Losing power : African Americans and racial polarization in Tennessee politics / Sekou M. Franklin and Ray Block Jr.

By: Franklin, Sekou M [author.]Contributor(s): Block, Ray, Jr [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Athens : The University of Georgia Press, 2020Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780820356068; 0820356069Subject(s): African Americans -- Tennessee -- Politics and government | Race relations -- Political aspects | Voting -- TennesseeAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Losing power.DDC classification: 305.8009768 LOC classification: E185.93.T3 | F73 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
THE DEEP ROOTS OF POLARIZATION IN TENNESSEE -- Race and Polarization -- Black Politics in Tennessee from the -- Antebellum Period to the Twenty-First Century -- REALIGNMENT OF PARTISAN POLITICS IN TENNESSEE -- Race, Electoral Realignment, and Polarization -- The Legislative Behavior of -- Tennessee's Black Lawmakers -- RACE AND POLARIZATION IN RECENT TENNESSEE POLITICS: THE ISSUES -- The Racial Politics of Tax and Spending Policies -- The Rise and Fall of TennCare -- Immigration and the New Tennesseans -- Controversies and Conflicts over Sentencing -- Policies and the Death Penalty.
Summary: "Losing Power investigates the complex relationship between racial polarization, black political influence, and multiracial coalitions in Tennessee in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Sekou M. Franklin and Ray Block examine the divide in values, preferences, and voting behaviors between blacks and whites, contending that this racial divide is both one of the causes and one of the consequences of black Tennesseans' recent loss of political power. Tennessee has historically been considered more politically moderate and less racially conservative than the states of the Deep South. Yet in recent years and particularly since the mid- 2000s, Republicans have cemented their influence in the state. While Franklin and Block's analysis and methodology focus on state elections, political institutions, and public policy, Franklin and Block have also developed a conceptual framework for racial politics that goes beyond voting patterns to include elite-level discourse (issue framing), intrastate geographical divisions, social movements, and pressure from interest groups"-- Provided by publisher.
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E185.93.T3 F73 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvfxv9d4 Available on1133059809

Includes bibliographical references and index.

THE DEEP ROOTS OF POLARIZATION IN TENNESSEE -- Race and Polarization -- Black Politics in Tennessee from the -- Antebellum Period to the Twenty-First Century -- REALIGNMENT OF PARTISAN POLITICS IN TENNESSEE -- Race, Electoral Realignment, and Polarization -- The Legislative Behavior of -- Tennessee's Black Lawmakers -- RACE AND POLARIZATION IN RECENT TENNESSEE POLITICS: THE ISSUES -- The Racial Politics of Tax and Spending Policies -- The Rise and Fall of TennCare -- Immigration and the New Tennesseans -- Controversies and Conflicts over Sentencing -- Policies and the Death Penalty.

"Losing Power investigates the complex relationship between racial polarization, black political influence, and multiracial coalitions in Tennessee in the first decade of the twenty-first century. Sekou M. Franklin and Ray Block examine the divide in values, preferences, and voting behaviors between blacks and whites, contending that this racial divide is both one of the causes and one of the consequences of black Tennesseans' recent loss of political power. Tennessee has historically been considered more politically moderate and less racially conservative than the states of the Deep South. Yet in recent years and particularly since the mid- 2000s, Republicans have cemented their influence in the state. While Franklin and Block's analysis and methodology focus on state elections, political institutions, and public policy, Franklin and Block have also developed a conceptual framework for racial politics that goes beyond voting patterns to include elite-level discourse (issue framing), intrastate geographical divisions, social movements, and pressure from interest groups"-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Sekou M. Franklin (Author)
SEKOU M. FRANKLIN is an associate professor of political science at Middle Tennessee State University and the author of After the Rebellion: Black Youth, Social Movement Activism, and the Post-Civil Rights Generation.

Ray Block Jr. (Author)
RAY BLOCK JR. is an associate professor of political science and African American and Africana studies at Penn State University.

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