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Federal Indian policy in the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, 1961-1969 / Thomas Clarkin.

By: Clarkin, Thomas, 1961-.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookPublisher: Albuquerque : University of New Mexico Press, c2001Edition: 1st ed.Description: xv, 376 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 082632262X; 9780826322623.Subject(s): Indians of North America -- Government relations | Indians of North America -- Politics and government | Kennedy, John F. (John Fitzgerald), 1917-1963 | Johnson, Lyndon B. (Lyndon Baines), 1908-1973 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1961-1963 | United States -- Politics and government -- 1963-1969DDC classification: 323.1/197073/09046
Contents:
The Termination Era -- The New Trail -- Native Americans and the Great Society -- The Nash Resignation -- The Indian Resources Development Act -- Bennett and Udall.
Review: "In the Wake of John F. Kennedy's inauguration in January 1961, efforts began to end policies that relocated American Indians to cities and redistributed tribal assets. During the 1960s the federal government's administrative responsibility for American Indian tribes underwent a fundamental change to undo the approach known as termination policies. While both presidents Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson sought to improve conditions for American Indians, they faced powerful congressional opposition to their efforts to end termination policies. This study is the history of executive and legislative leaders as well as Native Americans jostling to create a new Indian policy during the tumultuous 1960s." "During the years of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, American Indian political activism and political power expanded on the local and national fronts. Clarkin carefully traces American Indian efforts to gain control over the creation of Indian policy and the operation of government programs. He also thoroughly explores the conflict and sometimes unhappy compromises between and among administration officials, congressional leaders, and American Indians, including such key figures as Frank Church, Clinton P. Anderson, Stewart Udall, Robert Burnette, Vine Deloria, Jr. and, of course, presidents Kennedy and Johnson." "Clarkin's study of the shift in American Indian and white relations during the 1960s is a significant contribution to our understanding of federal Indian policy."--BOOK JACKET.
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Item type Current location Call number Status Date due Barcode
Book University of Texas At Tyler
Stacks - 3rd Floor
E93 .C65 2001 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001516772

Includes bibliographical references (p. 344-367) and index.

"In the Wake of John F. Kennedy's inauguration in January 1961, efforts began to end policies that relocated American Indians to cities and redistributed tribal assets. During the 1960s the federal government's administrative responsibility for American Indian tribes underwent a fundamental change to undo the approach known as termination policies. While both presidents Kennedy and Lyndon B. Johnson sought to improve conditions for American Indians, they faced powerful congressional opposition to their efforts to end termination policies. This study is the history of executive and legislative leaders as well as Native Americans jostling to create a new Indian policy during the tumultuous 1960s." "During the years of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations, American Indian political activism and political power expanded on the local and national fronts. Clarkin carefully traces American Indian efforts to gain control over the creation of Indian policy and the operation of government programs. He also thoroughly explores the conflict and sometimes unhappy compromises between and among administration officials, congressional leaders, and American Indians, including such key figures as Frank Church, Clinton P. Anderson, Stewart Udall, Robert Burnette, Vine Deloria, Jr. and, of course, presidents Kennedy and Johnson." "Clarkin's study of the shift in American Indian and white relations during the 1960s is a significant contribution to our understanding of federal Indian policy."--BOOK JACKET.

1. The Termination Era -- 2. The New Trail -- 3. Native Americans and the Great Society -- 4. The Nash Resignation -- 5. The Indian Resources Development Act -- 6. Bennett and Udall.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

Old-fashioned political history is needed to illuminate Indian history. Clarkin's examination of the Kennedy and Johnson decade is an excellent addition to political studies of recent Indian history, and adds substance to George Castile's To Show Heart (1998), Erin Fouberg's Tribal Territory, Sovereignty, and Governance (2000), and James McClurken's Fish in the Lakes, Wild Rice, and Game in Abundance (CH, Sep'00). The author's thesis is that Kennedy and Johnson did not have an Indian policy except in that they had policies for economically disadvantaged minorities, hence an emphasis on economic development. He correctly identifies the termination commitment of members of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs as an impediment to the creation of a policy of self-determination, gives credit to Office of Economic Development projects for laying the foundation for tribal leadership in the seventies, and credits the sophistication of Indian leaders in helping to shape Indian policy. Evaluation of the political actors adds to the merit of this monograph. Strongly recommended for undergraduate libraries. G. Gagnon University of North Dakota

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