Christ's associations. Connecting and belonging in the ancient city / john S. Kloppenborg.

By: Kloppenborg, John SMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press 2020Description: 1 online resource (536 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780300249309; 0300249306Additional physical formats: Print version:: Christ's associations. Connecting and belonging in the ancient city.DDC classification: 930 LOC classification: D51-95Online resources: Click here to view this ebook. Summary: A groundbreaking investigation of early Christ groups in the ancient Mediterranean that reshapes the perception of Christian associations in the first three centuries of the Common Era. As an urban movement, the early groups of Christ-followers came into contact with the many small groups in Greek and Roman antiquity. Organized around the workplace, a deity, a diasporic identity, or a neighborhood, these associations gathered in small face-to-face meetings and provided the principal context for cultic and social interactions for their members. Unlike most other groups, however, about which we have data on their rules of membership, financial management, and organizational hierarchy, we have very little information about early Christ groups. Drawing on data about associative practices throughout the ancient world, this innovative study offers new insight into the structure and mission of the early Christian groups. John S. Kloppenborg situates the Christian associations within the broader historical context of the ancient Mediterranean and reveals that they were probably smaller than previously believed and did not have a uniform system of governance, and that the attraction of Christian groups was based more on practice than theological belief.
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
D51-95 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvrdf22m Available on1126789287

A groundbreaking investigation of early Christ groups in the ancient Mediterranean that reshapes the perception of Christian associations in the first three centuries of the Common Era. As an urban movement, the early groups of Christ-followers came into contact with the many small groups in Greek and Roman antiquity. Organized around the workplace, a deity, a diasporic identity, or a neighborhood, these associations gathered in small face-to-face meetings and provided the principal context for cultic and social interactions for their members. Unlike most other groups, however, about which we have data on their rules of membership, financial management, and organizational hierarchy, we have very little information about early Christ groups. Drawing on data about associative practices throughout the ancient world, this innovative study offers new insight into the structure and mission of the early Christian groups. John S. Kloppenborg situates the Christian associations within the broader historical context of the ancient Mediterranean and reveals that they were probably smaller than previously believed and did not have a uniform system of governance, and that the attraction of Christian groups was based more on practice than theological belief.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

KloppenborgJohn S.:
John S. Kloppenborg is university professor and chair of the Department for the Study of Religion at the University of Toronto. A specialist in Christian origins, he has written extensively on the Synoptic Sayings Gospel (Q) and the parables of Jesus.

There are no comments on this title.

to post a comment.