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The color of the third degree : racism, police torture, and civil rights in the American South, 1930-1955 / Silvan Niedermeier ; translated by Paul Cohen.

By: Niedermeier, Silvan [author.].
Contributor(s): Cohen, Paul (Paul Allen) [translator.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: Chapel Hill : The University of North Carolina Press, [2019]Description: 1 online resource.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781469652993; 1469652994.Uniform titles: Rassismus und Bürgerrechte. English Additional physical formats: Print version:: Color of the third degree.DDC classification: 305.800975 LOC classification: E185.61 | .N4913 2019Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Police torture and "legal lynchings" in the American South -- Torture and African American courtroom testimony -- The NAACP campaign against "forced confessions" -- Selective public outrage: the Quintar South case -- The investigations by the federal government.
Summary: "Available for the first time in English, 'The Color of the Third Degree' uncovers the still-hidden history of police torture in the Jim Crow South. Based on a wide array of previously neglected archival sources, Silvan Niedermeier argues that as public lynching decreased, less visible practices of racial subjugation and repression became central to southern white supremacy. In an effort to deter unruly white mobs, as well as oppress black communities, white southern law officers violently extorted confessions and testimony from black suspects and defendants in jail cells and police stations to secure speedy convictions. In response, black citizens and the NAACP fought to expose these brutal practices through individual action, local organizing, and litigation. In spite of these efforts, police torture remained a widespread, powerful form of racial control and suppression well into the late twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.
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E185.61 .N4913 2019 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.5149/9781469652993_niedermeier Available on1119730504
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E185.61 .L85 2014 The Social Gospel in Black and White : E185.61 .M23 2011 In the cause of freedom : E185.61 .M56 2002 Proudly we can be Africans : E185.61 .N4913 2019 The color of the third degree : E185.61 .O29 2010 Climbin' Jacob's ladder : E185.61 .R745 2007 Grassroots Garveyism : E185.61 .S34 2014 Police power and race riots :

Translation of: Rassismus und Bürgerrechte : Polizeifolter im Süden der USA, 1930-1955. Hamburg : Hamburger Edition, 2014.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Police torture and "legal lynchings" in the American South -- Torture and African American courtroom testimony -- The NAACP campaign against "forced confessions" -- Selective public outrage: the Quintar South case -- The investigations by the federal government.

"Available for the first time in English, 'The Color of the Third Degree' uncovers the still-hidden history of police torture in the Jim Crow South. Based on a wide array of previously neglected archival sources, Silvan Niedermeier argues that as public lynching decreased, less visible practices of racial subjugation and repression became central to southern white supremacy. In an effort to deter unruly white mobs, as well as oppress black communities, white southern law officers violently extorted confessions and testimony from black suspects and defendants in jail cells and police stations to secure speedy convictions. In response, black citizens and the NAACP fought to expose these brutal practices through individual action, local organizing, and litigation. In spite of these efforts, police torture remained a widespread, powerful form of racial control and suppression well into the late twentieth century"-- Provided by publisher.

Online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on October 04, 2019).

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