To belong in Buenos Aires : Germans, Argentines, and the rise of a pluralist society / Benjamin Bryce.

By: Bryce, Benjamin [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Stanford, California : Stanford University Press, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (xxi, 223 pages) : illustrations, mapsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781503604353; 1503604357Subject(s): Germans -- Argentina -- Buenos Aires -- Ethnic identity -- History | Ethnicity -- Argentina -- Buenos Aires -- History | Nationalism -- Argentina -- Buenos Aires -- History | Cultural pluralism -- Argentina -- Buenos Aires -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: To belong in Buenos Aires.DDC classification: 305.800982/11 LOC classification: F3001.9.G3 | B79 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction : the future of ethnicity -- Social welfare, paternalism, and the making of German Buenos Aires -- Children, language, and the rise of pluralist society -- The language of citizenship : curriculum and the Argentine state -- An unbounded nation? : local interests and imperial aspirations -- Transatlantic religion and the boundaries of community -- The language of religion : children and the future -- Conclusion : citizenship and ethnicity.
Summary: A social history of immigration and citizenship in Argentina in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Focusing on social welfare, education, religion, and the role of children, Benjamin Bryce analyzes the efforts of German-speaking immigrants to carve out a place for themselves in the broader landscape of an increasingly culturally plural society.
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F3001.9.G3 B79 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvqsdn6k Available ocn984743410

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction : the future of ethnicity -- Social welfare, paternalism, and the making of German Buenos Aires -- Children, language, and the rise of pluralist society -- The language of citizenship : curriculum and the Argentine state -- An unbounded nation? : local interests and imperial aspirations -- Transatlantic religion and the boundaries of community -- The language of religion : children and the future -- Conclusion : citizenship and ethnicity.

A social history of immigration and citizenship in Argentina in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Focusing on social welfare, education, religion, and the role of children, Benjamin Bryce analyzes the efforts of German-speaking immigrants to carve out a place for themselves in the broader landscape of an increasingly culturally plural society.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Historian Bryce (Univ. of Northern British Colombia) explains how German immigrants navigated among vying Argentine concepts of citizenship--liberal, Eurocentric, pluralist and conservative, nationalist, Hispanic--claiming that their schools, hospitals, and religious institutions could produce Argentine citizens who were also part of a wider German community (Germandom). The book focuses on institutions, mostly dominated by males who were self-appointed leaders, and recognizes distinctions among German immigrants, Lutheran and Catholic, who married other Germans or Argentines. Like Samuel L. Baily in his book on Italians in Argentina, Immigrants in the Lands of Promise (CH, Sep'99, 37-0637), Bryce advocates for a pluralistic vision of immigrants. Bryce's book is not as thorough as José Moya's study of Spanish immigrants to Buenos Aires, Cousins and Strangers (CH, Sep'98, 36-0497), and does not take into account important changes in Argentina during the last decades of the 19th and first decades of the 20th centuries. It does provide a detailed description of German immigrants between 1880 and 1930 and the variety of ways they attempted to remain German while becoming Argentine. Summing Up: Recommended. All academic levels/libraries. --James A. Baer, Northern Virginia Community College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Benjamin Bryce is Assistant Professor of History at the University of Northern British Columbia.

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