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Democracy's capital : black political power in Washington, D.C., 1960s-1970s / Lauren Pearlman.

By: Pearlman, Lauren [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks; Justice, Power, and Politics.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2019]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469653921; 1469653923.Subject(s): Representative government and representation -- Washington (D.C.) | Poor People's CampaignGenre/Form: Electronic books.Additional physical formats: Print version:: Democracy's capital.DDC classification: 305.8009753 LOC classification: F200 | .P43 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction. Make D.C. mean democracy's capital -- From civil rights to self-determination -- They just won't let it happen here: the 1968 riots -- SCLC goes to Washington: the 1968 Poor People's Campaign -- D.C. should not stand for disorder and crime: Richard Nixon's law-and-order campaign -- The spirit of '76: the battle over self-determination and urban development during the bicentennial -- Conclusion. Civil rights, law and order, and urban development in the post-home rule era.
Summary: "From its 1790 founding until 1974, Washington, D.C.--capital of 'the land of the free'--lacked democratically elected city leadership. Fed up with governance dictated by white stakeholders, federal officials, and unelected representatives, local D.C. activists catalyzed a new phase of the fight for home rule. Amid the upheavals of the 1960s, they gave expression to the frustrations of black residents and wrestled for control of their city. Bringing together histories of the carceral and welfare states, as well as the civil rights and Black Power movements, Lauren Elizabeth Pearlman narrates this struggle for self-determination in the nation's capital. She captures the transition from black protest to black political power under the Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon administrations and against the backdrop of local battles over the War on Poverty and the War on Crime"--Provided by publisher.
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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F200 .P43 2019 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469653921_pearlman Available on1118691995
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F194 1962-1963 Washington / F194 .L34 2016 A song to my city : F199.S67 2017 The House of Truth : F200 .P43 2019 Democracy's capital : F202.G3 L47 2016 Black Georgetown remembered : F203.5.M2S38 2009 Monument Wars : F205.S54 D35 2004 An imagined geography :

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction. Make D.C. mean democracy's capital -- From civil rights to self-determination -- They just won't let it happen here: the 1968 riots -- SCLC goes to Washington: the 1968 Poor People's Campaign -- D.C. should not stand for disorder and crime: Richard Nixon's law-and-order campaign -- The spirit of '76: the battle over self-determination and urban development during the bicentennial -- Conclusion. Civil rights, law and order, and urban development in the post-home rule era.

"From its 1790 founding until 1974, Washington, D.C.--capital of 'the land of the free'--lacked democratically elected city leadership. Fed up with governance dictated by white stakeholders, federal officials, and unelected representatives, local D.C. activists catalyzed a new phase of the fight for home rule. Amid the upheavals of the 1960s, they gave expression to the frustrations of black residents and wrestled for control of their city. Bringing together histories of the carceral and welfare states, as well as the civil rights and Black Power movements, Lauren Elizabeth Pearlman narrates this struggle for self-determination in the nation's capital. She captures the transition from black protest to black political power under the Lyndon Johnson and Richard Nixon administrations and against the backdrop of local battles over the War on Poverty and the War on Crime"--Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on October 10, 2019).

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