Inventing destiny : cultural explorations of US expansion / edited by Jimmy L. Bryan Jr.

Contributor(s): Bryan, Jimmy L [editor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: Lawrence : University Press of Kansas, [2019]Description: 1 online resourceISBN: 9780700628193; 0700628193Additional physical formats: Print version:: No titleDDC classification: 973.2 LOC classification: E179.5Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: "everybody needs some elbow room": culture and contradiction in the study of US expansion / Jimmy L. Bryan Jr -- "A destiny in the womb of time": US expansion and its prophets / Jimmy L. Bryan Jr -- Stealing Naboth's Vineyard: the religious critique of expansion, 1830-1855 / Daniel J. Burge -- The art of Indian affairs: land and sky in Charles Bird King's Keokuk, the watchful fox / Kenneth Haltman -- Expansion in the East: Seneca sovereignty, Quaker missionaries, and the great survey, 1797-1801 / Elana Krischer -- Armed occupiers and slaveholding pioneers: mapping white settler colonialism in Florida / Laurel Clark Shire -- Geographies of expansion: nineteenth-century women's travel writing / Susan L. Roberson -- Revising Hannah Duston: domesticity and the frontier in nineteenth-century retellings of the Duston captivity / Chad A. Barbour -- Autobiography across borders: reading John Dunn Hunter's Memoirs of a captivity among the Indians of North America, from childhood to the age nineteen / Andy Doolen -- The Lansford Hastings imaginary: visions of democratic patriarchy in the Americas, 1842-1867 / Thomas Richards Jr -- Safely "beyond the limits of the United States": the Mormon expulsion and US expansion / Gerrit Dirkmaat -- At the center of Southern empire: the role of Gulf South communities in Antebellum territorial expansion / Maria Angela Diaz -- Inventing a national past: archaeological investigation in the Southwest in the aftermath of the US-Mexican war, 1851-1879 / Matthew Johnston.
Summary: "Conventional studies of US expansion have viewed the topic from political, diplomatic, economic, and military perspectives. In this collection, an interdisciplinary cast of scholars examine the subject from a variety of cultural perspectives, showing how narratives of empire and conquest formed in both low and high cultures. Many of the chapters will focus on the less remembered actors and outliers - anti-expansionists, Native Americans, Anglo-American women, and non-national expansionists - who significantly complicated the narratives of empire. The contributors examine a variety of source materials such as artwork, literature, and geospatial analysis alongside fresh readings of traditional historical texts. Instead of dwelling on the familiar narratives of "manifest destiny" or "the vanishing Indian," Inventing Destiny identifies and explores the less-remembered fictions of expansion, seeks a better understanding of the anti-expansionist response, and uncovers the resistance of those who were victims of US territorial aggrandizement"-- Provided by publisher.
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Introduction: "everybody needs some elbow room": culture and contradiction in the study of US expansion / Jimmy L. Bryan Jr -- "A destiny in the womb of time": US expansion and its prophets / Jimmy L. Bryan Jr -- Stealing Naboth's Vineyard: the religious critique of expansion, 1830-1855 / Daniel J. Burge -- The art of Indian affairs: land and sky in Charles Bird King's Keokuk, the watchful fox / Kenneth Haltman -- Expansion in the East: Seneca sovereignty, Quaker missionaries, and the great survey, 1797-1801 / Elana Krischer -- Armed occupiers and slaveholding pioneers: mapping white settler colonialism in Florida / Laurel Clark Shire -- Geographies of expansion: nineteenth-century women's travel writing / Susan L. Roberson -- Revising Hannah Duston: domesticity and the frontier in nineteenth-century retellings of the Duston captivity / Chad A. Barbour -- Autobiography across borders: reading John Dunn Hunter's Memoirs of a captivity among the Indians of North America, from childhood to the age nineteen / Andy Doolen -- The Lansford Hastings imaginary: visions of democratic patriarchy in the Americas, 1842-1867 / Thomas Richards Jr -- Safely "beyond the limits of the United States": the Mormon expulsion and US expansion / Gerrit Dirkmaat -- At the center of Southern empire: the role of Gulf South communities in Antebellum territorial expansion / Maria Angela Diaz -- Inventing a national past: archaeological investigation in the Southwest in the aftermath of the US-Mexican war, 1851-1879 / Matthew Johnston.

"Conventional studies of US expansion have viewed the topic from political, diplomatic, economic, and military perspectives. In this collection, an interdisciplinary cast of scholars examine the subject from a variety of cultural perspectives, showing how narratives of empire and conquest formed in both low and high cultures. Many of the chapters will focus on the less remembered actors and outliers - anti-expansionists, Native Americans, Anglo-American women, and non-national expansionists - who significantly complicated the narratives of empire. The contributors examine a variety of source materials such as artwork, literature, and geospatial analysis alongside fresh readings of traditional historical texts. Instead of dwelling on the familiar narratives of "manifest destiny" or "the vanishing Indian," Inventing Destiny identifies and explores the less-remembered fictions of expansion, seeks a better understanding of the anti-expansionist response, and uncovers the resistance of those who were victims of US territorial aggrandizement"-- Provided by publisher.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This edited volume, compiled by Bryan (Lamar Univ.), exhibits the contested role of Manifest Destiny in US history, providing an interdisciplinary investigation into American expansionism to unpack the numerous competing versions of the phenomenon. Contributors demonstrate how proponents of expansion looked to the future and promoted American greatness to stoke expansionist desire. Yet, expansion began much earlier than is generally recognized, since Americans in New York moved into Seneca lands during the 1790s. As elaborated here, religion was an important factor influencing Manifest Destiny in varying ways, motivating both advocacy for and opposition to Indian removal and land grabbing. Art historians and archaeologists reveal how 19th-century artwork and science supported expansion at the expense of Native Americans and nature. Travel writers also joined those espousing Manifest Destiny, though some lamented the tactics used by expansion's adherents. Women and African Americans also actively participated in the movement South and West, but this work dispels the image of the courageous settler, revealing instead that ideals of domesticity aided expansion, evidencing its gendered dimension. Taken together, these essays clearly demonstrate the many varieties and contested nature of Manifest Destiny. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Ray Frank Lucas, Texas Christian University

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