The Puritans : a Transatlantic History.

By: Hall, David DMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Princeton : Princeton University Press, 2019Description: 1 online resource (527 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780691195469; 0691195463Subject(s): Puritans -- HistoryAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Puritans : A Transatlantic History.DDC classification: 285.9 LOC classification: BX9323Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; CONTENTS; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 1 From Protestant to Reformed; CHAPTER 2 A Movement Emerges; CHAPTER 3 Reformation in Scotland; CHAPTER 4 The Practical Divinity; CHAPTER 5 A Reformation of Manners; CHAPTER 6 Royal Policies, Local Alternatives; CHAPTER 7 A New Sion? Reform, Rebellion, and Colonization c. 1625-1640; CHAPTER 8 The End of the Beginning, 1640-1660; CHAPTER 9 Change and Continuity; EPILOGUE Legacies; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index
Summary: A panoramic new history of Puritanism in England, Scotland, and New EnglandThis book is a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding critical new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, David Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth's reign to be unfinished. Hall's vivid and wide-ranging narrative describes the movement's deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a "perfect reformation" in the New World. A breathtaking work of scholarship by an eminent historian, The Puritans examines the tribulations and doctrinal dilemmas that led to the fragmentation and eventual decline of Puritanism. It presents a compelling portrait of a religious and political movement that was divided virtually from the start. In England, some wanted to dismantle the Church of England entirely and others were more cautious, while Puritans in Scotland were divided between those willing to work with a troublesome king and others insisting on the independence of the state church. This monumental book traces how Puritanism was a catalyst for profound cultural changes in the early modern Atlantic world, opening the door for other dissenter groups such as the Baptists and the Quakers, and leaving its enduring mark on what counted as true religion in America.
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Print version record.

Cover; Title Page; Copyright Page; CONTENTS; INTRODUCTION; CHAPTER 1 From Protestant to Reformed; CHAPTER 2 A Movement Emerges; CHAPTER 3 Reformation in Scotland; CHAPTER 4 The Practical Divinity; CHAPTER 5 A Reformation of Manners; CHAPTER 6 Royal Policies, Local Alternatives; CHAPTER 7 A New Sion? Reform, Rebellion, and Colonization c. 1625-1640; CHAPTER 8 The End of the Beginning, 1640-1660; CHAPTER 9 Change and Continuity; EPILOGUE Legacies; Acknowledgments; Notes; Index

A panoramic new history of Puritanism in England, Scotland, and New EnglandThis book is a sweeping transatlantic history of Puritanism from its emergence out of the religious tumult of Elizabethan England to its founding role in the story of America. Shedding critical new light on the diverse forms of Puritan belief and practice in England, Scotland, and New England, David Hall provides a multifaceted account of a cultural movement that judged the Protestant reforms of Elizabeth's reign to be unfinished. Hall's vivid and wide-ranging narrative describes the movement's deeply ambiguous triumph under Oliver Cromwell, its political demise with the Restoration of the English monarchy in 1660, and its perilous migration across the Atlantic to establish a "perfect reformation" in the New World. A breathtaking work of scholarship by an eminent historian, The Puritans examines the tribulations and doctrinal dilemmas that led to the fragmentation and eventual decline of Puritanism. It presents a compelling portrait of a religious and political movement that was divided virtually from the start. In England, some wanted to dismantle the Church of England entirely and others were more cautious, while Puritans in Scotland were divided between those willing to work with a troublesome king and others insisting on the independence of the state church. This monumental book traces how Puritanism was a catalyst for profound cultural changes in the early modern Atlantic world, opening the door for other dissenter groups such as the Baptists and the Quakers, and leaving its enduring mark on what counted as true religion in America.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Hall (emer., Harvard Divinity School) has written a fine-grained study of an elusive phenomenon: the daring Protestants--later known as Puritans--who criticized what they regarded as the fatally compromised Elizbethan settlement that asserted the monarch's power over the Church of England. Hall demonstrates enviable mastery of the theological debates, although his shifting definition of what constitutes Puritanism reveals the difficulty of grasping a movement that was more about lived experience than the pamphlet campaigns of divines. Like the late Patrick Collinson, Hall focuses on the stressful relationship between Puritans and the Church of England. The latter was deeply affected by the accession of James I, whose own struggle with the advocates of radical Reformation in Scotland shaped him into an inveterate enemy of Puritanism. Hall tells the familiar story of the movement's migration to New England, recounting how the fatal efforts of Charles I to align the Scottish Kirk with Anglican-style Protestantism triggered civil war, and the triumph and eclipse of religious radicalism during the interregnum. The closing chapter ("Legacies") describes how the expulsion of Puritan clergy by the Act of Uniformity created the tradition of "dissent" and the "nonconformist conscience." Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, faculty, and professionals. --Douglas R. Bisson, Belmont University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

David D. Hall is professor emeritus of American religious history at Harvard Divinity School. His books include Worlds of Wonder, Days of Judgment: Popular Religious Belief in Early New England , A Reforming People: Puritanism and the Transformation of Public Life in New England , and The Faithful Shepherd: A History of the New England Ministry in the Seventeenth Century . He lives in Arlington, Massachusetts.

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