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Life is elsewhere : symbolic geography in the Russian provinces, 1800-1917 / Anne Lounsbery.

By: Lounsbery, Anne [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; NIU series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian studies.Publisher: Ithaca : Northern Illinois University Press, an imprint of Cornell University Press, 2019Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781501747946; 1501747940; 1501747932; 9781501747939.Subject(s): Country life in literature | Regionalism in literatureGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Life is elsewhereDDC classification: 891.70039372 LOC classification: PG2987.C68Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Geography, history, trope : facts on the ground -- Before the provinces : pastoral and anti-pastoral in Pushkin's countryside inventing provincial backwardness, or, "Everything is barbarous and horrid" (Herzen, Sollogub, and others) -- "This is Paris itself!" : Gogol in the town of N -- "I do beg of you, wait, and compare!" : Goncharov, Belinsky, and provincial taste -- Back home : the provincial lives of Turgenev's cosmopolitans -- Transcendence deferred : women writers in the provinces -- Melnikov and Leskov, or, What is regionalism in Russia? -- Centering and decentering in Dostoevsky and Tolstoy -- "Everything here is accidental" : Chekhov's geography of meaninglessness -- In the end : Shchedrin, Sologub, and terminal provinciality -- Conclusion : the provinces in the twentieth century.
Summary: "Author shows how nineteenth-century Russian literature created an imaginary place called "the provinces"--a place at once homogeneous, static, anonymous, and symbolically opposed to Petersburg and Moscow"-- Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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PG2987.C68 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.7591/j.ctvq2vx72 Available on1104853023

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Geography, history, trope : facts on the ground -- Before the provinces : pastoral and anti-pastoral in Pushkin's countryside inventing provincial backwardness, or, "Everything is barbarous and horrid" (Herzen, Sollogub, and others) -- "This is Paris itself!" : Gogol in the town of N -- "I do beg of you, wait, and compare!" : Goncharov, Belinsky, and provincial taste -- Back home : the provincial lives of Turgenev's cosmopolitans -- Transcendence deferred : women writers in the provinces -- Melnikov and Leskov, or, What is regionalism in Russia? -- Centering and decentering in Dostoevsky and Tolstoy -- "Everything here is accidental" : Chekhov's geography of meaninglessness -- In the end : Shchedrin, Sologub, and terminal provinciality -- Conclusion : the provinces in the twentieth century.

"Author shows how nineteenth-century Russian literature created an imaginary place called "the provinces"--a place at once homogeneous, static, anonymous, and symbolically opposed to Petersburg and Moscow"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on print version record and CIP data provided by publisher; resource not viewed.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This is another excellent release in the "NIU Series in Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies." Lounsbery (New York Univ.) examines how European Russian provincial life was depicted by various 19th-century Russian writers--Pushkin, Dostoevsky, Tolstoy, Chekhov, Gogol, and Turgenev and many other less-iconic authors (including select women). Lounsvery contrasts "all those nonexotic, non-borderland, 'native' spaces" with 19th-century authors' treatment of Moscow and St. Petersburg. She makes clear that Russian writers generally were less concerned with realistically portraying Russian provincial life than with depicting it as a symbol, often of Russian backwardness. Lounsbery also contrasts the geographic views of Russian writers about their country with views of some Western writers (e.g., Balzac) about theirs. In general, this is a nuanced and enlightening book written in clear, jargon-free prose--only the frequent appearance of trope reminds readers of the deconstructionists' contribution to obscure prose. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Walter Gerald Moss, emeritus, Eastern Michigan University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

<p>Anne Lounsbery teaches Russian literature at New York University. She has published numerous articles on Russian and comparative literature and is the author of Thin Culture, High Art .</p>

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