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The indecent screen : regulating television in the twenty-first century / Cynthia Chris.

By: Chris, Cynthia, 1961- [author.].
Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooks.Publisher: New Brunswick, New Jersey : Rutgers University Press, [2018]Description: 1 online resource (xii, 237 pages) : illustrations.Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9780813594088; 0813594081; 9780813594101; 0813594103.Subject(s): Television -- Law and legislation -- United States | Television broadcasting -- Censorship -- United States | Obscenity (Law) -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Indecent screen.DDC classification: 343.7309/946 LOC classification: KF2840 | .C48 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction: what we talk about when we talk about television and indecency -- A brief history of indecency in media in the twentieth century -- Targeting television in the twenty-first century -- Television : more or less? -- Bleeps and other obscenities -- Who's afraid of Dick Smart? : the body politic, public access, and the punitive state -- Conclusion: the future of indecency, and why it matters.
Summary: "[This book] explores clashes over indecency in broadcast television among U.S.-based media advocates, television professionals, the Federal Communications Commission, and TV audiences. [The author] focuses on the decency debates during an approximately twenty-year period since the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which in many ways restructured the media environment. Simultaneously, ever increasing channel capacity, new forms of distribution, and time-shifting (in the form of streaming and on-demand viewing options) radically changed how, when, and what we watch. But instead of these innovations quelling concerns that TV networks were too often transmitting indecent material that was accessible to children, complaints about indecency skyrocketed soon after the turn of the century. [The author] demonstrates that these clashes are significant battles over the role of family, the role of government, and the value of free speech in our lives, arguing that an uncensored media is so imperative to the public good that we can, and must, endure the occasional indecent screen."-- Provided by publisher.
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KF2840 .C48 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctt22rbjnh Available on1124761748

Includes bibliographical references (pages 181-228) and index.

Introduction: what we talk about when we talk about television and indecency -- A brief history of indecency in media in the twentieth century -- Targeting television in the twenty-first century -- Television : more or less? -- Bleeps and other obscenities -- Who's afraid of Dick Smart? : the body politic, public access, and the punitive state -- Conclusion: the future of indecency, and why it matters.

"[This book] explores clashes over indecency in broadcast television among U.S.-based media advocates, television professionals, the Federal Communications Commission, and TV audiences. [The author] focuses on the decency debates during an approximately twenty-year period since the Telecommunications Act of 1996, which in many ways restructured the media environment. Simultaneously, ever increasing channel capacity, new forms of distribution, and time-shifting (in the form of streaming and on-demand viewing options) radically changed how, when, and what we watch. But instead of these innovations quelling concerns that TV networks were too often transmitting indecent material that was accessible to children, complaints about indecency skyrocketed soon after the turn of the century. [The author] demonstrates that these clashes are significant battles over the role of family, the role of government, and the value of free speech in our lives, arguing that an uncensored media is so imperative to the public good that we can, and must, endure the occasional indecent screen."-- Provided by publisher.

Print version record.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

From their earliest days, radio and television broadcasting were considered public conveniences, and--because the air waves belong to the people--producers were obliged to air programming that respected what was considered common decency. Now, as more and more media outlets appear, so do censoring opportunities and censorship battles. Focusing on the two decades since the FCC passed the Telecommunications Act of 1996, Chris (media culture, College of Staten Island, CUNY) offers a succinct and pointed study of indecency and television censorship during the 21st century. For the benefit of younger readers, Chris includes a brief history of broadcast media censorship, mentioning George Carlin's "Filthy Words" routine and the "safe harbor" time slot (10:00 p.m.--6:00 a.m.) for airing "indecent content," and she includes a chronology of key government actions concerning indecency. Chris's examination is informative, especially for baby boomers who grew into adulthood as television grew into an essential commodity, though at times she reveals her bias with barbs at several conservative political and religious leaders. This is a well-documented study, but sensitive readers should be advised that explicit language peppers the text. Summing Up: Recommended. All readers. --Rebekah Ray, independent scholar

Author notes provided by Syndetics

CYNTHIA CHRIS is an associate professor in media culture at The College of Staten Island, City University of New York, and affiliated faculty in women's and gender studies at the CUNY Graduate Center. She is the author or coeditor of Watching Wildlife , Cable Visions , and Media Authorship .<br>

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