Economic citizenship : neoliberal paradoxes of empowerment / Amalia Saʻar.

By: Saʻar, Amalia, 1963- [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksPublisher: New York : Berghahn Books, 2016Description: 1 online resourceContent type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781785331800; 1785331809Subject(s): Women -- Israel -- Social conditions | Women -- Israel -- Economic conditions | Women -- Employment -- Israel | Poor women -- Israel -- Social conditions | Discrimination -- Israel | Equality -- Israel | Citizenship -- IsraelAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Economic citizenship.DDC classification: 305.4095694 LOC classification: HQ1728.5 | .S23 2016Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
List of Tables; List of Abbreviations and Research Projects; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I -- Paradoxes of the Pursuit of Solidarity amid Polarizing Social Inequalities; Chapter 1 -- Social Economy: The Quest for Social Justice under Neoliberalism; Part II -- Women Making Sense of the Demand to Make Money; Chapter 2 -- Vulnerability; Chapter 3 -- Empowerment; Chapter 4 -- Entitlement; Part III -- Economic Citizenship-Between the Right to Work and the Obligation to Be Productive; Chapter 5 -- Discussion-The Emergence of a Hybrid Local Discourse on Inclusion, Productivity, and Care.
Summary: With the spread of neoliberal projects, responsibility for the welfare of minority and poor citizens has shifted from states to local communities. Businesses, municipalities, grassroots activists, and state functionaries share in projects meant to help vulnerable populations become self-supportive. Ironically, such projects produce odd discursive blends of justice, solidarity, and wellbeing, and place the languages of feminist and minority rights side by side with the language of apolitical consumerism. Using theoretical concepts of economic citizenship and emotional capitalism, Economic Citizenship exposes the paradoxes that are deep within neoliberal interpretations of citizenship and analyzes the unexpected consequences of applying globally circulating notions to concrete local contexts.-- Provided by Publisher.
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HQ1728.5 .S23 2016 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvr6966d Available ocn956990912

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Print version record.

List of Tables; List of Abbreviations and Research Projects; Acknowledgments; Introduction; Part I -- Paradoxes of the Pursuit of Solidarity amid Polarizing Social Inequalities; Chapter 1 -- Social Economy: The Quest for Social Justice under Neoliberalism; Part II -- Women Making Sense of the Demand to Make Money; Chapter 2 -- Vulnerability; Chapter 3 -- Empowerment; Chapter 4 -- Entitlement; Part III -- Economic Citizenship-Between the Right to Work and the Obligation to Be Productive; Chapter 5 -- Discussion-The Emergence of a Hybrid Local Discourse on Inclusion, Productivity, and Care.

With the spread of neoliberal projects, responsibility for the welfare of minority and poor citizens has shifted from states to local communities. Businesses, municipalities, grassroots activists, and state functionaries share in projects meant to help vulnerable populations become self-supportive. Ironically, such projects produce odd discursive blends of justice, solidarity, and wellbeing, and place the languages of feminist and minority rights side by side with the language of apolitical consumerism. Using theoretical concepts of economic citizenship and emotional capitalism, Economic Citizenship exposes the paradoxes that are deep within neoliberal interpretations of citizenship and analyzes the unexpected consequences of applying globally circulating notions to concrete local contexts.-- Provided by Publisher.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

Amalia Sa'ar is a cultural anthropologist at the University of Haifa. She has done research on gender politics among the Palestinian citizens of Israel, on the implications of the gender-contract cultural scheme for women's work strategies and work prospects, on women's perceptions of peace, war, and security, and on generational relations in Israeli feminism.

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