Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Korea in the cross currents : a century of struggle and the crisis of reunification / Robert J. Myers.

By: Myers, Robert John, 1924-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: New York : Palgrave, 2001Description: vii, 200 p. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 0312238150; 9780312238155.Subject(s): Korea -- History -- 20th century | Korean reunification question (1945- )DDC classification: 951.904 Other classification: 15.75
Contents:
Korea at the beginning of the twenty-first century: a guide for the perplexed -- Korea and the Chinese tributary system: will the past resemble the future? -- Japanese colonialism in Korea, 1910-1945 -- The fight for independence -- OSS and the Korean independence project -- The cold war erupts in Korea -- The bumblebee economy -- Democratic politics and Korean traditions -- North Korea: can the cold war regime be dismantled? -- Conclusion: Kim Dae-jung and the future of Korea.
Review: "The Korean peninsula underwent a continuous number of earth-shaking events in the twentieth century - although it is generally out of the earthquake zone. Jutting off the extreme northeast edge of the Eurasian landmass, and with a combined population of nearly 70 million people, North and South Korea are situated among China, Japan, and Russia. They are also profoundly influenced by the United States because of the circumstances of the Korean War (1950-1953). The issues of war and peace, left over from the Korean War, remain unresolved; these two separate states are the residue of the Cold War. This anomaly still poses ominous prospects for war or peace in Asia, and for American national security interests. Focusing on the last hundred years of Korea's long history, and its particular relationship with China, one is in a position both to understand and marvel at the events of this century on the Korean peninsula. At the same time, the complexity of the division of the country into North and South Korea - not just a perennial struggle between good and evil, although that is certainly part of the story - places the future at risk. There was one terrible war that divided the twentieth century in half and there are threats of more trouble to come. This study of the history of the past century will provide some answers and open the way to informed speculations as the two Koreas struggle over unification."--Jacket.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
DS916 .M94 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001516376
Browsing University of Texas At Tyler Shelves , Shelving location: Stacks - 3rd Floor Close shelf browser
DS907 .C62 Korea: a history. DS916.5.R5 O4 1960 Syngman Rhee : DS916 .M465 2005 The war for Korea, 1945-1950 : DS916 .M94 2001 Korea in the cross currents : DS917 .G6 1987 Korea; DS918 .A68 1986 Korea : DS918 .B4 1965 The Korea knot :

Includes bibliographical references (p. 187-192) and index.

Korea at the beginning of the twenty-first century: a guide for the perplexed -- Korea and the Chinese tributary system: will the past resemble the future? -- Japanese colonialism in Korea, 1910-1945 -- The fight for independence -- OSS and the Korean independence project -- The cold war erupts in Korea -- The bumblebee economy -- Democratic politics and Korean traditions -- North Korea: can the cold war regime be dismantled? -- Conclusion: Kim Dae-jung and the future of Korea.

"The Korean peninsula underwent a continuous number of earth-shaking events in the twentieth century - although it is generally out of the earthquake zone. Jutting off the extreme northeast edge of the Eurasian landmass, and with a combined population of nearly 70 million people, North and South Korea are situated among China, Japan, and Russia. They are also profoundly influenced by the United States because of the circumstances of the Korean War (1950-1953). The issues of war and peace, left over from the Korean War, remain unresolved; these two separate states are the residue of the Cold War. This anomaly still poses ominous prospects for war or peace in Asia, and for American national security interests. Focusing on the last hundred years of Korea's long history, and its particular relationship with China, one is in a position both to understand and marvel at the events of this century on the Korean peninsula. At the same time, the complexity of the division of the country into North and South Korea - not just a perennial struggle between good and evil, although that is certainly part of the story - places the future at risk. There was one terrible war that divided the twentieth century in half and there are threats of more trouble to come. This study of the history of the past century will provide some answers and open the way to informed speculations as the two Koreas struggle over unification."--Jacket.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Myers (Hoover Institution), a CIA veteran with 20 years of field experience in Southeast Asia, provides a brief but rounded overview of a century of history in one of the least understood countries on the globe. In nine chapters, he places the two Koreas in their 21st-century context and then surveys Korea in its late dynastic period as a tributary of China, in the long years as a Japanese colony and the struggle for independence, through WW II and the Cold War, and into its modern era of dramatic economic growth in the south and deepening troubles in the north, concluding with a discussion of prospects for Korean unification. As indicated by a reference to Japan's "Meiji era of 1876-1920" (the Meiji period actually was 1868-1912) there are some problems of accuracy in the text. The reader needs to be cautious and willing to spend time double-checking claims that seem dubious. For those with the knowledge or patience to overlook this sort of problem, the book can be a useful introduction to modern Korean history. Its brevity and accessibility will make it a popular choice among readers who wish to learn a good deal about 20th-century Korea without investing a great deal of time or energy. C. L. Yates Earlham College

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Robert Myers received his Ph.D. from the University of Chicago in International Relations and was a member of the CIA, assigned to various Southeast Asian countries for over twenty years. Resigning from the CIA in 1965 as deputy chief of the Far East Division, Myers became co-founder of the Washingtonian magazine and later publisher of the New Republic. From 1980 to 1994, he was president of the Carnegie Council on Ethics and International Affairs in New York City. Since 1995, he has been a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University, California

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.