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Unbought and unbossed : transgressive black women, sexuality, and representation / Trimiko Melancon.

By: Melancon, Trimiko [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Philadelphia, Pennsylvania : Temple University Press, 2014Description: 1 online resource (xv, 235 pages .).Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 1439911479; 9781439911471.Subject(s): American literature -- African American authors -- History and criticism | American literature -- Women authors -- History and criticism | Women, Black -- Race identity | Women, Black, in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Unbought and unbossed.DDC classification: 810.9/928708996073 LOC classification: PS153.N5 | M39 2014Other classification: LIT004040 | LIT004290 Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Acknowledgments; Introduction: Disrupting Dissemblance; 1. "New World Black and New World Woman": Or, Beyond the Classical Black Female Script; 2. Toward an Aesthetic of Transgression: Ann Allen Shockley's Loving Her and the Politics of Same-Gender Loving; 3. Negotiating Cultural Politics; 4. "That Way Lies Madness": Sexuality, Violent Excess, and Perverse Desire; 5. "Between a Rock and a Hard Place": Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place; Conclusion: "Without Fear of Reprisals": Representation in the Age of Michelle Obama; Notes; Bibliography; Index.
Summary: "Unbought and Unbossed critically examines the ways black women writers in the 1970s and early 1980s deploy black female characters that transgress racial, gender, and especially sexual boundaries. Trimiko Melancon analyzes literary and cultural texts, including Toni Morrison's Sula and Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place, in the socio-cultural and historical moments of their production. She shows how representations of black women in the American literary and cultural imagination diverge from stereotypes and constructions of "whiteness," as well as constructions of female identity imposed by black nationalism. Drawing from black feminist and critical race theories, historical discourses on gender and sexuality, and literary criticism, Melancon explores the variety and complexity of black female identity. She illuminates how authors including Ann Allen Shockley, Alice Walker, and Gayl Jones engage issues of desire, intimacy, and independence to shed light on a more complex black identity, one ungoverned by rigid politics over-determined by race, gender and sexuality."-- Provided by publisher.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
PS153.N5 M39 2014 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvrf88sr Available ocn894744364

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Unbought and Unbossed critically examines the ways black women writers in the 1970s and early 1980s deploy black female characters that transgress racial, gender, and especially sexual boundaries. Trimiko Melancon analyzes literary and cultural texts, including Toni Morrison's Sula and Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place, in the socio-cultural and historical moments of their production. She shows how representations of black women in the American literary and cultural imagination diverge from stereotypes and constructions of "whiteness," as well as constructions of female identity imposed by black nationalism. Drawing from black feminist and critical race theories, historical discourses on gender and sexuality, and literary criticism, Melancon explores the variety and complexity of black female identity. She illuminates how authors including Ann Allen Shockley, Alice Walker, and Gayl Jones engage issues of desire, intimacy, and independence to shed light on a more complex black identity, one ungoverned by rigid politics over-determined by race, gender and sexuality."-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Acknowledgments; Introduction: Disrupting Dissemblance; 1. "New World Black and New World Woman": Or, Beyond the Classical Black Female Script; 2. Toward an Aesthetic of Transgression: Ann Allen Shockley's Loving Her and the Politics of Same-Gender Loving; 3. Negotiating Cultural Politics; 4. "That Way Lies Madness": Sexuality, Violent Excess, and Perverse Desire; 5. "Between a Rock and a Hard Place": Gloria Naylor's The Women of Brewster Place; Conclusion: "Without Fear of Reprisals": Representation in the Age of Michelle Obama; Notes; Bibliography; Index.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Enhancing understanding of the black women's literary renaissance, Melancon (Loyola Univ. New Orleans) argues that black women's fictions about sexuality stress transgression. Focusing on the post-civil rights era, namely the 1970s and 1980s, the author explores how novels by Toni Morrison, Ann Shockley, Alice Walker, Gayl Jones, and Gloria Naylor portray black female characters who contest inter- and intraracial rules regarding sexual expression. Her interpretations engage the classical black female script, same-gender loving, individuality/community, madness, and the black sexual continuum. As she crafts fresh close readings, Melancon deftly blends in various historical contexts and diverse theoretical references. Through analyses of writers' representational strategies, she reveals that between the Black Arts Movement and the establishment of African American literature as an academic pursuit, female novelists produced works that probed how rapidly transforming political realities spurred appetites for a postmodern black sexuality, a sensibility that allows individual choice to repudiate crippling societal constraints. Melancon's claims about this postmodern sexuality need to congeal more fully, and her study's final two sections lack the comprehensiveness of her previous treatments. Despite this unevenness, Unbought and Unbossed makes a generous contribution to literary history and cultural criticism, prodding the reader toward new, challenging discussions about black women's sexuality. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Michael D. Hill, University of Iowa

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Trimiko Melancon is Assistant Professor of English, African American Studies, and Women's Studies at Loyola University New Orleans.

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