Patch Atlas [electronic resource] : Integrating Design Practices and Ecological Knowledge for Cities As Complex Systems.

By: Marshall, Victoria JContributor(s): Cadenasso, Mary L | McGrath, Brian PMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2020Description: 1 online resource (129 p.)ISBN: 9780300249392; 030024939XSubject(s): Land cover | Land cover -- Environmental aspects | City planning | City planning -- Environmental aspectsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Patch Atlas : Integrating Design Practices and Ecological Knowledge for Cities As Complex SystemsDDC classification: 307.1216 LOC classification: HT166Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface: Four Themes for an Atlas; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 Motivations for Characterizing the Hybrid, Social-Ecological City; Chapter 2 Unravelling Homogeneity: One Predominant Land Cover Element with Constrained Potential for Mixture; Chapter 3 Heterogeneity as Outcome of Urban Transformation: One Predominant Land Cover Element with Greater Potential for Mixture; Chapter 4 Regularity Within Patches as a Characteristic of Heterogeneity: Two Co-Dominant Land Cover Elements and Repeated Pairs
Chapter 5 The Case of Patch Plurality as a Lesson for Urban Mutability: Three to Five Co-Dominant Land Cover Elements and the Potential for RecombinationChapter 6 Speculating on Urban Futures; For Further Reading
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Electronic Book UT Tyler Online
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HT166 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvt1sg8j Available on1130902616

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Contents; Preface: Four Themes for an Atlas; Acknowledgments; Chapter 1 Motivations for Characterizing the Hybrid, Social-Ecological City; Chapter 2 Unravelling Homogeneity: One Predominant Land Cover Element with Constrained Potential for Mixture; Chapter 3 Heterogeneity as Outcome of Urban Transformation: One Predominant Land Cover Element with Greater Potential for Mixture; Chapter 4 Regularity Within Patches as a Characteristic of Heterogeneity: Two Co-Dominant Land Cover Elements and Repeated Pairs

Chapter 5 The Case of Patch Plurality as a Lesson for Urban Mutability: Three to Five Co-Dominant Land Cover Elements and the Potential for RecombinationChapter 6 Speculating on Urban Futures; For Further Reading

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

How are urban areas best classified in terms of their ecological and built character? This complex question is deftly addressed by the contributing authors of this small volume, a team of urban designers and ecologists. Building on research conducted by the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, a project funded under the NSF Long Term Ecological Research program, this work provides a mapping method to better integrate land cover classification with variations in the built environment. Not so much a traditional atlas, this work presents a unique visual language for describing land use types--such as tree or lawn cover, buildings, and pavement--and the relative percentages of each within a contiguous area. This language, called the HERCULES classification method, helps move urban ecology research past simplified land use categories to better understand impacts of the built environment on ecological functions. In addition to the informative graphics, the authors share insightful comments on successfully integrating design and ecology. Although brief, this work provides dense information within the scope of its beautiful graphic design. Delightful to read, the text will inspire students and professionals across disciplines, particularly in ecology, geographic information systems (GIS), urban and environmental planning, and civil engineering. Summing Up: Recommended. Upper-division undergraduates through faculty; professionals. --Christopher A Badurek, SUNY Cortland

Author notes provided by Syndetics

MarshallVictoria J.:
Victoria J. Marshall is President's Graduate Fellow at the National University of Singapore and founder of Till Design. Mary L. Cadenasso is professor of landscape and urban ecology at the University of California, Davis. Brian P. McGrath is professor of urban design at Parsons School of Design. Steward T. A. Pickett is distinguished senior scientist at Cary Institute of Ecosystem Studies and director emeritus of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study.

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