Imperial projections : screening the German colonies / Wolfgang Fuhrmann.

By: Fuhrmann, Wolfgang, 1965- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksFilm Europa: Publisher: New York ; Oxford : Berghahn Books, [2015]Copyright date: ©2015Description: 1 online resource : illustrationsContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781782386988; 178238698XSubject(s): Motion pictures -- Colonies -- Germany | Motion pictures in propaganda -- GermanyAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Imperial projectionsDDC classification: 070.1/8 LOC classification: PN1995.9.D6Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Introduction -- The beginning of colonial film culture in Imperial Germany. From the variety theatre to the German colonial society -- Carl Muller: a colonial film maker -- The DKG's film shows: the colonies in motion -- Addressing the masses. The 'Hottentot election' of 1907 -- The DKG's Kinematographenkampagne -- Rise and fall of the Kinemtographenkampagne -- Ethnographic filmmaking in the colonies -- Karl Weule in German East Africa -- The expedition in context: modern German ethnography -- Filming in the Colonies: Training and Improvisation -- Tourism, Entertainment, and Colonial Ideology. Colonial Films in Public Cinema -- The colonial travelogue -- Colonial films in transition: Robert Schumann's comeback -- Colonial film propaganda during the First World War. Setting up colonial war propaganda -- The Deutsche Kolonial-filmgesellschaft (DEUKO) -- Conclusion. Beyond the colonial era.
Summary: The beginning of filmmaking in the German colonies coincided with colonialism itself coming to a standstill. Scandals and economic stagnation in the colonies demanded a new and positive image of their value for Germany. By promoting business and establishing a new genre within the fast growing film industry, films of the colonies were welcomed by organizations such as the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (German Colonial Society). The films triggered patriotic feelings but also addressed the audience as travelers, explorers, wildlife protectionists, and participants in unique cultural events. This book is the first in-depth analysis of colonial filmmaking in the Wilhelmine Era.
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Includes bibliographical references (pages 278-301) and index.

Includes filmography.

Introduction -- The beginning of colonial film culture in Imperial Germany. From the variety theatre to the German colonial society -- Carl Muller: a colonial film maker -- The DKG's film shows: the colonies in motion -- Addressing the masses. The 'Hottentot election' of 1907 -- The DKG's Kinematographenkampagne -- Rise and fall of the Kinemtographenkampagne -- Ethnographic filmmaking in the colonies -- Karl Weule in German East Africa -- The expedition in context: modern German ethnography -- Filming in the Colonies: Training and Improvisation -- Tourism, Entertainment, and Colonial Ideology. Colonial Films in Public Cinema -- The colonial travelogue -- Colonial films in transition: Robert Schumann's comeback -- Colonial film propaganda during the First World War. Setting up colonial war propaganda -- The Deutsche Kolonial-filmgesellschaft (DEUKO) -- Conclusion. Beyond the colonial era.

Print version record.

The beginning of filmmaking in the German colonies coincided with colonialism itself coming to a standstill. Scandals and economic stagnation in the colonies demanded a new and positive image of their value for Germany. By promoting business and establishing a new genre within the fast growing film industry, films of the colonies were welcomed by organizations such as the Deutsche Kolonialgesellschaft (German Colonial Society). The films triggered patriotic feelings but also addressed the audience as travelers, explorers, wildlife protectionists, and participants in unique cultural events. This book is the first in-depth analysis of colonial filmmaking in the Wilhelmine Era.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Wolfgang Fuhrmann teaches film at the University of Zurich's Department of Film Studies. From 2005-2008 he was Director of the DFG Research Project "Film and Ethnography in Germany 1900-1930," and has held teaching positions in Germany, Switzerland, and the Americas. He has published on German colonial cinema, early ethnographic filmmaking, historical film reception, and transnational film history.

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