Immigrants under threat : risk and resistance in deportation nation / Greg Prieto.

By: Prieto, Greg [author.]Material type: TextTextSeries: JSTOR eBooksLatina/o sociology series: Publisher: New York : New York University Press, [2018]Copyright date: ©2018Description: 1 online resource (vii, 237 pages)Content type: text Media type: computer Carrier type: online resourceISBN: 9781479868810; 1479868817Subject(s): Mexicans -- Government policy -- United States | Illegal aliens -- Government policy -- United StatesAdditional physical formats: Print version:: Immigrants under threat.DDC classification: 325.73 LOC classification: JV6483 | .P75 2018Online resources: Click here to view this ebook.
Contents:
Ghost in the deportation machine: a brief history of immigrant inclusion through exclusion -- "The sense of law is lost": car impoundments and the racial naturalization of Mexican immigrants -- The shell: the inward turn in the everyday lives of Mexican immigrants -- Instrumental activists: a pragmatic immigrant politics of making history to make life -- Opportunity and threat: comparing collaborative and confrontational tactics in local immigrant rights struggles -- Conclusion: American dream, American hypocrisy.
Summary: A portrait of two Mexican immigrant communities confronting threats of deportation, detention, and dispossession Everyday life as an immigrant in a deportation nation is fraught with risk, but everywhere immigrants confront repression and dispossession, they also manifest resistance in ways big and small. Immigrants Under Threat shifts the conversation from what has been done to Mexican immigrants to what they do in response. From private strategies of avoidance, to public displays of protest, immigrant resistance is animated by the massive demographic shifts that started in 1965 and an immigration enforcement regime whose unprecedented scope and intensity has made daily life increasingly perilous. Immigrants Under Threat focuses on the way the material needs of everyday life both enable and constrain participation in immigrant resistance movements. Using ethnographic research from two Mexican immigrant communities on California's Central Coast, Greg Prieto argues that immigrant communities turn inward to insulate themselves from the perceived risks of authorities and a hostile public. These barriers are overcome through the face-to-face work of social-movement organizing that transforms individual grievances into collective demands. The social movements that emerge are shaped by the local political climates in which they unfold and remain tethered to their material inspiration. Immigrants Under Threat explains that Mexican immigrants seek not to transcend, but to burrow into American institutions of law and family so that they might attain a measure of economic stability and social mobility that they have sought all along.
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JV6483 .P75 2018 (Browse shelf) https://ezproxy.uttyler.edu/login?url=https://www.jstor.org/stable/10.2307/j.ctvwrm5b2 Available on1032811300
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JV6483 .M547 2015 Migrant Mobilization and Securitization in the US and Europe : JV6483 .N435 2013 Impossible Subjects : JV6483 .N49 2014 Impossible Subjects : JV6483 .P75 2018 Immigrants under threat : JV6483 .P86 2012 Punishing immigrants : JV6483 .R66 2013 Those damned immigrants : JV6483 .S393 2013 Right to dream :

A portrait of two Mexican immigrant communities confronting threats of deportation, detention, and dispossession Everyday life as an immigrant in a deportation nation is fraught with risk, but everywhere immigrants confront repression and dispossession, they also manifest resistance in ways big and small. Immigrants Under Threat shifts the conversation from what has been done to Mexican immigrants to what they do in response. From private strategies of avoidance, to public displays of protest, immigrant resistance is animated by the massive demographic shifts that started in 1965 and an immigration enforcement regime whose unprecedented scope and intensity has made daily life increasingly perilous. Immigrants Under Threat focuses on the way the material needs of everyday life both enable and constrain participation in immigrant resistance movements. Using ethnographic research from two Mexican immigrant communities on California's Central Coast, Greg Prieto argues that immigrant communities turn inward to insulate themselves from the perceived risks of authorities and a hostile public. These barriers are overcome through the face-to-face work of social-movement organizing that transforms individual grievances into collective demands. The social movements that emerge are shaped by the local political climates in which they unfold and remain tethered to their material inspiration. Immigrants Under Threat explains that Mexican immigrants seek not to transcend, but to burrow into American institutions of law and family so that they might attain a measure of economic stability and social mobility that they have sought all along.

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Ghost in the deportation machine: a brief history of immigrant inclusion through exclusion -- "The sense of law is lost": car impoundments and the racial naturalization of Mexican immigrants -- The shell: the inward turn in the everyday lives of Mexican immigrants -- Instrumental activists: a pragmatic immigrant politics of making history to make life -- Opportunity and threat: comparing collaborative and confrontational tactics in local immigrant rights struggles -- Conclusion: American dream, American hypocrisy.

Print version record.

Author notes provided by Syndetics

PrietoGreg:

Greg Prieto is Assistant Professor of Sociology at the University of San Diego.

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