Boxing Pandora [electronic resource] : Rethinking Borders, States, and Secession in a Democratic World.

By: Waters, Timothy WilliamMaterial type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New Haven : Yale University Press, 2020Description: 1 online resource (320 p.)ISBN: 9780300249439; 0300249438Subject(s): Boundaries | Secession | Democracy | Separatist movementsAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Boxing Pandora : Rethinking Borders, States, and Secession in a Democratic WorldDDC classification: 320.12 LOC classification: JC323Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface: Why Write a Book about Secession? Why Read One?; A Note on Reading This Book; Introduction: The Boxes We Live in, the Beliefs We Have; PART ONE: THE CURRENT RULE; 1. The Failure of a Flourishing Idea: The Decadence of Self-Determination; 2. The Map of Our World: The Limits of the Classical System; 3. The Measure of Nations: Testing the Assumptions behind the Classical Rule; PART TWO: THE NEW RULE; 4. A New Right to Secession; 5. People, Territory, Plebiscite: The Main Features-Objections and Answers
6. Broader Implications: Features and Effects of the New Rule7. The Hardest Part: Creating a Right of Secession; Conclusion: The Value of Asking; Appendix: Scholarly Ferment on a Decadent Topic; Notes; Works Cited and Consulted; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z
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JC323 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvt1sg72 Available on1130903927

Description based upon print version of record.

Cover; Half Title; Title; Copyright; Dedication; Contents; Preface: Why Write a Book about Secession? Why Read One?; A Note on Reading This Book; Introduction: The Boxes We Live in, the Beliefs We Have; PART ONE: THE CURRENT RULE; 1. The Failure of a Flourishing Idea: The Decadence of Self-Determination; 2. The Map of Our World: The Limits of the Classical System; 3. The Measure of Nations: Testing the Assumptions behind the Classical Rule; PART TWO: THE NEW RULE; 4. A New Right to Secession; 5. People, Territory, Plebiscite: The Main Features-Objections and Answers

6. Broader Implications: Features and Effects of the New Rule7. The Hardest Part: Creating a Right of Secession; Conclusion: The Value of Asking; Appendix: Scholarly Ferment on a Decadent Topic; Notes; Works Cited and Consulted; Acknowledgments; Index; A; B; C; D; E; F; G; H; I; J; K; L; M; N; O; P; Q; R; S; T; U; V; W; X; Y; Z

Reviews provided by Syndetics

CHOICE Review

This provocative book is in favor of, well, Balkanization. Conventional defenses of democracy that begin and end with existing states, Waters (Indiana Univ.) argues, are too restrictive. Instead of offering elaborate requirements based on language, ethnicity, and sustainability, he suggests a new rule by which the right to form a new state requires just two things: "physical proximity and a decision to create a political community" (p. 136). Waters offers an interesting, sophisticated historical review of secession and self-determination, with case studies that both support and question the central argument. He concedes that smaller states may be more vulnerable, but he does not devote serious attention to the broader question of size and democracy. Aside from a few references to the Civil War, Waters--like too many students of comparative politics--ignores the case of the US, in particular James Madison's discussion in "Federalist No.10" of the vulnerability of small states to oppressive majorities: the "greater [the] variety of parties and interests ... [the] less probable that a majority of the whole will have a common motive to invade the rights of other citizens." This is a strange omission from an otherwise thorough study. Summing Up: Recommended. Graduate students, researchers, faculty. --Edward V. Schneier, emeritus, City College of the City University of New York

Author notes provided by Syndetics

WatersTimothy William:
Timothy William Waters is professor of law and associate director of the Center for Constitutional Democracy at Indiana University. Author of numerous scholarly articles and op-eds on international law and politics, he also edited The MiloseviÄ++ Trial: An Autopsy .

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