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Understanding sickle cell disease / Miriam Bloom.

By: Bloom, Miriam.
Material type: TextTextSeries: Understanding health and sickness series: Publisher: Jackson : University Press of Mississippi, c1995Description: x, 126 p. : ill., map ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0878057447 (alk. paper); 9780878057443 (alk. paper); 0878057455 (pbk. : alk. paper); 9780878057450 (pbk. : alk. paper).Subject(s): Sickle cell anemia -- Popular worksDDC classification: 616.1/527
Contents:
Sickle cell disease and how it is inherited -- Who has sickle cell disease and why? -- Inside the red blood cell -- Possible effects of sickle cell disease -- How to care for people with sickle cell disease -- Planning a family -- Searching for a cure.
Summary: A guide to understanding sickle cell anemia, a debilitating genetic disease that affects tens of thousands who are of African ancestry.
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Book Palestine campus
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RC641.7.S5 B56 1995 (Browse shelf) Available 0000001253152
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RC521 .L4 1996 One day at a time : RC630 .B28 2004 Fluid and electrolytes / RC630 .F596 2005 Fluids & electrolytes made incredibly easy. RC641.7.S5 B56 1995 Understanding sickle cell disease / RC683.5 .E5 E256 2005 ECG interpretation made incredibly easy. RC683.5.E5 J87 2005 Just the facts : RC69 .H246 2015 Handbook of signs & symptoms /

"For general readers a guide to understanding a debilitating genetic disease that affects tens of thousands who are of African ancestry"--Cover.

Includes bibliographical references (p. [117]-119) and index.

Sickle cell disease and how it is inherited -- Who has sickle cell disease and why? -- Inside the red blood cell -- Possible effects of sickle cell disease -- How to care for people with sickle cell disease -- Planning a family -- Searching for a cure.

A guide to understanding sickle cell anemia, a debilitating genetic disease that affects tens of thousands who are of African ancestry.

Reviews provided by Syndetics

Library Journal Review

"Over 50,000 black Americans suffer from sickle cell disease, which makes it a major public health concern in the United States," writes Bloom, a geneticist and former senior editor of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. This first volume in the publisher's new "Understanding Health and Sickness" series offers readers insight into this as yet incurable, inherited disease. Bloom starts with an overview of the disease; other topics include a discussion of who gets the disease (which includes not only people of African descent but of Mediterranean ancestry as well), the red blood cell, effects of the disease, care of sickle cell patients, family planning, and the search for a cure. An extensive list of organizations and support groups is included. Though dry and technical, Bloom's book gives informed general readers a look into this genetically transmitted disease. For medical collections. [See also "A Critical Care Collection for African Americans," LJ 1/95, p. 53-56.‘Ed.]‘Angela Washington-Blair, Lakemont Acad., Dallas (c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

CHOICE Review

Bloom describes sickle cell (SCD) disease (who inherits it, and why), blood cells (sickle cell-affected red corpuscles are crescent shaped), effects, caring for patients, family planning, and research. Besides this helpful history, addresses of centers, services, and support groups are provided, together with information on the Planned Parenthood organization. No cure is available, but more is known about SCD than about any other inherited disease. A SCD-afflicted person will survive malaria (more common in persons of African, Mediterranean, or Indian descent). Inheritance patterns are as follows: a couple with SCD will produce a child with SCD; a couple with the trait have one chance in four of producing a child with SCD. Proper diet, antibiotics (there is greater risk for infections with SCD), and pain killers can help create a more normal life for SCD patients. Different types of SCD may be milder. The average life expectancy for SCD persons has been measured for two forms: hemoglobin (Hb) S variety, 42/48 years (male/female); and 60/68 years for the milder Hb C form. Emotional problems affect both parents and children; support groups help people cope and raise their self-esteem. Bloom has produced a useful volume. General; two-year technical program students. H. O. Thompson; University of Pennsylvania

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