point? Davidson's Hypothesis Revisited -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Revisiting the Basic Assumptions of the Cognitive Approach -- 3 Revisiting Davidson's Rebutted Hypothesis -- 4 Revisiting the Use of a Metaphor -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- Applied Perspective -- 5 A Neuroimaging Investigation into Figurative Language and Aesthetic Perception -- 1 Introduction -- 1.1 Emotional Engagement -- 1.2 The Present Study -- 1.3 Neural Correlates of Aesthetic Perception -- 2 Method -- 2.1 Participants -- 2.2 Materials.

2.3 Procedure -- 2.4 Data Analysis -- 3 Results -- 3.1 Ratings of Beauty and Familiarity -- 3.2 Brain Imaging Results: Beauty -- 3.3 Brain Imaging Results: Familiarity -- 4 Discussion -- 4.1 Somatosensory Representations -- 4.2 Emotional Engagement -- 5 Conclusions -- References -- 6 Ception and the Discrepancy Between Vision and Language -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Ception: From Perception to Cognition -- 3 General Fictivity and Embodiment -- 3.1 The Embodied Cognition Theory -- 4 Fictive Motion Events in Descriptive Discourse -- 4.1 External Constraints -- 4.2 Internal Constraints -- 5 Concluding Observations -- References -- 7 Methodological Approaches and Semantic Construal of the Seeing Domain in English -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Two Experimental Protocols -- 2.1 Paradigm 1-Implicit Association Test -- 2.2 Paradigm 2-Explicit -- 3 Discussion -- 3.1 Underlying Conceptualization -- 4 Conclusions -- References -- 8 Metaphors for Musical Motion-Beyond Time Is Motion -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Conceptual Metaphor Theory and Its Applications to Music -- 3 Method -- 4 Results -- 4.1 Metaphorical Expressions at the Linguistic Level -- 4.2 Conceptual Source Domains -- 4.3 Motion-in-Space Mappings -- 5 Discussion: Musical Motion Beyond Time Is Motion -- 5.1 Temporal Space and temporal progression is motion -- 5.2 Pitch Space and melodic progression is motion -- 5.3 Key Space and harmonic progression is motion -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- 9 Defining Taste in English Informant Categorization -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Theoretical Background -- 2.1 Taste in Philosophy -- 2.2 Physiology of Taste -- 2.3 Basic Taste Terms -- 2.4 Category Membership -- 3 Methodology -- 3.1 Step One-Retrieval of Lexical Items -- 3.2 Step Two-Pre-test -- 3.3 Step Three-Free-Sorting Task -- 4 Data Analyses -- 4.1 Frequency -- 4.2 Family Resemblances -- 4.3 Core Items in the Categories.

5 Discussions and Conclusions -- References -- 10 The Linguistic Expression of Smells: From Lack to Abundance? -- 1 Introduction -- 2 A Lack of Terms for Smell -- 2.1 The Lexicon of Smell -- 2.2 The Semantics of Smell -- 2.3 The Syntax of Smell -- 3 Metaphor and Metonymy: Remedies for the Lack of Terms -- 3.1 Metaphor -- 3.2 Metonymy -- 3.3 Metaphtonymy -- 4 Smell and the Figure of the Invader -- 4.1 Pervasive Smells -- 4.2 Occupying Space -- 4.3 Fighting Smells -- 5 Conclusion -- References -- 11 Synaesthesia and Other Figures. What the Senses Tell Us About Figurative Language -- 1 Introduction -- 2 Synaesthesia -- 3 Other Figures -- 3.1 Metonymy -- 3.2 Hypallage -- 3.3 Simile -- 4 Different Figures, Different Modes of Coexistence with Synaesthesia -- 5 The Senses in Synaesthesia and in Non-synaesthetic Figures -- 6 Conclusion -- References -- Contributors -- Index.

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