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Consumer ethics in a global economy : how buying here causes injustice there / Daniel K. Finn.

By: Finn, Daniel K, 1947- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Moral traditions series.Publisher: Washington, DC : Georgetown University Press, 2019Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781626166974; 1626166978.Subject(s): Consumption (Economics) -- Moral and ethical aspects | Consumer behavior -- Moral and ethical aspects | Commerce -- Moral and ethical aspects | Social ethicsGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Consumer ethics in a global economy.DDC classification: 178 LOC classification: HB835Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Our situation -- Understanding our individualistic cultural bias -- Why economics sees markets individualistically -- Are consumers responsible for injustices a world away? -- Critical realism -- Critical realism and natural science -- Social structures -- Power -- The market as a social structure -- Implications -- Sinful social structures -- Economic ethics in a stratified world -- What can be done about market injustice? -- Conclusion.
Summary: Workers in distant nations who produce the products we buy frequently suffer from accidents, managerial malfeasance, and injustice. Are consumers who bought the products made by these workers in any way morally responsible for those injustices? And what about the far more frequent, less severe injustices, such as the withholding of wages, the denial of bathroom breaks, forced overtime, and harassment of various sorts? Could buying a shirt at the local department store create for you some responsibility for the horrendous death in a factory fire of the women who sewed it half a planet away?
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Item type Current location Call number URL Status Date due Barcode
Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
Online
HB835 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvswx7rz Available on1091291950

Our situation -- Understanding our individualistic cultural bias -- Why economics sees markets individualistically -- Are consumers responsible for injustices a world away? -- Critical realism -- Critical realism and natural science -- Social structures -- Power -- The market as a social structure -- Implications -- Sinful social structures -- Economic ethics in a stratified world -- What can be done about market injustice? -- Conclusion.

Workers in distant nations who produce the products we buy frequently suffer from accidents, managerial malfeasance, and injustice. Are consumers who bought the products made by these workers in any way morally responsible for those injustices? And what about the far more frequent, less severe injustices, such as the withholding of wages, the denial of bathroom breaks, forced overtime, and harassment of various sorts? Could buying a shirt at the local department store create for you some responsibility for the horrendous death in a factory fire of the women who sewed it half a planet away?

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