New essays on Eudora Welty, class, and race / edited by Harriet Pollack.

Contributor(s): Pollack, Harriet [editor.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksCritical perspectives on Eudora Welty: Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, [2020]Description: 1 online resource (vii, 232 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781496826190; 1496826191; 9781496826169; 1496826167; 9781496826176; 1496826175; 9781496826183; 1496826183Subject(s): Race relations in literatureAdditional physical formats: Print version:: New essays on Eudora Welty, class, and raceDDC classification: 813/.52 LOC classification: PS3545.E6 | Z79 2020Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race Reconsidered: An Introduction / Harriet Pollack -- Transformative Performances: Eudora Welty's "Negro State Fair Parade" Photographs / Annette Trefzer -- The Lynched Earth: Trees, Trespass, and Political Intelligence in Welty's "A Worn Path" and Morrison's Home / Donnie McMahand and Kevin L. Murphy -- Specters on Staircases: Race, Property, and the Gothic in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding, and Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon / Sarah Gilbreath Ford -- Moon Lake's Orphans and "The Other Way to Live" / Jean C. Griffith -- The Boogie in the Bush: The Boundaries of Race, Nature, and Desire in Eudora Welty's The Golden Apples / Christin Marie Taylor -- For Crying Out Loud, or "The Truth Is Something Worse, I Ain't Said What Yet": African American Howls and Cries as Radical Punctuation/Puncture in Eudora Welty's Fiction / Rebecca Mark -- Faltering Narrative: Eudora Welty's "The Burning," Slavery's Ghosts, and the Politics of Grief / Susan V. Donaldson -- Insiders, Outsiders, and Class Anxiety: Eudora Welty and Bob Dylan on the Medgar Evers Murder / Adrienne Akins Warfield -- Demonstration of Life: Signifying for Social Justice in Eudora Welty's "The Demonstrators" / Ebony O. Lumumba -- Welty's Moonlighting Detective: Whiteness and Welty's Subversion of the American Noir Tradition in "The Demonstrators" / Jacob Agner -- Ideology, Ethnicity, and Performativity in Eudora Welty's Losing Battles / Stephen M. Fuller.
Summary: "Contributions by Jacob Agner, Susan V. Donaldson, Sarah Gilbreath Ford, Stephen M. Fuller, Jean C. Griffith, Ebony Lumumba, Rebecca Mark, Donnie McMahand, Kevin Murphy, Harriet Pollack, Christin Marie Taylor, Annette Trefzer, and Adrienne Akins Warfield The year 2013 saw the publication of Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race, a collection in which twelve critics changed the conversation on Welty's fiction and photography by mining and deciphering the complexity of her responses to the Jim Crow South. The thirteen diverse voices in New Essays on Eudora Welty, Class, and Race deepen, reflect on, and respond to those seminal discussions. These essays freshly consider such topics as Welty's uses of African American signifying in her short stories and her attention to public street performances interacting with Jim Crow rules in her unpublished photographs. Contributors discuss her adaptations of gothic plots, haunted houses, Civil War stories, and film noir. And they frame Welty's work with such subjects as Bob Dylan's songwriting, the idea and history of the orphan in America, and standup comedy. They compare her handling of whiteness and race to other works by such contemporary writers as William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Chester Himes, and Alice Walker. Discussions of race and class here also bring her masterwork The Golden Apples and her novel Losing Battles, underrepresented in earlier conversations, into new focus. Moreover, as a group these essays provide insight into Welty as an innovative craftswoman and modernist technician, busily altering literary form with her frequent, pointed makeovers of familiar story patterns, plots, and genres"-- Provided by publisher.
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PS3545.E6 Z79 2020 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvs32r00 Available on1121420875

Includes bibliographical references.

Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race Reconsidered: An Introduction / Harriet Pollack -- Transformative Performances: Eudora Welty's "Negro State Fair Parade" Photographs / Annette Trefzer -- The Lynched Earth: Trees, Trespass, and Political Intelligence in Welty's "A Worn Path" and Morrison's Home / Donnie McMahand and Kevin L. Murphy -- Specters on Staircases: Race, Property, and the Gothic in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Eudora Welty's Delta Wedding, and Toni Morrison's Song of Solomon / Sarah Gilbreath Ford -- Moon Lake's Orphans and "The Other Way to Live" / Jean C. Griffith -- The Boogie in the Bush: The Boundaries of Race, Nature, and Desire in Eudora Welty's The Golden Apples / Christin Marie Taylor -- For Crying Out Loud, or "The Truth Is Something Worse, I Ain't Said What Yet": African American Howls and Cries as Radical Punctuation/Puncture in Eudora Welty's Fiction / Rebecca Mark -- Faltering Narrative: Eudora Welty's "The Burning," Slavery's Ghosts, and the Politics of Grief / Susan V. Donaldson -- Insiders, Outsiders, and Class Anxiety: Eudora Welty and Bob Dylan on the Medgar Evers Murder / Adrienne Akins Warfield -- Demonstration of Life: Signifying for Social Justice in Eudora Welty's "The Demonstrators" / Ebony O. Lumumba -- Welty's Moonlighting Detective: Whiteness and Welty's Subversion of the American Noir Tradition in "The Demonstrators" / Jacob Agner -- Ideology, Ethnicity, and Performativity in Eudora Welty's Losing Battles / Stephen M. Fuller.

"Contributions by Jacob Agner, Susan V. Donaldson, Sarah Gilbreath Ford, Stephen M. Fuller, Jean C. Griffith, Ebony Lumumba, Rebecca Mark, Donnie McMahand, Kevin Murphy, Harriet Pollack, Christin Marie Taylor, Annette Trefzer, and Adrienne Akins Warfield The year 2013 saw the publication of Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race, a collection in which twelve critics changed the conversation on Welty's fiction and photography by mining and deciphering the complexity of her responses to the Jim Crow South. The thirteen diverse voices in New Essays on Eudora Welty, Class, and Race deepen, reflect on, and respond to those seminal discussions. These essays freshly consider such topics as Welty's uses of African American signifying in her short stories and her attention to public street performances interacting with Jim Crow rules in her unpublished photographs. Contributors discuss her adaptations of gothic plots, haunted houses, Civil War stories, and film noir. And they frame Welty's work with such subjects as Bob Dylan's songwriting, the idea and history of the orphan in America, and standup comedy. They compare her handling of whiteness and race to other works by such contemporary writers as William Faulkner, Richard Wright, Toni Morrison, Chester Himes, and Alice Walker. Discussions of race and class here also bring her masterwork The Golden Apples and her novel Losing Battles, underrepresented in earlier conversations, into new focus. Moreover, as a group these essays provide insight into Welty as an innovative craftswoman and modernist technician, busily altering literary form with her frequent, pointed makeovers of familiar story patterns, plots, and genres"-- Provided by publisher.

Description based on online resource; title from digital title page (viewed on November 26, 2019).

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

The scholars Pollack (College of Charleston) brings together demonstrate the intersectionality of race, class, and gender in Welty's work. Pollack arranges the essays according to the chronology of Welty's canon. The first essay identifies the countertradition of a "reformed pastoral" that evokes the history of the US's racialized violence in Welty and Toni Morrison, drawing attention to the racial identities of the two very different writers. Another essay looks at Welty's and Bob Dylan's responses to the Medgar Evers murder and argues that class anxiety motivated racist violence and artistic responses to such violence. And another explores how nature, race, and desire complicate each other in Welty's famous The Golden Apples by identifying a hedge as the site where the insider whiteness and outsider blackness clash. Pollack's collection covers a wide range of new and interesting ways to read Welty's awareness of the need for change in racial politics: self-fashioning of African American identity in Negro State Fair parades; maids as property embodying the horror of slavery; orphanages exemplifying social engineering at the intersection of race and class. A must read for Welty scholars and also valuable for those interested in southern literature and American literature in general. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty. --Mantra Roy, San Jose State University

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Harriet Pollack is affiliate professor of American literature at College of Charleston. She is author of Eudora Welty's Fiction and Photography: The Body of the Other Woman , and her previous edited and coedited volumes include Eudora Welty, Whiteness, and Race ; Emmett Till in Literary Memory and Imagination ; Having Our Way: Women Rewriting Tradition in Twentieth-Century America ; and Eudora Welty and Politics: Did the Writer Crusade? She was the 2008 recipient of the Phoenix Award for outstanding contributions to Eudora Welty scholarship and has twice served as president of the Eudora Welty Society.

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